CFP: Cultural Biopolitics in Modern Russia

Deadline: January 15, 2021

Proposals are invited for a special issue of Russian Literature dedicated to Cultural Biopolitics in Modern Russia. The term “biopolitics” was coined by Michel Foucault to describe a historical shift that took place in the 17th and 18th centuries, when an earlier concept of sovereignty, grounded in the power to decide when “to take life or let live,” was replaced by one determined by the state’s power “to foster life or disallow it to the point of death.” With the emergence of liberal democracy and modern capitalism, new forms of governmentality appeared that centered on the administration of bodies at the level of the population. From government funded programs to increase birth rates to prohibitions on smoking, euthanasia, and certain kinds of sexual behavior, natural life began to be included in the calculations of the state. Sovereign power increasingly became identified with the management of life. Politics assumed the form of biopolitics.

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CFP: Transcultural Influences in Soviet and Russian Animation, 1917-2020.

Deadline:  January 20, 2021

The goal of this edited collection is to bring together the work of scholars working on Soviet and Russian animation from a transcultural or global perspective. We are interested in a variety of cross-cultural encounters between Soviet and Russian animators and their Western counterparts. Our timeline includes any Soviet cartoons produced between the October Revolution and the fall of the U.S.S.R. as well as their afterlives in the present.  Our aim is to show the complex ways that Soviet/Russian animation industry interacted with the West, broadly defined, and how this interaction changed after 1991.

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CFP: Crisis, Contingency, and the Future of REEES: A Critical Discussion Forum proposal for the Slavic Review

Deadline: December 20, 2020

A Critical Discussion Forum proposal for the Slavic Review [SEE REVISED DEADLINES]

The Working Group for Solidarity in Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies, an ASEEES affiliate group, and the Slavic Review are soliciting submissions for a Critical Discussion Forum on the state of the field and the specific challenges of contingency. Slavic Review will host the forum tentatively titled Crisis, Contingency, and the Future of REEES: Perspectives on the Present and Future of the Field, to be published approximately in the Fall 2021. Contributions to this forum will focus on challenges our field faces, both in confronting the current COVID-19 crisis and grappling with long-lasting structural problems in our field, such as racism, xenophobia, sexism, classism, homo- and transphobia; discrimination based on nationality, ethnicity, and religious affiliation; as well as the lack of employment, housing, and healthcare security.

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Acad. Job: Tutoring Consultant in Russian (Bates College)

Deadline: January 4, 2021

The Department of German and Russian at Bates College is seeking candidates for the position of Tutoring Consultant in Russian for the Winter 2021 semester.

Responsibilities:

  • Scheduling individual and group tutoring sessions with students on Zoom during weekly office hours;
  • Working with individual students and small groups of students in the Russian language courses in Winter 2021 (all levels) to further practice reading, writing, grammar, and pronunciation, to help them understand key language concepts learned in the classroom, and to discuss in-class assignments and texts;
  • Assisting students with homework, course projects, preparation for tests, papers, and other academic tasks;
  • Collaborating with the faculty/supervisor to determine student needs, develop tutoring plans, and assess student progress;
  • Meeting with the faculty/supervisor regularly to discuss the curriculum of the Russian courses.
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American English Program Teaching Positions / Intensive Russian Language Program (American Home, Russia)

Deadline: March 1, 2021

1) American English Program Teaching Positions – Application Deadline March 1, 2021 (NEW WEBSITE: http://www.ah33.ru/teach-english/)

The American English Program has been helping Vladimir residents to learn English since 1992 and currently has more than 600 students each semester who are taught by a group of American and Russian teachers.

PROGRAM BENEFITS: monthly stipend, room and board, three hours per week of one-to-one Russian lessons with faculty trained to teach Russian as a foreign language, thorough teacher orientation and ongoing teaching support from 2 full-time teacher trainers, textbooks customized specifically for our program, a pleasant and well-equipped teaching environment, full Russian visa application support, complete on-site administrative support from an excellent Russian staff, and much more.

TEACHER OBLIGATIONS: Plan and teach four (possibly 5) 1½ hour classes that meet twice a week, hold office hours, present a brief “Saturday lecture” on an aspect of American culture, airfare to and from Moscow, visa fee, TESOL certification.

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Item Writer/Editor Consulting Opportunity (American Councils)

Deadline: Open Until Filled

American Councils for International Education is looking for experienced Item Writer/Editor to work on a federally funded test-item development project for the Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center. The Item Writer/Editor will write multiple choice questions based on an English-language translation in addition to reviewing and revising items throughout the development window. All work will be done remotely through an online item development interface.
Assessment items will be either listening or reading items targeting various levels of proficiency on the ILR scale. Consultants will be provided with training on item development and the item specifications as well as the item-development interface and procedure.

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Job: Research Fellow – Integrated Cybersecurity Studies (UT Austin)

Deadline: Open Until Filled

Job Description: The Robert Strauss Center for International Security & Law at the University of Texas at Austin is offering a two-year fellowship associated with our Integrated Cybersecurity Studies program, as part of the Emerging Tech Policy Leaders Program (ETPL) recently launched by the Cyber Initiative of the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation (Hewlett) in partnership with the Technology and Innovation Program of the Charles Koch Institute (CKI). The ETPL program focuses on early career individuals with leadership potential in connection with technology and cyber policy. During
their first year, the person chosen for the Strauss Center fellowship will work four days per week on the responsibilities outlined below, but will spend the fifth day participating in CKI’s renowned “Koch Associates Program” (a professional development program emphasizing leadership and management skills). During the second year of the position, the fellow will work exclusively for the Strauss Center. Please note: ETPL, Hewlett, CKI, and the Strauss Center actively seek candidates from diverse backgrounds for this position.

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Undergraduate/Graduate Research Paper Awards (Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Folklore Studies Association)

Deadline: May 31, 2021

1)   THE SEEFA AWARD FOR THE BEST UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH PAPER (an
honorarium of US $50)

2)  THE SEEFA AWARD FOR THE BEST GRADUATE RESEARCH PAPER (an honorarium
of US $100)

Winning papers will be considered for publication in SEEFA’s
peer-reviewed journal, Folklorica.
Eligible submissions, whether published or unpublished, must be grounded
in the disciplines of folkloristics, ethnology or related fields and
based on original research connected to any region of Eastern Europe,
Eurasia or its diaspora. Submissions must have been written for a
university course within the 12-month period preceding the submission
deadline of May 31.

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CFP: Cultural Biopolitics in Modern Russia (Russian Literature Journal)

Deadline: January 15, 2021

We invite proposals for a special issue of Russian Literature dedicated to Cultural Biopolitics in Modern Russia.

The term “biopolitics” was coined by Michel Foucault to describe a historical shift that took place in the 17th and 18th centuries, when an earlier concept of sovereignty, grounded in the power to decide when “to take life or let live,” was replaced by one determined by the state’s power “to foster life or disallow it to the point of death.” With the emergence of liberal democracy and modern capitalism, new forms of governmentality appeared that centered on the administration of bodies at the level of the population. From government funded programs to increase birth rates to prohibitions on smoking, euthanasia, and certain kinds of sexual behavior, natural life began to be included in the calculations of the state. Sovereign power increasingly became identified with the management of life. Politics assumed the form of biopolitics.

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CFP: Contagion and Conflagration in Literature

Deadline: February 1, 2021

“During the war people avidly read Tolstoy’s War and Peace as a means of testing their reactions.” So begins Lydia Ginzburg’s The Siege of Leningrad: Notes of a Survivor. Now that the very fiber of our social life has been upended by the pandemic, whose reverberations will be undoubtedly with us for many years to come, the journal Russian Literature proposes to again turn to books for insights on our common predicament. In the Petersburg of Osip Mandelstam’s The Egyptian Stamp, library books “are inhabited by measles, scarlatina, and chicken pox.” Indeed, classics of Russian and East European literature are swarming with infection and more often than not contagion mixes with political conflagration in their fevered collective consciousness. And, even before the era of Covid-19, contemporary literature and film became infested with scenarios in which viruses, both biological and digital, are unleashed, either intentionally or accidentally, by either the West or the East upon the world with catastrophic consequences.

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