CFP: Ukrainian Studies Conference (Indiana University)

Deadline: December 15, 2020

The Ukrainian Studies Organization at Indiana University will be holding a second Ukrainian Studies Conference (Taras Shevchenko Conference) which will take place at Indiana University, March 19-20, 2021. Taking into consideration the current uncertainty related to the COVID-19 pandemic, we will announce later if the conference will be online or on campus (Bloomington, IU).

Our conference aims to bring scholars from all disciplines to explore the ways in which Ukrainian studies is presented and shaped in the current political and cultural contexts. In addition to this broad range of topics, we welcome talks and presentations that focus on the exploration of trauma. The events of 2014 ask for the discussion of traumatic experiences triggered by war, dislocation, re-integration into society after military actions, social isolation, sense of lostness, etc. The range of trauma narratives is open (Chornobyl, WWII, deportations, the Holodomor, collectivization, etc.). 

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CFP: Systemic Race and Police Brutality (Slavic and East European Journal)

Deadline: August 31, 2020

In response to AATSEEL’s recent statement concerning systemic racism and police brutality in the United States, Slavic and East European Journal is seeking submissions for a special issue on the politics of race in Slavic, East European and Eurasian literature, film, cultural studies, linguistics, and pedagogy. We envision this cluster addressing three objectives: 1) showcasing cutting-edge research on race studies in our fields and interrogating matters of majority-minority power relations in the context of race and ethnic studies; 2) advancing new curriculum ideas and pedagogical approaches on the topic; 3) highlighting our professions’ impactful community engagement, broadly conceived, related to race studies.

To be considered for the cluster, please submit a 500- to 1,000-word abstract and outline of methods and arguments by August 31. Please also indicate the anticipated length of your essay. Authors of selected abstracts will be notified shortly after that and will be expected to submit complete versions (3,000–8,000 words) by November 30, 2020. Depending on the number of abstracts and anticipated lengths, we plan to publish a cluster of 8–12 pieces.

Sunnie Rucker-Chang (Assistant Professor of Slavic and East European Studies and Director of the European Studies Program, University of Cincinnati) has joined Yana Hashamova (Professor of Slavic Studies, Ohio State University; Editor, SEEJ)  and Alexander Burry (Associate Professor of Slavic Studies, Ohio State University; Co-editor, SEEJ) for the curation and editing of the cluster.

CFP: Vernacular Responses to Covid-19 Pandemic (Folklorica)

Deadline: October 31, 2020

Folklorica, the Journal of the Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Folklore Association, is accepting submissions for a special issue on vernacular responses to the Covid-19 Pandemic.

The Covid-19 Pandemic has sent a ripple through a fraught and interconnected world, drastically shifting global currents towards stasis and seclusion. Countries have shut-down, hospitals have been overwhelmed, people have been relegated to their homes and the world has ground to a halt in a number of ways. It is in such times of crisis as these that folklore becomes a tool to fill the gaps of indeterminacy, to provide comfort, to attempt to explain how and why these events are unfolding and, in more insidious manifestations, to cast blame for the crisis on various real or imagined parties.

We at SEEFA are interested to hear how various parts of the Eastern European and Eurasian world are handling these events and what productive, vernacular arts and practices are flowering in this unusual yet fertile soil. We invite calls for the submission of original articles and field reports regarding Eastern European and Eurasian vernacular responses to the pandemic for an upcoming special issue of Folklorica. Given the scope of our field and the many angles from which articles could approach the material, we are aiming to receive numerous shorter pieces (theoretical musings, preliminary fieldwork reports, smaller articles on specific iterations, and other short, quality work) that will serve as an expanded forum on Eastern European folkloric approaches to the pandemic. 

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CFP: International Conference on Language Documentation & Conservation

Deadline: August 1, 2020 (workshop proposals); September 30, 2020 (general papers)

ICLDC 2021: Workshop and Talk Story proposals 

Following a format introduced at the ICLDC 2017, we are including multiple 90-minute blocks on each day of the conference to be dedicated to two alternative conference activities: Talk Story Sessions and Workshops. 

Presentation formats

Talk Story Sessions: Introduced at ICLDC 2017 in response to participant feedback, ICLDC 2021 will again offer Talk Story sessions. These discussions will be led by an expert discussant and limited to 20-30 attendees per session. Each Talk Story will be repeated on different days of the conference, allowing ample opportunity for conference attendees to participate in the Talk Story Sessions of their choice. Talk Story sessions are meant to be fully interactive for participants, rather than a one-directional presentation of information. This format is particularly appropriate for discussing relationships, how we foster them, maintain them, and better understand their role in language reclamation and language documentation.

Workshops: We also welcome proposals for Workshops on topics broadly relating to the conference theme. Each 90-minute workshop will be repeated on different days of the conference, allowing multiple opportunities for interested attendees to participate. Workshops will accommodate a larger number of participants and are intended to be more presentational and instructional in style than the Talk Story sessions. 

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CFP: Slavic Review Forum on Race and Bias

Deadline: August 15, 2020

Seeking to address current social and political upheaval around systemic racism and to engage with questions of race and bias in our profession, our field, and our research, Slavic Review will host a Critical Discussion Forum, to be published approximately in June 2021. Thus, we are inviting scholars in any phase of the profession to submit abstracts of up to 250 words on any aspect of race in the profession and or race as an object of study in Russia, Eurasia, and Eastern Europe. All disciplines are welcome.

Please send abstracts to the editor, Harriet Murav, at slavrev@illinois.edu by August 15. The organizing committee of this Forum will ask up to 20 authors to develop their abstracts into 3000 word articles, not including footnotes, to be submitted by October 1, 2020.  The completed articles will be peer reviewed.

For more information generally about Slavic Review, see: www.slavicreview.illinois.edu

For questions regarding this Critical Discussion Forum on race and bias, please contact Harriet Murav at slavrev@illinois.edu.

The organizing committee:
Joy Carew (University of Louisville)
Christina Kiaer (Northwestern University)
Harriet Murav (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign)

CFP: Studies in Russian, Eurasian, and Central European New Media

Deadline: July 31, 2020

Call for proposals for a special issue of Digital Icons: Studies in Russian, Eurasian and Central European New Media (www.digitalicons.org)

“Digital Selves: Embodiment and Co-Presence in New Media Cultures in Central Europe and Eurasia” (to be published early summer 2021)

Guest editors: Cassandra Hartblay and Tatiana Klepikova (University of Toronto)

Since the emergence of new media cultures, the theorization of the relationship between embodied positioning in space and our digital personas has evolved in new and significant directions. We have become increasingly aware of the forms of extended, multiple and fragmented selves that are made possible by internet and computer-facilitated settings. New media have championed previously unthinkable practices of self-representation necessitating a change in how researchers understand the virtual traces of our bodies online and the relationship between material bodies and physical spaces.

As of recently, the global pandemic has shifted daily practices and forced many people to seek new, predominantly online, ways of socializing. However, even before this crisis, there were many digital ways of being apart together – developed in minority or marginalized communities. For instance, in mid-March 2020, Russian disability activists started a hashtag campaign, #ButWeAreAlwaysAtHome (#АМыВсегдаДома) seeking to mobilize popular conversations about ‘surviving quarantine’ to highlight ongoing social exclusion of people with disabilities and crip strategies for living at home.

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CFP: Journal of Ukrainian Studies: Cities in Limbo: Katerynoslav–Dnipropetrovsk–Dnipro and Aleksandrovsk–Zaporizhzhia

Deadline: August 15, 2020

For this special issue, authors are encouraged to explore the following issues or other relevant themes connected to the multifaceted nature of the two cities of Dnipro (Dnipropetrovsk) and Zaporizhzhia:

  • Public spaces, landmarks, and architecture and their places in the formation of urban identities;
  • Local and national heroes and antiheroes and the making/unmaking of urban, ethnic, and civic national identities;
  • Correlations between place and regional and national identities of city inhabitants;
  • Historical myths and city legends; 
  • Development of scholarship and science; 
  • Environment and social movements;
  • Images of the cities in literature and cinema; 
  • Official and underground cultures;
  • Social and linguistic landscapes of the cities;
  • Manifestations of religions and beliefs;
  • Russian imperial and Soviet legacies;
  • Frontline cities;
  • Provincialism.

Please submit an abstract of no more than 400 words to Dr. Oleksandr Pankieiev (oleksandr.pankieiev@ualberta.ca) by August 15, 2020. Authors whose abstracts are approved by the guest editors will be invited to submit complete manuscripts of up to 10,000 words, including references, by January 31, 2021.

For more information on East/West: Journal of Ukrainian Studies, see https://www.ewjus.com/. For submission guidelines, please refer to https://www.ewjus.com/index.php/ewjus/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions

CFP: Sustainability and Slavic Studies: Classroom, Research, Profession (AATSEEL)

Deadline: August 1, 2020

We invite you to submit a proposal to our AATSEEL stream, “Sustainability and Slavic Studies: Classroom, Research, Profession.” We envision a combination of panels and roundtables and welcome proposals addressing issues related to the environment and sustainability in research, teaching, and/or the profession in general. Please feel free to get in touch off-list with any questions you may have (jvergar1@swarthmore.edu). 

f you wish to participate, please send your proposal to the Head of the Stream division, Dr. Meghan Murphy-Lee, following the Proposal Guidelines for individual papers.

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CFP: Teaching Culture Through Language

Deadline: August 1, 2020

AATSEEL is organizing the stream on Teaching Culture through Language with the focus on a proficiency-based and student-centered approach.

They would welcome two to three roundtables with examples of how to teach the topics connected with:

Proverbs
Cooking classes
Singing classes
Socialist and post-socialist realia
Everyday life
Holidays and celebrations
“Кто виноват и что делать?”
Urban and village terms
Religious realia
Internet culture and memes
(Post)Imperial way of life
History
Pragmatics
Semiotics

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CFP: Polish Literature as World Literature

Deadline: October 1, 2020

Contact:Piotr Florczyk (University of Southern California)
K. A. Wisniewski (American Antiquarian Society)

Description:
While the concept of world literature remains both elusive and controversial, especially in the eyes of the critics of globalization’s reach into spheres of literary production and dissemination, Polish authors’ engagement with worldly themes and styles is undisputed. Counting no fewer than five Nobel in Literature laureates (six if Isaac Bashevis Singer is included), the Polish literary canon has played a vital role in shaping literary conversations around the world. 
The editors invite chapter abstracts on any subject that falls within the topic of “Polish Literature as World Literature.” This project is planned for Bloomsbury’s “Literatures as World Literature” series.

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