North American Dostoevsky Society Student Essay Contest

Deadline: June 15, 2020

The North American Dostoevsky Society (NADS) invites its members in good standing to nominate outstanding student essays on Dostoevsky-related topics. (If you are not a member of NADS, you can join at https://dostoevsky.org/). Students are also welcome to nominate their own work, in which case NADS membership is not required. The topic is open; however, Dostoevsky and his works should be the main focus of the essay.

This year, the contest will take place at two levels—the undergraduate level and the graduate level.

To nominate an undergraduate-student essay, please send an email containing the student’s name, email address, institutional affiliation, and the title and level/number of the course for which the essay was written (e.g. BIOL 322 “Dostoevsky and Spiders”) to Vladimir Ivantsov at vvi1@williams.edu. Please attach the essay to the email as a .pdf file containing no identifying information about the author.  The essay should be no more than 4000 words; 12 font size, double-spaced; it should consistently follow either MLA or Chicago style and contain full bibliographical information on the used sources, either in the footnotes or as a separate list of references.

Continue reading “North American Dostoevsky Society Student Essay Contest”

Outstanding Essay Prize – Central / East / South European Cinema and Media Studies

Deadline: February 28, 2020

The Central / East / South European Cinemas Scholarly Interest Group at the Society of Cinema and Media Studies (SCMS), are pleased to announce the sixth annual prize for an outstanding published essay in the field of Central/East/South European Cinema and Media Studies. Submissions will be judged by a panel of experts, and the winner will be announced at the upcoming 2020 SCMS meeting in Denver, CO. The winner will be awarded a cash prize of $500.
 
Eligibility:
Any single-authored essay on Central / East / South European media published in the field in the calendar year of 2019 as a journal article or a chapter in a collected volume (chapters excerpted from monographs will not be considered).
Essay should be between 6,000 and 9,000 words (with a 10,000 word limit, notes and works cited included). Essays must be published in English.
 
Authors need NOT be members of SCMS at the time of submission.
 
Submission guidelines:
Email nominations should include all bibliographic information about the nominated essay: the author’s name, essay title, exact date and venue for publication, etc. In addition, the email should contain the personal contact address and academic affiliation. Essays should be attached in the email as separate PDF document files. Forward the nomination and all nomination material to Ervin Malakaj (mailto:ervin.malakaj@ubc.ca).
 
Submission deadline is February 28, 2020.

Submissions Wanted: Socrates in Russia

Deadline: April 1, 2020

Socrates in Russia

Editors: Victoria Juharyan (Middlebury College) and Alyssa DeBlasio (Dickinson College)

In a philosophical fragment titled “Socrates in Russia,” the Ukrainian philosopher Gregory Skovoroda (1722-1794) writes: “In Russia there are many men who would be Platos, Aristotles, Zenos, Epicuruses; but they don’t stop to think that the Academy, the Lyceum, and the Stoa developed from the thought of Socrates, as a chick grows from the yolk of an egg. So long as we do not have a Russian Socrates we shall have no Russian Plato or any other philosopher.” Under the guise of a prayer for a Russian Socrates, this fragment reveals Skovoroda’s own self-conception as that very Socrates in Russia. His life and works only reconfirm this notion: Skovoroda left us 33 Platonic dialogues and led the life of a peripatetic philosopher. The introduction to Gregory Skovoroda’s collected works begins with a quote by the legendary Georgian philosopher Merab Mamardashvili (1930-1990), who was himself dubbed as “the Georgian Socrates.” Mamardashvili writes: “…In the history of philosophy, in general, there are these strange cycles, something akin to a play of correspondences… Let’s put it this way: Greek philosophy after all started essentially with Socrates, and for some reason always, when philosophy begins again, it begins with Socrates… Just under a different name… And so, Socratic experience underlies these cycles. It repeats…” There are many other such Socratic figures in the history of Russia’s philosophy, especially as the practice of not writing became an act of resistance against Tsarist and, later, Soviet ideology.

Continue reading “Submissions Wanted: Socrates in Russia”

Call for Submissions: Studi Slavistici Journal

Deadline: May 15, 2020

The journal “Studi Slavistici” is pleased to invite proposals for a special issue to be published in vol. XVIII, 2021, dedicated to the 150th anniversary of the birth of the prominent Ukrainian poetess, playwright, translator Lesya Ukrainka (1871-1913).

The writer has proved herself a bright modernist, whose influence on the development of Ukrainian literature cannot be overestimated. In her writings, problems of democratization of society, national liberation and emancipation were raised. The writer’s style is characterized by intellectualism, intermediality and a wide range of European literary tendencies.

Methodologies of approach to single works and various genres practiced by Lesya Ukrainka may be different, allowing fresh interpretations and deeper knowledge of the writer, her intellectual world, international literary connections, philosophical and artistic views. Her iconic image, overloaded with social and national mythologization may result in a more equilibrated evaluation in our days.

Continue reading “Call for Submissions: Studi Slavistici Journal”

Call for Submissions: Russian Language Journal

Deadline: May 1, 2020

The Russian Language Journal invites submission of articles for inclusion in a special issue dedicated to Digital Humanities, co-edited by Thomas Garza (tjgarza@austin.utexas.edu) and Robert Reynolds (robert_reynolds@byu.edu), to be published Dec 2020.

Submissions should relate to the intersection of any treatment, field, or methodology of Digital Humanities with any topic that falls under the stated scope of the RLJ, including Russian language, culture, and the acquisition of Russian as a second language. Possible topics include, but are not limited to:

  • Digital and computational approaches and applications in literary and linguistic fields, including computational text analysis, stylometry, authorship attribution, digital philology or textual scholarship;
  • Intelligent Computer-Assisted Language Learning (ICALL), including automatic exercise generation, automatic readability/complexity analysis, grammatically intelligent information retrieval or web search, automatic error correction, or intelligent tutoring systems;
  • Automatic assessment of second-language reading, writing, speaking, or listening proficiency;
  • Creation and maintenance of large digital corpora, treebanks, dictionaries, or other digital linguistic resources;
  • Digital approaches in music, film, theatre, and media studies; electronic art and literature, digital activism, etc.;
  • Cultural heritage, digital cultural studies, and research undertaken by digital cultural institutions;
  • Social, cultural, and political aspects of Digital Humanities including digital feminisms, digital indigenous studies, digital cultural and ethnic studies, digital black studies, digital queer studies, digital geopolitical studies, multilingualism and multiculturalism in DH, eco-criticism and environmental humanities as they intersect with the Digital Humanities;
  • Theoretical, epistemological, methodological or historical aspects of Digital Humanities;
  • Institutional aspects of DH, interdisciplinary aspects of scholarship, open science, public humanities, societal engagement and impact of DH;
  • Digital Humanities pedagogy and academic curricula;
  • Any other theme pertaining to the intersection of Digital Humanities and the Russian language.

Contributions may be written in either English or Russian, and should generally be no longer than 7000 words. More detailed explanations regarding submission policies and procedures can be found at http://rlj.americancouncils.org/policies. Submissions should be sent by email to either of the co-editors no later than 1 May 2020.

Robert Reynolds, robert_reynolds@byu.edu

Thomas Garza, tjgarza@austin.utexas.edu

Call for Submissions: Journal for Eastern European and Eurasian Relations

Deadline: January 31, 2020

The Journal for Eastern European and Eurasian Relations is an undergraduate publication of the Swarthmore Project for Eastern European Relations. The journal is a collaborative project between the students at Swarthmore, Haverford, and Bryn Mawr Colleges that seeks to enrich and complicate the conversation surrounding post-Soviet spaces. We are seeking submissions for our first issue focusing on the theme of Activism Under Totalitarianism, which will be published in the Spring of 2020. The Journal will accept historical, literary, political, and cultural analyses as well as creative submissions.
Submission Criteria:

  • Your work must have been completed during undergraduate study.
  • Limit of three submissions per student, per semester.
  • Submissions cannot have been previously submitted to the The Journal nor previously published anywhere.
  • Submissions must be less than twenty double-spaced pages long and preferably no shorter than five.

Each submission accepted for publication is edited by a team of professors and undergraduate editors.Note: Please submit work via this link. You will be required to make an account in order to do so. Please do not email us directly with submissions.
We will give priority to submissions received by January 31st, 2020. 
Please do not hesitate to reach out to the editors with any questions by emailing EasternEuropeanRelations@gmail.com

Call for Submissions: The Legacies of State Socialist Memory Politics

Deadline: December 15, 2019

Canadian Slavonic Papers/ Revue canadienne des slavistes seeks submissions for a special issue on the theme of “The Legacies of State Socialist Memory Politics.” This project will investigate those mnemonic discourses, strategies, and media which, transcending the collapse of state socialism, continue to play a role in contemporary memory politics. The special issue aims to rebalance the discussion in a field that tends to focus on the contemporary determinants of memory: the political and sociocultural vagaries of post-socialism.
After all, mnemonic discourses are path-dependent, and thereby partially disconnected from the political objectives of the present moment. Which narratives of the past survived state socialism and retain a certain degree of resonance? How do they constrain memory actors? Conversely, can they be embraced as a political resource (for instance, by illiberal forces)?

Continue reading “Call for Submissions: The Legacies of State Socialist Memory Politics”

Call for Submissions: Graduate Student Essay Competition (Jordan Center, All the Russias)

Deadline: December 30, 2019

There’s still time to submit! Enter the Jordan Center’s Graduate Student Essay Competition for a chance to get published on All the Russias and win cash prizes.

We invite 750-1200 word submissions from full- or part-time M.A. and Ph.D. students from any accredited academic institution in the United States, on any topic and sub-discipline within Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies, broadly defined. Cultural criticism; public-facing treatments of scholarly work; political analysis; book, film, or event reviews; and more are welcome.

All submissions must be in English and observe the blog’s submission guidelines and full competition rules. Essays are due no later than Monday, December 30, at 11 PM EST and must be submitted via this Google form.

Seven (7) winners will be selected based on their pieces’ originality, clarity, and argumentation, as well as their correspondence to the blog’s general tone and interests as stipulated in the submission guidelines linked above. Winners will receive, respectively, $250 (first prize); $100 (second prize); $50 (third prize); and $25 (runners-up). Winners and runners-up will have their essays published in All the Russias.

Competition results will be announced by February 2020. 

Please direct any questions to alltherussias@gmail.com.

CFP: Ulbandus XX: (re)writing history

Deadline: February 1, 2020

ULBANDUS, the Slavic Review of Columbia University, invites short abstracts (200-300 words) for submissions (of no more than 8,000 words) to be published in our next (and twentieth!) issue, (RE)WRITING HISTORY.

Please send your abstract to ulbandus@columbia.edu by January 15, 2020.

Ulbandus is catalogued on JSTOR and the MLA International Bibliography. We welcome submissions from faculty, graduate students, and independent scholars in any field. Though faculty members sit on the advisory board, the production, editing, and management of Ulbandus is carried out entirely by the graduate students of Columbia University’s Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures.

Continue reading “CFP: Ulbandus XX: (re)writing history”

CFP: The Legacies of State Socialist Memory Politics (Canadian Slavonic Papers/ Revue canadienne des slavistes )

Deadline: December 15, 2019

CfP: Special issue on “The Legacies of State Socialist Memory Politics”
Canadian Slavonic Papers/ Revue canadienne des slavistes seeks submissions for a special issue on the theme of “The Legacies of State Socialist Memory Politics.” This project will investigate those mnemonic discourses, strategies, and media which, transcending the collapse of state socialism, continue to play a role in contemporary memory politics. The special issue aims to rebalance the discussion in a field that tends to focus on the contemporary determinants of memory: the political and sociocultural vagaries of post-socialism.
After all, mnemonic discourses are path-dependent, and thereby partially disconnected from the political objectives of the present moment. Which narratives of the past survived state socialism and retain a certain degree of resonance? How do they constrain memory actors? Conversely, can they be embraced as a political resource (for instance, by illiberal forces)?

Continue reading “CFP: The Legacies of State Socialist Memory Politics (Canadian Slavonic Papers/ Revue canadienne des slavistes )”