2020 Economics Scholars Program (ESP) Undergraduate Research Conference

The 2020 Economics Scholars Program (ESP) Undergraduate Research Conference is fast approaching. The ESP is a collaborative effort between Austin College and the Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas to foster the involvement of undergraduate economics students in all facets of research.  Last year, we topped more than 300 student participants and had over 40 presentations!

 

This year’s conference is scheduled to occur on Friday, March 27, 2020 at the Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas (2200 N. Pearl St., Dallas, TX 75201). A welcome reception will take place the prior evening on March 26.

 

Following are key dates and application requirements (full schedule attached):

 

Wednesday, December 4 Peer Review Board Deadline

 

Peer Review Board applicants must submit:

  • the online application for peer review

 

Monday, February 10 Presentation and Poster Session Proposals Deadline

 

Presentation Session applicants* must submit:

  • the online application for presentation proposals
  • a draft of the paper (it does not need to be a final paper)

 

Poster Session applicants must submit:

  • the online application for poster sessions
  • no draft of the paper is required

 

*Any presentation session proposals not accepted to the conference will be automatically considered for a poster session.

 

Tuesday, February 18 Discussant and Session Chair Applications Deadline

 

Discussant and Session Chair applicants must submit:

  • the online application for Session Chairs and/or Discussants

 

 

We look forward to seeing you at the conference!

 

For registration, information about the conference, and to access the applications please visit https://www.dallasfed.org/outreach/events/2020/20esp.aspx.  If you have any questions, please contact esp@dal.frb.org.

Spring 2020 Economics Course Offerings

Lower-Division Courses

ECO 301. Introduction to Economics.

Instructor(s): Hickenbottom

Flag(s): QR

Introduction to the structure and functioning of the aggregate economy and specific markets, including the labor market, housing market, and financial markets. Basic concepts of market regulation and monetary and fiscal policy. Concepts used in the social and behavioral sciences for measuring and interpreting economic data. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. May not be counted toward a major in economics.

ECO 304K (TCCN: ECON 2302). Introduction to Microeconomics.

Instructor(s): Hickenbottom

Flag(s): QR

Analysis of the economic behavior of individual consumers, firms, and workers. Demand, supply, and market equilibrium. Impact of taxes, externalities, and market power on equilibrium. Three lecture hours a week for one semester, with additional hours to be arranged.

ECO 304L (TCCN: ECON 2301). Introduction to Macroeconomics.

Instructor(s): Mostashari

Flag(s): QR

Analysis of the economy as a whole. Measurement of output, the price level, and employment. Basic theories of the determination of Gross domestic product, investment and growth, and inflation. Introduction to fiscal policy and monetary policy. Three lecture hours a week for one semester, with additional hours to be arranged. Prerequisite: Economics 304K with a grade of at least C-.

 

Upper-Division Courses

ECO 420K. Microeconomic Theory.

Instructor(s): Boyarchenko, Stinchcombe, Thompson

Flag(s): none

Economic theory of the behavior of individuals, households, firms, and markets. Roles of relative prices and information, with a focus on constrained optimization. Four lecture hours a week for one semester. Economics 420K and 421K may not both be counted; required of students majoring in economics. Prerequisite: Economics 304K and 304L with a grade of at least C- in each; Economics 329 with a grade of at least C; and Mathematics 408C and 408D, or 408K and 408L, or 408N and 408S, or 408K and 408S, or 408C and 408L, or 408C and 408S, or 408N and 408L, with a grade of at least C- in each.

 

ECO 320L. Macroeconomic Theory.

Instructor(s): Trinque, Boehm, Sahin, Zervou

Flag(s): none

Theories of the determination of output, employment, and the price level. Basic models of growth. Design of monetary and fiscal policies, and the mechanisms by which they affect the economy. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Required of students majoring in economics. Prerequisite: Economics 420K or 421K with a grade of at least C-.

 

ECO 321. Public Economics.

Instructor(s): Schneider

Flag(s): WR

Study of appropriate allocations of economic activity between government (federal, state, and local) and the private sector. The workings of social security, welfare, education, pollution control, deregulation, taxation; and proposals for reform. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Economics 420K or 421K with a grade of at least C-.

 

ECO 322. Money and Banking.

Instructor(s): Trinque

Flag(s): WR

 

Theories of financial intermediation and the role played by money. Financial policy and monetary policy in theory and practice. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Only one of the following may be counted: Economics 322Finance 354354H. Prerequisite: The following with a grade of at least C-: Economics 420K or 421K, and Economics 320L.

 

ECO 323L. Political Economy.

Instructor(s): Hickenbottom

Flag(s): none

Economic issues in the political arena.  Use of microeconomic tools to study issues associated with collective decision-making, including the role of government in a market economy, and the formulation and implementation of government policies.  Three lecture hours per week for one semester.  Economics 330T (Topic: Political Economy) and Economics 323L may not both be counted.  Prerequisite: Economics 301 with a grade of at least C- or Economics 304K with a grade of at least C-.

 

ECO 326L. Economics of Education.

Instructor(s): Murphy

Flag(s): none

Applications of economic principles and empirical methods to education, including the concept of human capital, economic returns to education, the determinants and measurement of teacher impact, the roles of school inputs and factors outside of school, and the market for higher education. Methodology for evaluating education policy. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Economics 326L and 350K (Topic: Economics of Education) may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Economics 420K or 421K with a grade of at least C-.

 

ECO 327. Comparative Economic Systems.

Instructor(s): Trinque

Flag(s): WR

Economic systems in theory and practice. Role of government and regulation. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Economics 304K and 304L with a grade of at least C- in each.

 

ECO 329. Economic Statistics.

Instructor(s): Bencivenga

Flag(s): QR

Interpretation of economic data. Introduction to statistical models, estimation, and inference in economics. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Only one of the following may be counted: Economics 329Statistics 309309H. Prerequisite: Economics 304K and 304L with a grade of at least C- in each; and Mathematics 408C and 408D, or 408K and 408L, or 408N and 408S, or 408K and 408S, or 408C and 408L, or 408C and 408S, or 408N and 408L, with a grade of at least C- in each.

 

ECO 330T. Topics in Economics. Multiple Topics (see below)

Flag(s): none

Open to nonmajors. Topics cover aspects of economic theory, applications, and policy. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Economics 330T and 350K may not both be counted unless the topics vary. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Economics 304K with a grade of at least C-; additional prerequisites may vary with the topic.

 

Econ of European Union- Bencivenga

To understand the economic and political situation in Europe and Europe’s policy debates (including Brexit), we will study relevant aspects of international trade, international finance, monetary theory, and banking.  Our topics include gains and losses due to international trade (including different trade arrangements, such as the Single Market and how it differs from a customs union and WTO rules); the euro (its history, why the EU wanted a common currency, and whether the euro zone meets the criteria for an optimal currency area); international borrowing and lending within the euro zone (why it was supposed to create convergence, why this did not occur, and what allowed excessive government borrowing by Greece); the “doom loop”, bank runs, and bank bailouts; and the causes of sovereign debt crises.  At the end of this course, students will have a comprehensive understanding of how and why the policy issues faced by the EU arose and the debates over possible resolutions.

Gender/Race/Ethnicity- Oettinger

First, the course will describe in detail the many large and persistent differences in economic outcomes both between the genders and between the major race/ethnicity groups (whites, blacks, Hispanics, and Asians) in the U.S. Second, the course will present and critically discuss the major economic models that have been proposed to explain the between-group differences that we observe. Third, the course will discuss the existing empirical evidence for the models — as well as the dimensions in which the models fall short and the important questions that the existing models do not yet answer or address.

 

Outside the Market- Wiseman

In this course we will study two questions. First, is maximizing total surplus the right way of thinking about what is “good” for society, and specifically how should we evaluate a policy that is good for some members of society and bad for others? Second, many social interactions take place outside of market environments. Can we still use economic analysis to understand behavior in those settings and to design rules that will lead to better outcomes?

 

ECO 333K. Development Economics.

Instructor(s): Linden

Flag(s): GC

Same as Urban Studies 351 (Topic 4). Introduction to theories of economic development. Economic analysis of leading issues. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Only one of the following may be counted: Economics 333KUrban Studies 351 (Topic: Development Economics), 351 (Topic 4). Prerequisite: Economics 420K or 421K with a grade of at least C-.

 

ECO 334K. Urban Economics.

Instructor(s): Ikizler

Flag(s): none

Same as Urban Studies 351 (Topic 2). Economic analysis of urban areas, emphasizing current problems, such as spatial concentration of poverty, lack of access to jobs and financial services, and transportation systems. Examines the role of policy in addressing these problems. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Economics 334K and Urban Studies 351 (Topic 2) may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Economics 420K or 421K with a grade of at least C-.

 

ECO 335K. Energy Economics.

Instructor(s): Sadler

Flag(s): none

Economic analysis of the markets for resources that supply energy, including coal, oil, natural gas, and shale gas, and the market for electricity. Principles of valuation and optimal dynamic allocation of energy resources. Financial contracts and risk management in energy markets. Regulation of energy markets. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Economics 335K and 350K (Topic: Energy Economics) may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Economics 420K with a grade of at least C-.

 

ECO 339L. International Finance.

Instructor(s): Bhattarai

Flag(s): none

Exchange rates and foreign exchange markets; reasons for financial globalization; open-economy macroeconomics; exchange rate regimes (fixed and floating exchange rates, currency boards, and currency areas such as the euro zone); central bank accumulation of foreign exchange reserves; and sovereign debt crises and currency crashes. Reasons for different exchange rate arrangements and other policies are explored. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Economics 420K or 421K with a grade of at least C-, and 320L with a grade of at least C-.

 

ECO 441K. Introduction to Econometrics.

Instructor(s): Trejo, Kline

Flag(s): QR, II, WR (upper division)

Parameter estimation and inference in regression models. For each semester hour of credit earned, the equivalent of one lecture hour a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Economics 329 and 420K with a grade of at least C- in each.

 

ECO 349K. Topics in Applied Economics. Topic: Entrepreneurship

Instructor(s): Ackerberg

Flag(s): none

This course applies insights from economic theory to the practice of starting a new business or expanding a current business. The course combines elements of strategy, marketing, and entrepreneurial finance courses as typically taught in a business school and industrial organization and econometrics courses as taught in an economics department. We start by examining general issues regarding entrepreneurship, in particular the evaluation of markets for the potential for entrepreneurial profits. The next section turns to specific strategic decisions that entrepreneurs make: pricing, advertising, product location, deterring entry by competitors, etc. The last section examines practical issues in entrepreneurship, e.g. finding capital, business plans, patent protection, negotiation, employee compensation, and auctions as a transactional mechanism. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Economics 420K with a grade of at least C-; additional prerequisites may vary with the topic.

 

ECO 350K. Advanced Topics in Economics. Topic: Federal Income Taxation in US

Instructor(s): Manoli

Flag(s): none

This course will study federal income tax administration in the United States. The course will systematically go through a federal income tax return (IRS Form 1040) so that students will learn rules for filing tax returns, how to compute federal income tax liability, issues of tax compliance and eligibility conditions for various tax benefits such as the Earned Income Tax Credit and tax-based financial aid for college. The course will also discuss how the administration of federal income tax programs affect individuals’ economic decisions. Students are expected to come away from the course with a broad understanding of how the federal income tax system functions in the United States, and this broad understanding will be relevant to both personal finance and careers involving expertise in income taxation. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Economics 330T and 350K may not both be counted unless the topics vary. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Economics 420K with a grade of at least C-; additional prerequisites may vary with the topic.

 

ECO 351N.  Economic Principles of Managerial Decisions.

Instructor(s): Hatfield

Flag(s): none

Use of economic concepts and models to make strategic business decisions (adverse selection, game theory, price discrimination, strategic commitment, barriers to entry, network effects).  Economics of strategic responses to the legal environment (regulations, antitrust policies, intellectual property, fiduciary duty, liability).  Three lecture hours for one semester.  Only one of the following may be counted:  Economics 351N, ECO 350K (Topic:  Economic Principles of Managerial Decisions), Economics 330T (Topic: Economic Principles of Managerial Decisions), FIN 372.  Prerequisite:  Economics 420K or 421K with a grade of at least C-.

 

ECO 352K. Business Strategy.

Instructor(s): Sibley

Flag(s): none

Economic analysis of business strategy, including introducing new products, vertically integrating, bundling goods, pricing, distribution, mergers, and product differentiation. Relevant aspects of antitrust law. Case studies of specific firms. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Economics 350K (Topic: Business Strategy) and 352K may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Economics 420K with a grade of at least C-.

 

ECO 353K. Antitrust Law and Economics.

Instructor(s): Sibley

Flag(s): none

Economic analysis of antitrust law intended to deter firms from engaging in anti-competitive conduct that harms consumers, including mergers that impede competition, price-fixing, and anti-competitive practices by a dominant firm in an industry. Focus on various industries and select antitrust cases. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Economics 350K (Topic: Antitrust Law and Economics) and Economics 353K may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Economics 420K with a grade of at least C-.

 

ECO 354K. Introductory Game Theory.

Instructor(s): Thomas

Flag(s): QR

Introduction to the formal study of interdependent decision making. Applications of game theory include pricing and advertising strategies, labor-management bargaining, and tariff negotiations. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Economics 420K and 329 with a grade of at least C- in each.

 

 

Additional Course/Instructor Information:

 

UT Syllabi (future semesters will not be posted, look for same course/instructor for current/past semesters to get approximate info)

Course Instructor Survey Results (results from surveys administered in class at end of semester in previous semesters)

Grade distributions (for all UT classes and professors via Natural Sciences Council fall 2013 through spring 2018)

Spring 2020 Economics Course FAQs—COMING SOON!

Summer and Fall 2019 Registration is Coming

Summer & Fall 2019 Registration is from April 22 – May 3

 

Hello Economics Majors!

 

YOUR REGISTRATION TIME will be somewhere between April 22-May 2. Check your specific ACCESS TIMES and REGISTRATION BARS on your Registration Information Sheet.

 

Registration advising is NOT required for Economics majors (unless below 2.0 GPA or new to the major).

 

Optional registration advising is available now!  To schedule an appointment, book online or call (512-471-2973), or come for a walk-in (see walk-in schedule here). Registration advising sessions are quick 20-minute meetings to go over your summer/fall schedule only. Come prepared with your questions! Long-term planning advising will resume in May.

 

The Econ Help Desk staff can help you with registration issues and quick questions (BRB 1.114, 512-471-2973). Call or come by with your questions!

 


HERE IS HOW YOU CAN PREPARE YOURSELF FOR REGISTRATION:

 

  1. Check your Registration Information Sheet (RIS) to find out your registration times and see if you have any registration bars.
  2. Review your Degree Audit to see which degree requirements you still need to meet.
    • Click the “Access IDA Now” button. Then click on “Audit Results” on the left-hand side—there should already be a recent audit there for you to review. You can rerun audits as needed.
  3. Look at your degree plan to review degree requirements (you must select your catalog)
    • Find the 2019-2020 University and Liberal Arts Core Course List here.
  4. Review the Course Schedule to explore class options.
  5. Check credit-by-exam you can claim (click on “View Scores Claim Credit” from right-hand menu).
  6. Research classes and make a schedule. The following resources and tools may be helpful:
  1. AVOID GETTING DROPPED FROM YOUR CLASSES! Your registration is not complete until you have go to My Tuition Billand make arrangements to have your tuition bill paid or confirmed your attendance (even if your fee bill is $0). If you neglect to do this, you will be dropped from all of your classes! Go here (summer) or here (fall) to make sure you know when and what to do, to complete registration and keep your classes.

 


Important Stuff to Know!

 

  1. Economics course prerequisites are strictly enforced. Proof of completed credit is required before you can register in (most) ECO courses. If you have trouble getting your credit posted, be sure to contact the Econ Help Desk (BRB 1.114) for guidance before the first class day. If you register in an ECO course and then do not meet the stated prerequisites by the time classes start, you will be dropped.

 

  1. ECO Online and Paper Waitlists Info: The ECO online waitlists will be turned on as soon as a class fills up. If a class is listed as “closed” on the course schedule that usually means the online waitlist is full. You cannot get permission from the instructor to add a closed or waitlisted ECO class. We will start a paper waitlist (for ECO courses only) in the Economics Advising Office at 8:30 am on the 5th class day in Fall semester (3rd class day in Summer). You must come in-person to get on the paper waitlist.

 

  1. If you have trouble/questions-about adding a class in another department, you must contact the offering department. Find department phone numbers here.

 

  1. Priority for Graduating Seniors: If you are graduating in summer or fall 19 and are unable to register for an ECO class you need to graduate—come to walk-in advising as soon as possible! The sooner you come in, the better the chances we can help you. Please note, if you have other options for satisfying your requirement, we will refer you to the online/paper waitlist for the preferred course.

 

  1. No more than 3 ECO courses allowed in a single semester (strictly enforced).

 

  1. Concurrent Enrollment in ECO 420K Microeconomics Theory and ECO 441K Econometrics requires advisor approval. This is a challenging load, we recommend that you do not do this unless necessary for on-time graduation. To be eligible you must have credit (with a grade of at least C minus), be currently taking, or be registered for fall 19 in ECO 420K. For approval, come in-person to the Econ Help Desk (BRB 1.114).

 

  1. If you intend to take ECO 420K, ECO 441K, and another ECO course— you will need an override, because this combination of courses equals 11 credit hours and the system will only let you register for 10 credit hours of ECO. In this situation, please register yourself in two of the ECO courses and go to the Economics Advising Office during your registration access time for assistance adding the third course (the course must have an open seat! We will not add you to a full class). Please note, the registration system may not let you register for any other courses (in any subject) once we add you to the third ECO class.

 

  1. Want to get an internship or job next year? Get prepared for the job search by taking LA 101M Liberal Arts to Career in fall 19, or LA 101M Economics to Career in spring 20.

 

  1. The following courses no longer count as subs for ECO 329 toward the major (if taken in spring 18 or later): SDS 321, M 358K, EE 351K, PGE 337.

 


Plan Ahead!

 

  1. If you plan to pursue the Business Economics Option Program (BEOP) but are not yet eligible to apply, you can still possibly take ACC 311, and then ACC 312, by submitting an Enrollment Control Petition through McCombs.

 

  1. The following courses are no longer offered in summers:  ECO 420K and ECO 341K/441K.

 

  1. We will begin scheduling long-term planning appointments again May 6th.

 

 

 

Good luck with registration from the Economics Advising Team!