Previous Research

Impact Assessment of Urban Decline on Coupled Human and Water Sector infrastructure Systems

NSF Graduate Fellow, Purdue University, 08/2011-05/2015
Research supervisor: Professor Dulcy M. Abraham
PhD Dissertation: Impact Assessment of Urban Decline on Coupled Human and Water Sector Infrastructure Systems

  • Developed water and wastewater models and applied a set of identified metrics (e.g., adequate pressures, emergency services, reduction of flows that are able to evaluate the performance, due to population and demand decline, of water and wastewater to allows for comparison of infrastructure management scenarios, such as decommissioning, razing, or further population decline
  • Quantified the impact of demographic factors on public perception of water and wastewater infrastructure issues and alternatives in shrinking cities to identify management methods that are likely to be the most sustainable and implementable, yielding the least opposition by the public
  • Evaluated the interdependent relationships between water and wastewater infrastructure from a physical and managerial standpoint

 

Safety of Nighttime Construction Operations

Graduate Research Assistant, Purdue University, 09/2010-5/2011
Research supervisor: Professor Dulcy M. Abraham
Project: Safety of Nighttime Construction Operations (funded by Nighttime institute for Occupational Safety and Health Grant No. 1 R01 0H07553)

  • Involved in editing and verifying the content, and integrating and formatting the content into the online learning modules of the two research-to-practice (R2P) project deliverables: safety training modules and decision support tools for nighttime construction safety alternatives.

 

System-of-Systems Approach to Water Infrastructure Decisions
Graduate Research Assistant, Purdue University, 09/2009-12/2010
Research supervisor: Professor Dulcy M. Abraham
Master’s Thesis: System-of-Systems Approach to Water Infrastructure Decisions using

  • Developed a framework, using system-of-system analysis, econometric modeling, and analytical hierarchy process to incorporate stakeholder perceptions into capital-intensive water infrastructure decisions
  • Identified individual demographics and stakeholder affiliations that increase and decrease public opposition, and determined which alternative (among a set of alternatives) is most likely to have the least amount of public opposition among specified stakeholders

 

Undergraduate Research Assistant, University of Washington, 09/2007-09/2008
Research supervisor: Professor Denise Wilson, Department of Electrical Engineering

  • Evaluated the anomalous soil conditions and drinking water quality around Seattle and the Gulf Coast through collecting field data and analyzing the data using lasers and established testing methods
  • Tested Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) trailers for Formaldehyde and other volatile organic compounds (VOC)s in the Gulf Coast in November 2007
  • Tested the drinking water, the surface water, and soil for arsenic levels surface water in New Orleans, LA and Biloxi, MI