Category Archives: Conferences/Seminars

CFP: 2019 Southern Conference on Slavic Studies (Mobile, AL)

Deadline for Submissions: January 15, 2019

CALL FOR PAPERS 
57th Annual Meeting 
Southern Conference on Slavic Studies
Mobile, AL
March 14-17, 2019
DEADLINE FOR SUBMISSION OF PROPOSALS: January 15, 2019

The Fifty-Seventh Annual Meeting of the Southern Conference on Slavic Studies (SCSS) will be held at the Battle House Renaissance Mobile Hotel & Spa in Mobile, Alabama, March 14-17, 2019. The meeting will be hosted by the University of South Alabama. The SCSS is the largest of the regional Slavic and Eurasian Studies associations and its programs attract national and international scholarly participation. The purpose of SCSS is to promote scholarship, education, and in all other ways to advance scholarly interest in Russian, Soviet, and East European studies in the Southern region of the United States and nationwide. Membership in SCSS is open to all persons interested in furthering these goals.

The John Shelton Curtiss Lecture at the Friday Banquet will be given by Dr. Kate Brown, Professor of History at the University of Maryland-Baltimore County. Dr Brown is the author of numerous critically-acclaimed monographs, including A Biography of No Place (2004), Plutopia (2013), and Dispatches from Dystopia (2015).  Her banquet talk, derived from her forthcoming book, is titled “Manual for Survival: A Chernobyl Guide to the Future.”

Papers from all humanities and social science disciplines are welcome, as is a focus on countries other than Russia/USSR. We encourage participation from scholars of all Slavic, East European, and Eurasian regions. Papers can be on any time period and any topic relevant to these regions. Continue reading

CFP: 57th Annual Conference (SCSS)

Deadline for Submissions: January 15, 2019

CALL FOR PAPERS – 57th Annual Meeting of Southern Conference on Slavic Studies
March 14-17, 2019 in Mobile, AL

The Fifty-Seventh Annual Meeting of the Southern Conference on Slavic Studies (SCSS) will be held at the Battle House Renaissance Mobile Hotel & Spa in Mobile, Alabama, March 14-17, 2019. The meeting will be hosted by the University of South Alabama. The SCSS is the largest of the regional Slavic and Eurasian Studies associations and its programs attract national and international scholarly participation. The purpose of SCSS is to promote scholarship, education, and in all other ways to advance scholarly interest in Russian, Soviet, and East European studies in the Southern region of the United States and nationwide. Membership in SCSS is open to all persons interested in furthering these goals.

The John Shelton Curtiss Lecture at the Friday Banquet will be given by Dr. Kate Brown, Professor of History at the University of Maryland-Baltimore County. Dr Brown is the author of numerous critically-acclaimed monographs, including A Biography of No Place (2004), Plutopia (2013), and Dispatches from Dystopia (2015). Her banquet talk, derived from her forthcoming book, is titled “Manual for Survival: A Chernobyl Guide to the Future.”

Papers from all humanities and social science disciplines are welcome, as is a focus on countries other than Russia/USSR. Participation is encouraged from scholars of all Slavic, East European, and Eurasian regions. Papers can be on any time period and any topic relevant to these regions.

The program committee is accepting panel and paper proposals until January 15, 2019. Whole panel proposals (chair, three papers, discussant) or roundtables (chair and three to five participants) are preferred, but proposals for individual papers will also be accepted. Whole panel proposals should include the titles of each individual paper as well as a title for the panel itself and identifying information (email address and institutional affiliation) for all participants. Roundtable proposals should include a title and identifying information for all participants. Proposals for individual papers should include paper title, identifying information, and a one-paragraph abstract to guide the program committee in the assembly of panels. If any AV equipment will be needed, proposals must indicate so when they are submitted. AV will be of limited availability and assigned on a first-come, first-served basis. Email proposals to Emily Baran at scssprogram@gmail.com.

For local arrangements or conference information other than the program, please contact Mara Kozelsky at mkozelsky@southalabama.edu or Nicholas Gossett at ngossett@southalabama.edu. For questions regarding the program, please contact Emily Baran at scssprogram@gmail.com.

DEADLINE FOR SUBMISSION OF PROPOSALS: January 15, 2019

CFP: Essays on Lenin (Hobart and William Smith Colleges)

Deadline for Submissions: October 31, 2018

Lenin 2020 edited collection—call for abstracts (Oct. 31)

Editors: Alla Ivanchikova (ivanchikova@hws.edu) and Robert Maclean (robertrmaclean@gmail.com)

This edited collection of essays seeks to answer the following question: what does “Lenin” and “Leninism” signify today? What is the future of Leninism? Why, after thirty years of iconoclasm (that involved the removal of statues of Lenin throughout the former socialist world), in spite of concerted efforts to demote, deconstruct, and discredit Leninist mode of thinking, does the specter of Lenin return to haunt our turbulent political present?

Send abstracts of 300-400 words to ivanchikova@hws.edu by October 31, 2018 Continue reading

Conference: Researching and Teaching the EU: Best Practices and Current Trends in EU Scholarship (U. of Illinois)

Date: November 9-10, 2018

Annual EU Studies Conference:
“Researching and Teaching the EU: Best Practices and Current Trends in EU Scholarship”

November 9-10, 2018

University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign
Levis Faculty Center | 919 W Illinois St | Urbana, IL 61801 | [map]
Conference web page | Online registration


Registration deadline: 
Friday, October 12, 2018

Special pre-conference events:

NOVEMBER 9, 2018
17th Annual EU Day 

10:30 am: Annual EU Day Keynote Address: “State of the European Union”
to be delivered by the Ambassador of the European Union to the United States, his Excellency David O’Sullivan
preceded by a welcome reception (10:00 am) and followed by luncheon (12:00 pm)

3:00-4:30 pm: Roundtable: “Elections and US-EU Relations: A Comparative Look at the Elections to the US Congress and the European Parliament and Implications for Transatlantic Relations”

followed by reception (4:30 pm)

Featuring:
former Member of the European Parliament (MEP), Mr. Bob Van den Bos as one of the speakers

Continue reading

CFP: Graduate Student Essay Contest (North American Dostoevsky Society)

Deadline for Submissions: October 01, 2018

The Readers’ Advisory Board of the North American Dostoevsky Society invites members of NADS in good standing to nominate an outstanding graduate-student essay on a Dostoevsky-related topic. (If you are not a member of NADS, you can join at https://dostoevsky.org/). Current M.A. and PhD students are also welcome to nominate their own work, NADS membership not required. The winner of the contest will receive: 1) Free membership in NADS for one year, 2) Free registration at the International Dostoevsky Society Symposium in Boston, July 15-19, 2019 (http://www.bu.edu/wll/dostoevsky-2019/), and 3) a guaranteed spot as a presenter on the NADS-sponsored panel at AATSEEL, 2020.

To submit a nomination, please send an email containing the student’s name, email address, and institutional affiliation, along with a .doc file of the essay (which should be no more than 8000 words in length and contain no identifying information about the author) to Greta Matzner-Gore at matzner@usc.edu by October 1, 2018.

CFP: 1989 in the East : Between Order and Subversion (Paris, France)

Deadline for Submissions: December 01, 2018

First Congress of SFERES
French association for Russian and Eastern European studies in social sciences
(ICCEES member)

1989 in the East : Between Order and Subversion

Organized with the support of CERCEC (Centre d’études des mondes russe, caucasien et centre-européen – EHESS, CNRS), ISP (Institut des sciences sociales du politique – Université Paris Nanterre, ENS Paris Saclay, CNRS), CEFR (Centre d’études franco-russe – MAEE, CNRS), CERI (Centre de recherches internationales – Sciences Po, CNRS), Revue d’études comparatives Est-Ouest (RECEO) and The Journal of Power Institutions in Post-Soviet Societies (PIPSS)

Call for Papers

The political events that unfolded in Eastern Europe around the year 1989 have constituted one of the largest upheavals that the European continent has seen since the end of the Second World War and the dawn of the Cold War. The congress intends to re-examine the processes that led to the disintegration of communist regimes in the countries of Central and Eastern Europe as well as in the Balkans and the USSR. This disintegration appears to be the product of complex mobilizations based on new forms of action and it crossed the most established political borders within Sovietized regimes: between “dissidence” and involvement in the official sphere, between “conventional” political action and street-level mobilization, between national spaces. During this period, the repertories of action, the institutional ties, the ideological preferences, and the actors’ identities, including the most official, have been profoundly changed. The modes of contestation have gone from a self-limited subversion of established institutions, one that could accompany forms of collaboration with the regime, to much clearer and radical head-on opposition. These same oppositions were led by actors often integrated within the system, according to the rhythms and modalities specific to each country (and, in the USSR, to each republic), perhaps to each social sphere, and correlated to the phenomenon of circulation between these spaces. Everything occurred as if the events linked to 1989 had resided in the blurring of routine landmarks of the orderandof the subversion of the “system.”
In spite of the considerable number of research projects dedicated to the “fall of communism,” there are few that systematically examine these transformations in the making, taking into account the entire social field and its blossoming since the second half of the 1980s. The congress seeks to explore these transformations by highlighting their heterogeneity in the different countries and in transcending binary categories of analysis inherited from transitology: power/opposition, conservative/reformer; authoritarianism/democracy; planning system/capitalism, etc. Underscoring the complexity of these processes and the strategic anticipations that they raised at the moment of their unfolding impels the most attentive possible reading of the events to the practices of actors of the different social spheres and to the manner by which the transformations of relationships and the interdependences between these sectors affected the practices. Empirical materials, whether newly available or already known, can thus be questioned or revisited in the light of these methodological requirements. How did the existing order’s actors and institutions adapt or how were they discarded? How did the reconfiguration of the system, using elements of the past, reshape actors’ practices? Which new forms and configurations of competition have emerged? How does one understand the role played by the “grassroots” actors or those situated at the periphery of the elites? Continue reading

CFP: Nabokov Seminar (ACLA)

Deadline for Submissions: September 20, 2018

The 2019 ACLA Conference will take place in Washington DC from March 7–10, 2019 and will be a seminar on the lectures of Vladimir Nabokov.

“The Center of This or That Masterpiece”: Nabokov’s Lectures

Vladimir Nabokov is a staple figure for comparatists interested in translation, self-translation, and polyglot authors—in short, a looming presence in discussions of world literature. But Nabokov himself, in his American years, was busy evaluating translations, reading practices, and the Western canon: assigning grades to various authors (Dostoevsky was a C-) and labeling Proust’s opus a “fairy tale.” This seminar seeks to approach Nabokov through the lectures he delivered to his students at Wellesley and Cornell, collected in Lectures on Literature, Lectures on Russian Literature, and Lectures on Don Quixote. Taking Nabokov-the-Critic as the starting point, attendants will see, first, whether coherent strategies and concerns emerge from his studies; second, whether Nabokov’s fiction resonates with his critical writings; and finally, what new insights he offers into the work of other writers. Mistaken or ingenious, Nabokov’s readings of other novels can—when taken together—offer a model of how expectations and standards can be handed down across time: first to a set of students, and then to readers at large. We welcome papers on any of the lectures—those that focus on literature, translation, or common sense—from scholars primarily interested in Nabokov, the authors he wrote so stridently about, or his pedagogy more generally. Ideally, contributions should think through, theoretically or practically, the ways that a critical piece of writing can become a primary text, a repository of cultural value, a type of adaptation, or a work of art.

Link: https://www.acla.org/center-or-masterpiece-nabokovs-lectures

Abstracts must be received by 9 am EST on Thursday, September 20, 2018. 

CFP: “Kharkiv: The City of Diversity” (EWJUS)

Deadline for Submissions: October 01, 2018

Call for Papers: Special Issue of EWJUS

“Kharkiv: The City of Diversity”

Guest editor: Oleksiy Musiyezdov (V. N. Karazin Kharkiv National University)

Despite several recent studies on Kharkiv (by D. Chornyi, M. Dobchansky, V. Kravchenko, V. Masliychuk, O. Musiyezdov, and others), this city still remains underexplored because it is difficult to explain its historical specificity, and especially because of the manner in which the city and its inhabitants respond to present challenges. The historic fate of Kharkiv gives grounds for various questions: is Kharkiv a Ukrainian or a Russian city? Is it commercial or industrial, metropolitan or provincial, deindustrialized or postmodern? Today Kharkiv can be seen equally as a typical representative of the Ukrainian East—which fortunately did not become another “people’s republic” (following the fates of Luhansk and Donetsk)—and as an outpost of resistance to Russian aggression, with numerous public initiatives and a powerful volunteer movement. The search for answers to questions about Kharkiv often produces stereotypic ideas about the city as a transformed or even distorted representative of a particular cultural canon. Continue reading