Suggested Courses for Pre-Law Majors

NOTE: The purpose of this list is to provide options for course selection; they are not required for pre-law students and may not be appropriate for everyone. For further assistance, students should consult the pre-law advisor located at Liberal Arts Career Services.

Communication Studies

CMS 306M. Professional Communication Skills

Designed to help students develop skills in one-on-one interactions, small group communication, and presentation skills. Basic communication theories as they relate to skill development are explored.

CMS 317M. Advanced Presentation Skills

Designed to help students develop skills in delivering informative and persuasive presentations and speeches. Study of major theories related to oral presentations. Focus on audience analysis and adaptation, building strong arguments, speech organization, and use of new technologies. Prerequisite: one of the following courses: CMS 305, 306M, 319, SPE 305, 319.

CMS 332. Argumentation and Advocacy

Course is normally restricted to CMS majors; however, it is occasionally available to non-majors. Nature of argumentative controversy; variables of form, method and ethics; analysis of argumentative rhetorical works. Prerequisite: upper-division standing and consent of CMS undergraduate advisor.

Economics

ECO 304K. Introduction to Microeconomics

Analysis of the economic behavior of individual consumers, firms, and workers; special attention to the role of markets.

ECO 304L. Introduction to Microeconomics

Analysis of the economy as a whole (it’s organization and the basic forces influencing its growth and development); money and banking, national income, public finance, and international linkages. Prerequisite: ECO 304K with a grade of at least a C.

Government

NOTE: Upper-division Government courses are generally restricted to majors. Students not majoring in Government may be able to enroll in these courses when/if restrictions are lifted during adds and drops and/or with consent of the advisor.

GOV 320K and/or GOV 320N. American Constitutional Development I and II

Primarily for pre-law students and government majors. A survey of the origin and growth of the American constitutional system, with emphasis on the political and economic background. Prerequisite: 6 hours of lower-division GOV.

GOV 327L. Public Opinion and American Politics

The nature of and major influences on public attitudes, the measurement of public opinion, and the role of public opinion in government. Prerequisite: 6 hours of lower-division GOV.

GOV 331L. Law and Society

Designed primarily for pre-law students. The role of law in the context of major social issues; legal research and oral argument. Prerequisite: 6 hours of lower-division GOV.

GOV 347L. Introduction to Political Theory

Study of political theory: what it is; its origins, tradition; political theory today. Prerequisite: 6 hours of lower-division GOV.

GOV 357L. Judicial Process and Behavior

Introduction to traditional and modern approaches to the study of the judicial process, with emphasis on the nature and origin of judicial decisions and the factors that affect judicial decision making. Prerequisite: 6 hours of lower-division GOV.

GOV 357M. Topics in Public Law

Intensive study of various aspects of law and the legal system. May be repeated for credit when topics vary. Prerequisite: 6 hours of lower-division GOV.

GOV 370L. Topics in American Government and Politics.

Analysis of varying topics in the study of American government and politics. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Six semester hours of lower-division coursework in government.

History

HIS 315K.  The United States, 1492-1865

Survey of United States history from the colonial period through the Civil War. Partially fulfills legislative requirement for American history. Prerequisite: 15 hours of coursework.

HIS 315L. The United States since 1865

Survey of United States history since the Civil War. . Partially fulfills legislative requirement for American history. Prerequisite: 15 hours of coursework.

HIS 317L. Topics in United States History

May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Partially fulfills legislative requirement for American history. Prerequisite: 30 hours of coursework.

HIS 334L. The American Revolution and the Founding of the United States, 1763-1789.

The Revolutionary transformation of America between 1763 and 1800. Partially fulfills legislative requirement for American history. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.

HIS 334M. The Jeffersonian Era, 1800-1829.

Analysis of the early American republic; emphasis on Jeffersonian republicanism as ideology and as public policy. Partially fulfills legislative requirement for American history. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.

HIS 355S. United States Constitutional History.

A lecture and discussion course dealing with the history of the development of the American constitutional tradition from colonial times to the present. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.

HIS 350L. Civil Rights in America (Topic 7)

Lectures, discussion, reading and research on civil rights in America. Partially fulfills legislative requirement for American history. Prerequisite: upper-division standing and consent of instructor.

Linguistics

LIN 350. Language and Thought (Topic 2)

Study of the relation between language and thought, using a cognitive science approach. Examines the words people use and how people think; whether language structure affects thought; and some cognitive aspects of language.  Prerequisite: upper-division standing.

Philosophy

PHL 304. Contemporary Moral Problems.

Primarily for lower-division students. Philosophical examinations of selected moral problems arising out of contemporary society and culture.

PHL 311. Argument

Argument as a kind of discourse; deductive and inductive arguments; principles of reasoning; fallacies; practical applications.

PHL 312. Introduction to Logic

Logical structure of sentences and arguments; elementary symbolic methods; applications. May not be counted for students with prior credit for PHL 313, 313K, 313Q, or 344K.

PHL 318. Introduction to Ethics

Study of basic principles of the moral life, with critical examination of traditional and contemporary theories of the nature of goodness, happiness, duty, and freedom. PHL 610Q and 318 may not both be counted.

PHL 325L. Business, Ethics, and Public Policy

Issues in ethics and politics that are relevant to the organization of business and industry and the distribution of power in society; topics include the role of industry; concepts of profit, property, and moral responsibility. Prerequisite: upper-division standing or consent of the instructor or the undergraduate advisor.

PHL 325M. Medicine, Ethics, and Society

Moral, legal, religious, and political implications of developments in medicine; topics include abortion, euthanasia, sterilization, psychosurgery, genetic engineering; concepts of health, cure, insanity, and death. Prerequisite: upper-division standing or consent of the instructor or the undergraduate advisor.

PHL 347. Philosophy of Law

The significance and function of law in political and ethical contexts; comparison of common and statutory to scientific and moral law; readings from among Plato, Kant, Hegel, Bentham, Austin, Hart, Dworkin, Feinberg, and others. Prerequisite: upper-division standing or consent of the instructor or the undergraduate advisor.

Psychology

PSY 301. Introduction to Psychology

Basic problems and principals of human experience and behavior.

PSY 319K. Social Psychology

Theory and research on the analysis of human conduct in social settings. Prerequisite: PSY 301 with a grade of at least a C.

Rhetoric and Communication

RHE 309S. Critical Reading and Persuasive Writing

An advanced rhetoric and composition course that stresses rigorous analysis and practice in writing arguments. Prerequisite: RHE 306 or the equivalent.

RHE 325M. Advanced Expository Writing.

Designed for students in the humanities and the social sciences who feel the need to improve and extend their skills in expository writing. English 325M and Rhetoric and Composition 325M may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Completion of at least thirty semester hours of coursework, including English 316K or the equivalent, and consent of instructor.

RHE 330E.  Rhetorical Theory and Analysis

Examination of theories of rhetoric; application of theory to the analysis of texts. Prerequisite: completion of at least thirty hours of coursework, including E 316K or the equivalent.

Sociology

SOC 302. Introduction to the Study of Society

The nature of human societies, social processes, social interaction, and the sociological approach.

SOC 308. Social Problems

A review of contemporary social problems from a sociological perspective, with the instructor choosing one problem for emphasis. May be repeated for credit when topics vary.

SOC 318. Juvenile Delinquency

Environments in which juvenile delinquency develops; delinquent subcultures and peer groups; societal reactions in schools, courts, and other agencies.

SOC 320K. Political Sociology

A survey of approaches to the study of the state as a social structure; political power and power systems; ideology; political parties and elites. Prerequisite: upper-division standing.

SOC 325K. Criminology

An investigation into the nature of criminal events, including homicide, rape, robbery, property crimes, and white-collar crimes. Also examines the United States criminal justice system. Prerequisite: upper-division standing and completion of six semester hours in SOC.

SOC 325L. Sociology of Criminal Justice

Police, courts, and prisons; how they work; their impact on those who pass through them. Prerequisite: upper-division standing.

SOC 329. Social Stratification

The types and levels of social inequality; the institutional and group processes that generate inequality; the interplay of social, organizational, economic, and political forces that affect the degree of differential opportunities and rewards in society. Prerequisite: upper-division standing. Completion of SOC 317L or another statistics course is recommended, but not required.

SOC 336P. Social Psychology and the Law

How courts make use of social science, as well as how social scientists study the legal system. Considers the uses of social science across multiple types of legal domains, such as eyewitnesses to crime, jury trials, punishment, children in the courts, and a variety of public policy issues. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.

Social Work

S W 311. Criminal Justice System (Selected Topics in Social Welfare)

Analysis of selected policy and program implications in the human services. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

Statistics

EDP 371. Introduction to Statistics

Measures of central tendency and variability; correlation and regression; probability and statistical inference; analysis of variance; nonparametric statistics.

M 316. Elementary Statistical Methods

Graphical presentation, frequency functions, distribution functions, averages, standard deviation, variance, curve-fitting, and related topics. May not be counted toward the major requirement for Math majors. Prerequisite: A score of at least 430 on the SAT II: Math Level IC test, of M 301 with a grade of at least a C.

PSY 317. Statistical Methods in Psychology

Recommended for majors who plan to do graduate work in psychology or related fields. Measures of central tendency and variability; statistical inference; correlation and regression. Prerequisite: PSY 301 with a grade of at least a C.

S W 318. Social Work Statistics

Introduction to statistics commonly used in social work research, with emphasis on research  designs appropriate to social work. Prerequisite: M 302, 303D or M 305G.

For Students Interested in Corporate or Tax Law

ACC 310F. Foundations of Accounting

An introduction to financial and managerial accounting, with emphasis on the content, interpretation, and uses of accounting reports. May not be counted toward the Bachelor of Business Administration degree.

LEB 320F.  Foundations of the Legal Environment of Business

Introduction to the legal problems confronting businesses in the global environment. May not be counted toward the Bachelor of Business Administration degree. Prerequisite: upper-division standing.

Business Foundation Program

A series of four to six business courses that provide a solid foundation in business fundamentals. Students can earn the BFP certificate or use the courses as a minor for most undergraduate degree programs.

Updated 1/08

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