Blog Archives

Accessing BNA

There is a slight change with accessing BNA (Bureau of National Affairs) content this semester. The bad news is that LexisNexis has announced that BNA publications will no longer be available on Lexis Advance or lexis.com. BNA documents saved to

Posted in for Faculty, for Students, Legal Research

New research guide for newspapers

Whether you are looking for PDFs of newspaper articles for your journal, interested in reading a print copy the old fashioned way, or just wanting a way to read some of those newspaper articles you now find behind online paywalls,

Posted in for Faculty, for Students, Legal Research, Publications

Tarlton Law Library Participating in Perma

Have you ever encountered that bane of researchers everywhere, link rot? Perma.cc to the rescue!

Posted in for Faculty, for Students, Front Page News, Legal Research

Celebrate Pro Bono Week

October 20-26 is National Pro Bono Week, and UT Law is joining in the celebration. As our contribution, the Library is highlighting free and low cost legal research resources that may help you in your pro bono work.

Posted in Events, for Students, Front Page News, Legal Research

Researching for On Campus Interviews

As you prepare for on campus interviewing, you will likely want to research the process, the firms, and even some of the individual lawyers. Below are resources to help you find all of the information you need.

Posted in Collection Highlights, for Students, Legal Research

The Curious Case of Different Dimensions

As a football fan, from a town with a perennially and notoriously terrible baseball team (and a mostly bad football team, for that matter), I’ve never understood why baseball fans talk about differences between ballparks. Sure, I get how players can hit more home runs at Coors Field in Denver than in other places — the air is thinner when you’re at such a high elevation. But apparently other parks are considered “home run friendly”, whatever that means. How can it be easier to hit the long ball at one park than others? Aren’t they all the same? Doesn’t the game demand it?

Posted in Collection Highlights, for Students, Legal Research

News Topics

Subscribe

Archives