Activites

The overall scope of the IAG working Group: Tropical Rivers -Geomorphology, Impacts, Hazards and Management and the working group Tropical rivers of IAG is the study of morphodynamic processes in tropical rivers and to provide an integrated assessment of long-term direct impacts of climate variability and human-induced change and management of tropical rivers basins by identification, quantification and modeling of key hydro-geomorphologic indicators during the past and present times. The potential impacts of global change on fluvial systems and of their socio-economic implications and flood hazards are also analyzed. Several of the largest and many of the most vulnerable rivers of the world are located in the equatorial and monsoonal region as well as some of the most active areas of fluvial sedimentation and erosion of the planet. We welcome in this working group contributions on the Quaternary history, morphodynamics, hydro-geomorphology, hazards and management of tropical rivers.

River Coastal and Estuarine Morphodynamics 9th Symposium 

The International Association of Geomorphologist ( IAG) Working Group on Tropical River will participate in the 9th Symposium on River, Coastal and Estuarine Morphodynamics, RCEM 2015 to be held in Iquitos City, from August 30 to September 3, 2015.  The Program is underdevelopment and papers/special sessions will be posted here when finalized.  http://www.crearamazonia.org/rcem2015/

 Short Courses at River Coastal and Estuarine Morphodynamics 9th Symposium 

RCEM 2015 has multiple short courses offer: August 10-August 21, 2015 – Iquitos CREAR-ED-SPA: Ciencia, Cultura y Tecnología para el Conocimiento de la Amazonia (In Spanish) CREAR and SHNA

  • IRIC: Numerical Modeling of Rivers
    August 25-August 26, 2015 – Lima
    Dr. Nelson, National Research Program, USGS, USA
    Dr. Shimizu2, Hokkaido University, Japan
  • Monitoring flow, discharge, turbulence and suspended sediment from ADCPs
    August 28-August 30, 2015 – Iquitos
    Dr. A.J.F. Hoitink – Department of Environmental Sciences, Wageningen University, The Netherlands
    Dr. R.N. Szupian – National University of Litoral, Santa Fe, Argentina
    B. Vermeulen, MSc – Department of Environmental Sciences, Wageningen University, The Netherlands
  • 2D and 3D Modeling of Flow and Bed Morphodynamics using TELEMAC
    August 28-August 30, 2015 – Iquitos
    Dr. P. Tassi – EDF R&D, National Laboratory for Hydraulics en Environment, Chatou, France and Saint Venant Laboratory for Hydraulics, Chatou, France
    Dr. R. Ata – EDF R&D, National Laboratory for Hydraulics en Environment, Chatou, France and Saint Venant Laboratory for Hydraulics, Chatou, France
    Dr. K. El Kadi Abderrezzak – EDF R&D, National Laboratory for Hydraulics en Environment, Chatou, France and Saint Venant Laboratory for Hydraulics, Chatou, France
    Dr. A. Mendoza -National Autonomous University of Mexico, Federal District, Mexico and University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, USA
    Dr. E.J. Langendoen – US Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, National Sedimentation Laboratory, Oxford, MS, USA
  • How Machine Learning Can Help Morphodynamics
    August 29, 2015 – Iquitos
    Giovanni Coco – Faculty of Science, University of Auckland, New Zealand
    Evan Goldstein – Department of Geological Sciences, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, USA
  • The Amazon River from late Tertiary to present: paleogeographic reorganization of the basin, Quaternary record and present morphodynamics
    September 4, 2015 – Iquitos
    Dr. Latrubesse -Department of Geography and the Environment, The University of Texas at Austin, USA

American Geophysical Union (AGU) – 2014  Fall meeting San Francisco

Several activities were developed during 2014. The most remarkable was organizing the American Geophysical Union AGU-Fall meeting San Francisco, titled EP54A Multiscale and Multidisciplinary Fluvial Research in Tropical Regions, which was coordinated by E. Latrubesse, (UT-Austin), J. Abad (Univ. Pittsburgh) and T. Hoitink (Wageningen University). The session included contributions from tropical South America, SE. Asia, Australia, and India and important rivers such as the Mekong, Amazon, Araguaia, Murray, Fly, Mahakam, and others were discussed. Researchers from Australia, Bolivia, Brazil, India, New Zealand, the Netherlands, Peru, Thailand, UK and USA contributed to our session.  Our IAG-working group co-chair, Rajiv Sinha (IITK) offered one of the invited talks, synthesizing the state of the art of the geomorphological knowledge of the Ganges basin.

Papers

    • EP54A-01 Biogeochemical patchiness, geomorphic feedbacks, and flow connectivity in river-floodplain corridors (Invited) Laurel Larsen, University of California Berkeley, Berkeley, CA, United States, Jud W Harvey, USGS Headquarters, Reston, VA, United States and Morgan Maglio, USGS Wisconsin Water Science Center, Middleton, WI, United States
    • EP54A-02 Sediment dynamics within the intertidal floodplain of the lower Amazon River Aaron T Fricke1, Charles A Nittrouer1, Andrea S Ogston1, Daniel J. Nowacki1, Nils E Asp2and Pedro Walfir Souza Filho3, (1)University of Washington, Seattle, WA, United States, (2)Universidade Federal do Pará, Institute for Coastal Studies, Bragança, Pará, Brazil, (3)Universidade Federal do Pará, Departamento de Geologia, Belém, Pará, Brazil
    • EP54A-03 A Multi-temporal MODIS Based Platform to Analyze Suspended Sediment Distribution Patterns in the Amazon River Edward Park and Edgardo M Latrubesse, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX, United States
    • EP54A-04 Documenting spatial diversity and complexity in a large tropical river system: implications for river health and management (Invited) Rajiv Sinha, Haridas Mohanta and Sampat K Tandon, Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur, India
    • EP54A-05 Cyclone Driven Sediment Loads in a Tropical Mega-River (Invited) Stephen E Darby1, Julian Leyland1, Christopher R Hackney2, Eleanore Heasley2, Matti Kummu3, Hannu Lauri3, Daniel R Parsons4, Andrew Paul Nicholas5, Rolf E Aalto6and Jim Best7, (1)University of Southampton, Southampton, SO14, United Kingdom, (2)University of Southampton, Southampton, United Kingdom, (3)Aalto University, Aalto, Finland, (4)University of Hull, Hull, HU6, United Kingdom, (5)University of Exeter, Exeter, United Kingdom, (6)University of Exeter, Geography, Exeter, EX4, United Kingdom, (7)University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign, Urbana, IL, United States
    • EP54A-06 Uncertainty and variability in sediment loads in the largest tributary of the Mekong Basin using the Soil and Water Assessment Tool Mauricio Eduardo Arias1,2, Ornanorg Vonnarart3, Thomas A Cochrane1, Thanapon Piman1,3and Dat Nguyen Dinh3, (1)University of Canterbury, Christchurch, New Zealand, (2)Harvard University, Kennedy School of Goverment and Department of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology, Cambridge, MA, United States, (3)Mekong River Commission, Bangkok, Thailand
    • EP54A-07 Assessing Timescales and Controls of Floodplain Evolution in Monsoonal Australia during the Late Quaternary

Posters

    • EP51D-3556 ANDEAN BASINS MORPHOMETRY: ASSESING SOUTH AMERICAN LARGE RIVERS’ SOURCE AREAS Robert A Bean, University of Texas at Austin, Geography and the Environment, Austin, TX, United States and Edgardo M Latrubesse, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX, United States
    • EP51D-3550 Characterising the Geomorphic Response of a Tropical Mega-River to an Extreme, Cyclone Induced, Flood Event. Christopher R Hackney1, Julian Leyland2, Stephen E Darby2, Daniel R Parsons3, Rolf E Aalto4, Andrew Paul Nicholas5and Jim Best6, (1)University of Southampton, Southampton, United Kingdom, (2)University of Southampton, Southampton, SO14, United Kingdom, (3)University of Hull, Hull, HU6, United Kingdom, (4)University of Exeter, Geography, Exeter, EX4, United Kingdom, (5)University of Exeter, Exeter, United Kingdom, (6)University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign, Geography, Mechanical Science and Engineering and Ven Te Chow Hydrosystems Laboratory, Urbana, IL, United States
    • EP51D-3552 Assesing Hydrophysical/Enivornmenal impacts by Dams in the Amazon (fluvial) Basin Charles Wightand Edgardo M Latrubesse, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX, United States
    • EP51D-3553 Rivers as Political Boundaries: Peru and its Dynamic BordersCatalina Escobar1Jorge D Abad1, Adrian Mikhail Palaci Garcia1, Collin Ortals1, Christian E Frias1and Jorge Vizcarra2, (1)University of Pittsburgh Pittsburgh Campus, Pittsburgh, PA, United States, (2)Peruvian Navy, Lima, Peru
    • EP51D-3554 Change of flooding patterns in the upper Amazon as a consequence of river regime change, a case study of Iquitos city Cesar A Simon1, Alejandro Mendoza1, Jorge D Abad1and Eddy J Langendoen2, (1)University of Pittsburgh Pittsburgh Campus, Pittsburgh, PA, United States, (2)USDA-ARS National Sedimentation Laboratory, Oxford, MS, United States
    • EP51D-3555 Conceptual Morphologic Consideration for Long-term Hydrodynamics Simulation in the Pirai River in Santa Cruz-Bolivia Mauricio Florencio Villazon, San Simon University, Civil Engineering, Cochabamba, Bolivia
    • EP51D-3551 Defining Fluvial Megafans through Geomorphic Mapping and Metrics Moulay Anwar Sounny-Slitine, Southwestern University, Georgetown, TX, United States and Edgardo M Latrubesse, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX, United States
    • EP51D-3557 Hydrology and Sediment Transport in a Highly Impacted Large Tropical River for Deforestation: The Araguaia, Central Brazil Samia Aquino and Edgardo M Latrubesse, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX, United States
    • EP51D-3558 The Birthplace of the Amazon River, the Confluence of the Maranon and Ucayali Rivers Jorge D Abad1, Collin Ortals1, Jorge Paredes2and Jorge Vizcarra3, (1)University of Pittsburgh Pittsburgh Campus, Pittsburgh, PA, United States, (2)Service of Hydrography and Navigation, Iquitos, Peru, (3)Peruvian Navy, Lima, Peru
    • EP51D-3559 Insight on the Peruvian Amazon River: A Planform Metric Characterization of its Morphodynamics Adrian Mikhail Palaci Garcia1, Collin Ortals1, Christian E Frias1, Jorge D Abad1and Jorge Vizcarra2, (1)University of Pittsburgh Pittsburgh Campus, Pittsburgh, PA, United States, (2)Peruvian Navy, Service of Hydrography and Navigation of the Amazon, Lima, Peru
    • EP51D-3560 Anabranching Channel Patterns: the Kingdom of Large Alluvial Rivers Edgardo M Latrubesse, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX, United States
    • EP51D-3561 Anabranching Flume Experiments, How Channel Pattern Affect Bed Morphology Jiaoli Ren, Christian E Frias, Catalina Escobar and Jorge D Abad, University of Pittsburgh Pittsburgh Campus, Pittsburgh, PA, United States Download ePoster