Complex Emergencies and Political Stability in Asia

CEPSA was a three-year project, $1.9 million project for the Pentagon under its Minerva Initiative. I was Principal Investigator. Here are some of the written products I contributed to.

Peer-Reviewed Pieces

“In Harm’s Way: Climate Security Vulnerability in Asia” with Todd G. Smith, Nisha Krishnan, Charles Wight, and Santiago Vallejo-Gutierrez, World Development2018.

Final Project Report

31 May 2019

This report summarizes CEPSA program findings on disaster vulnerability and response, conflict assessment, complex emergencies, and Asian politics. Understanding how different insecurities coalesce to impact vulnerability in Asia—and assessing when and how these insecurities can develop into complex emergencies—has strong implications for U.S. national and international security.

Policy Reports

– “Widening the Scope to Asia: Climate Change and Security” with Nisha Krishnan in Climate Change, Security and the Asia-Pacific Rebalance, edited by Frank Femia and Caitlin Werrell, Center for Climate and Security. 2015

Policy Briefs

04 April 2019

The CEPSA climate security vulnerability research team presents its updated findings of the Asian Climate Security Vulnerability model version 2 (ACSV V2), an attempt to map sub-national climate security vulnerability in 11 countries in South and Southeast Asia.

10 May 2016

CEPSA climate security vulnerability researchers Josh Busby, Nisha Krishnan, Todd Smith, and Charles Wight present the preliminary findings of the effort to map sub-national climate security vulnerability in 11 countries in South and Southeast Asia. Study countries include six countries in South Asia (Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, Nepal, Pakistan, and Sri Lanka) and five countries in Southeast Asia (Cambodia, Laos, Myanmar, Thailand, and Vietnam).

Dashboard

CEPSA Dashboard

Country Mini-Briefs

CEPSA climate security vulnerability researchers provide in-depth analyses through a series of condensed research briefs in order to assess the impact of natural disasters in eleven countries in South and Southeast Asia.