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Using hardware performance counters to determine how often both logical processors are active on an Intel CPU

Posted by John D. McCalpin, Ph.D. on 17th September 2018

Most Intel microprocessors support “HyperThreading” (Intel’s trademark for their implementation of “simultaneous multithreading”) — which allows the hardware to support (typically) two “Logical Processors” for each physical core. Processes running on the two Logical Processors share most of the processor resources (particularly caches and execution units). Some workloads (particularly heterogeneous ones) benefit from assigning processes to all logical processors, while other workloads (particularly homogeneous workloads, or cache-capacity-sensitive workloads) provide the best performance when running only one process on each physical core (i.e., leaving half of the Logical Processors idle).

Last year I was trying to diagnose a mild slowdown in a code, and wanted to be able to use the hardware performance counters to divide processor activity into four categories:

  1. Neither Logical Processor active
  2. Logical Processor 0 Active, Logical Processor 1 Inactive
  3. Logical Processor 0 Inactive, Logical Processor 1 Active
  4. Both Logical Processors Active

It was not immediately obvious how to obtain this split from the available performance counters.

Every recent Intel processor has:

  • An invariant, non-stop Time Stamp Counter (TSC)
  • Three “fixed-function” performance counters per logical processor
    1. Fixed-Function Counter 0: Instructions retired (not used here)
    2. Fixed-Function Counter 1: Actual Cycles Not Halted
    3. Fixed-Function Counter 2: Reference Cycles Not Halted
  • Two or more (typically 4) programmable performance counters per logical processor
    • A few of the “events” are common across all processors, but most are model-specific.

The fixed-function “Reference Cycles Not Halted” counter increments at the same rate as the TSC, but only while the Logical Processor is not halted. So for any interval, I can divide the change in Reference Cycles Not Halted by the change in the TSC to get the “utilization” — the fraction of the time that the Logical Processor was Not Halted. This value can be computed independently for each Logical Processor, but more information is needed to assign cycles to the four categories.   There are some special cases where partial information is available — for example, if the “utilization” is close to 1.0 for both  Logical Processors for an interval, then the processor must have had “Both Logical Processors Active” (category 4) for most of that interval.    On the other hand, if the utilization on each Logical Processor was close to 0.5 for an interval, the two logical processors could have been active at the same time for 1/2 of the cycles (50% idle + 50% both active), or the two logical processors could have been active at separate times (50% logical processor 0 only + 50% logical processor 1 only), or somewhere in between.

Both the fixed-function counters and the programmable counters have a configuration bit called “AnyThread” that, when set, causes the counter to increment if the corresponding event occurs on any logical processor of the core.  This is definitely going to be helpful, but the both the algebra and the specific programming of the counters have some subtleties….

The first subtlety is related to some confusing changes in the clocks of various processors and how the performance counter values are scaled.

  • The TSC increments at a fixed rate.
    • For most Intel processors this rate is the same as the “nominal” processor frequency.
      • Starting with Skylake (client) processors, the story is complicated and I won’t go into it here.
    • It is not clear exactly how often (or how much) the TSC is incremented, since the hardware instruction to read the TSC (RDTSC) requires between ~20 and ~40 cycles to execute, depending on the processor frequency and processor generation.
  • The Fixed-Function “Unhalted Reference Cycles” counts at the same rate as the TSC, but only when the processor is not halted.
    • Unlike the TSC, the Fixed-Function “Unhalted Reference Cycles” counter increments by a fixed amount at each increment of a slower clock.
    • For Nehalem and Westmere processors, the slower clock was a 133 MHz reference clock.
    • For Sandy Bridge through Broadwell processors, the “slower clock” was the 100 MHz reference clock referred to as the “XCLK”.
      • This clock was also used in the definition of the processor frequencies.
      • For example, the Xeon E5-2680 processor had a nominal frequency of 2.7 GHz, so the TSC would increment (more-or-less continuously) at 2.7 GHz, while the Fixed-Function “Unhalted Reference Cycles” counter would increment by 27 once every 10 ns (i.e., once every tick of the 100 MHz XCLK).
    • For Skylake and newer processors, the processor frequencies are still defined in reference to a 100 MHz reference clock, but the Fixed-Function “Unhalted Reference Cycles” counter is incremented less frequently.
      • For the Xeon Platinum 8160 (nominally 2.1 GHz), the 25 MHz “core crystal clock” is used, so the counter increments by 84 once every 40 ns, rather than by 21 once every 10 ns.
  • The programmable performance counter event that most closely corresponds to the Fixed-Function “Unhalted Reference Cycles” counter has changed names and definitions several times
    • Nehalem & Westmere: “CPU_CLK_UNHALTED.REF_P” increments at the same rate as the TSC when the processor is not halted.
      • No additional scaling needed.
    • Sandy Bridge through Broadwell: “CPU_CLK_THREAD_UNHALTED.REF_XCLK” increments at the rate of the 100 MHz XCLK (not scaled!) when the processor is not halted.
      • Results must be scaled by the base CPU ratio.
    • Skylake and newer: “CPU_CLK_UNHALTED.REF_XCLK” increments at the rate of the “core crystal clock” (25 MHz on Xeon Scalable processors) when the processor is not halted.
      • Note that the name still includes “XCLK”, but the definition has changed!
      • Results must be scaled by 4 times the base CPU ratio.

Once the scaling for the programmable performance counter event is handled correctly, we get to move on to the algebra of converting the measurements from what is available to what I want.

For each interval, I assume that I have the following measurements before and after, with the measurements taken as close to simultaneously as possible on the two Logical Processors:

  • TSC (on either logical processor)
  • Fixed-Function “Unhalted Reference Cycles” (on each logical processor)
  • Programmable CPU_CLK_UNHALTED.REF_XCLK with the “AnyThread” bit set (on either Logical Processor)

So each Logical Processor makes two measurements, but they are asymmetric.

From these results, the algebra required to split the counts into the desired categories is not entirely obvious.  I eventually worked up the following sequence:

  1. Neither Logical Processor Active == Elapsed TSC – CPU_CLK_UNHALTED.REF_XCLK*scaling_factor
  2. Logical Processor 0 Active, Logical Processor 1 Inactive == Elapsed TSC – “Neither Logical Processor Active” – “Fixed-Function Reference Cycles Not Halted (Logical Processor 1)”
  3. Logical Processor 1 Active, Logical Processor 0 Inactive == Elapsed TSC – “Neither Logical Processor Active” – “Fixed-Function Reference Cycles Not Halted (Logical Processor 0)”
  4. Both Logical Processors Active == CPU_CLK_UNHALTED.REF_XCLK*scaling_factor – “Fixed-Function Reference Cycles Not Halted (Logical Processor 0)” – “Fixed-Function Reference Cycles Not Halted (Logical Processor 1)”

Starting with the Skylake core, there is an additional sub-event of the programmable CPU_CLK_UNHALTED event that increments only when the current Logical Processor is active and the sibling Logical Processor is inactive.  This can certainly be used to obtain the same results, but it does not appear to save any effort.   My approach uses only one programmable counter on one of the two Logical Processors — a number that cannot be reduced by using an alternate programmable counter.   Comparison of the two approaches shows that the results are the same, so in the interest of backward compatibility, I continue to use my original approach.

Posted in Performance, Performance Counters, Reference | Comments Off on Using hardware performance counters to determine how often both logical processors are active on an Intel CPU

Notes on “non-temporal” (aka “streaming”) stores

Posted by John D. McCalpin, Ph.D. on 1st January 2018

Memory systems using caches have a lot more potential flexibility than most implementations are able to exploit – you get the standard behavior all the time, even if an alternative behavior would be allowable and desirable in a specific circumstance.  One area in which many vendors have provided an alternative to the standard behavior is in “non-temporal” or “streaming” stores. These are sometimes also referred to as “cache-bypassing” or “non-allocating” stores, and even “Non-Globally-Ordered stores” in some cases.

The availability of streaming stores on various processors can often be tied to the improvements in performance that they provide on the STREAM benchmark, but there are several approaches to implementing this functionality, with some subtleties that may not be obvious.  (The underlying mechanism of write-combining was developed long before, and for other reasons, but exposing it to the user in standard cached memory space required the motivation provided by a highly visible benchmark.)

Before getting into details, it is helpful to review the standard behavior of a “typical” cached system for store operations.  Most recent systems use a “write-allocate” policy — when a store misses the cache, the cache line containing the store’s target address is read into the cache, then the parts of the line that are receiving the new data are updated.   These “write-allocate” cache policies have several advantages (mostly related to implementation correctness), but if the code overwrites all the data in the cache line, then reading the cache line from memory could be considered an unnecessary performance overhead.    It is this extra overhead of read transactions that makes the subject of streaming stores important for the STREAM benchmark.

As in many subjects, a lot of mistakes can be avoided by looking carefully at what the various terms mean — considering both similarities and differences.

  • “Non-temporal store” means that the data being stored is not going to be read again soon (i.e., no “temporal locality”).
    • So there is no benefit to keeping the data in the processor’s cache(s), and there may be a penalty if the stored data displaces other useful data from the cache(s).
  • “Streaming store” is suggestive of stores to contiguous addresses (i.e., high “spatial locality”).
  • “Cache-bypassing store” says that at least some aspects of the transaction bypass the cache(s).
  • “Non-allocating store” says that a store that misses in a cache will not load the corresponding cache line into the cache before performing the store.
    • This implies that there is some other sort of structure to hold the data from the stores until it is sent to memory.  This may be called a “store buffer”, a “write buffer”, or a “write-combining buffer”.
  • “Non-globally-ordered store” says that the results of an NGO store might appear in a different order (relative to ordinary stores or to other NGO stores) on other processors.
    • All stores must appear in program order on the processor performing the stores, but may only need to appear in the same order on other processors in some special cases, such as stores related to interprocessor communication and synchronization.

There are at least three issues raised by these terms:

  1. Caching: Do we want the result of the store to displace something else from the cache?
  2. Allocating: Can we tolerate the extra memory traffic incurred by reading the cache line before overwriting it?
  3. Ordering: Do the results of this store need to appear in order with respect to other stores?

Different applications may have very different requirements with respect to these issues and may be best served by different implementations.   For example, if the priority is to prevent the stored data from displacing other data in the processor cache, then it may suffice to put the data in the cache, but mark it as Least-Recently-Used, so that it will displace as little useful data as possible.   In the case of the STREAM benchmark, the usual priority is the question of allocation — we want to avoid reading the data before over-writing it.

While I am not quite apologizing for that, it is clear that STREAM over-represents stores in general, and store misses in particular, relative to the high-bandwidth applications that I intended it to represent.

To understand the benefit of non-temporal stores, you need to understand if you are operating in (A) a concurrency-limited regime or (B) a bandwidth-limited regime. (This is not a short story, but you can learn a lot about how real systems work from studying it.)

(Note: The performance numbers below are from the original private version of this post created on 2015-05-29.   Newer systems require more concurrency — numbers will be updated when I have a few minutes to dig them up….)

(A) For a single thread you are almost always working in a concurrency-limited regime. For example, my Intel Xeon E5-2680 (Sandy Bridge EP) dual-socket systems have an idle memory latency to local memory of 79 ns and a peak DRAM bandwidth of 51.2 GB/s (per socket). If we assume that some cache miss handling buffer must be occupied for approximately one latency per transaction, then queuing theory dictates that you must maintain 79 ns * 51.2 GB/s = 4045 Bytes “in flight” at all times to “fill the memory pipeline” or “tolerate the latency”. This rounds up to 64 cache lines in flight, while a single core only supports 10 concurrent L1 Data Cache misses. In the absence of other mechanisms to move data, this limits a single thread to a read bandwidth of 10 lines * 64 Bytes/line / 79 ns = 8.1 GB/s.

Store misses are essentially the same as load misses in this analysis.

L1 hardware prefetchers don’t help performance here because they share the same 10 L1 cache miss buffers. L2 hardware prefetchers do help because bringing the data closer reduces the occupancy required by each cache miss transaction. Unfortunately, L2 hardware prefetchers are not directly controllable, so experimentation is required. The best read bandwidth that I have been able to achieve on this system is about 17.8 GB/s, which corresponds to an “effective concurrency” of about 22 cache lines or an “effective latency” of about 36 ns (for each of the 10 concurrent L1 misses).

L2 hardware prefetchers on this system are also able to perform prefetches for store miss streams, thus reducing the occupancy for store misses and increasing the store miss bandwidth.

For non-temporal stores there is no concept corresponding to “prefetch”, so you are stuck with whatever buffer occupancy the hardware gives you. Note that since the non-temporal store does not bring data *to* the processor, there is no reason for its occupancy to be tied to the memory latency. One would expect a cache miss buffer holding a non-temporal store to have a significantly lower latency than a cache miss, since it is allocated, filled, and then transfers its contents out to the memory controller (which presumably has many more buffers than the 10 cache miss buffers that the core supports).

But, while non-temporal stores are expected to have a shorter buffer occupancy than that of a cache miss that goes all the way to memory, it is not at all clear whether they will have a shorter buffer occupancy than a store misses that activates an L2 hardware prefetch engine. It turns out that on the Xeon E5-2680 (Sandy Bridge EP), non-temporal stores have *higher* occupancy than store misses that activate the L2 hardware prefetcher, so using non-temporal stores slows down the performance of each of the four STREAM kernels. I don’t have all the detailed numbers in front of me, but IIRC, STREAM Triad runs at about 10 GB/s with one thread on a Xeon E5-2680 when using non-temporal stores and at between 12-14 GB/s when *not* using non-temporal stores.

This result is not a general rule. On the Intel Xeon E3-1270 (also a Sandy Bridge core, but with the “client” L3 and memory controller), the occupancy of non-temporal stores in the L1 cache miss buffers appears to be much shorter, so there is not an occupancy-induced slowdown. On the older AMD processors (K8 and Family 10h), non-temporal stores used a set of four “write-combining registers” that were independent of the eight buffers used for L1 data cache misses. In this case the use of non-temporal stores allowed one thread to have more concurrent
memory transactions, so it almost always helped performance.

(B) STREAM is typically run using as many cores as is necessary to achieve the maximum sustainable memory bandwidth. In this bandwidth-limited regime non-temporal stores play a very different role. When using all the cores there are no longer concurrency limits, but there is a big difference in bulk memory traffic. Store misses must read the target lines into the L1 cache before overwriting it, while non-temporal stores avoid this (semantically unnecessary) load from memory. Thus for the STREAM Copy and Scale kernels, using cached stores results in two memory reads and one memory write, while using non-temporal stores requires only one memory read and one memory write — a 3:2 ratio. Similarly, the STREAM Add and Triad kernels transfer 4:3 as much data when using cached stores compared to non-temporal stores.

On most systems the reported performance ratios for STREAM (using all processors) with and without non-temporal stores are very close to these 3:2 and 4:3 ratios. It is also typically the case that STREAM results (again using all processors) are about the same for all four kernels when non-temporal stores are used, while (due to the differing ratios of extra read traffic) the Add and Triad kernels are typically ~1/3 faster on systems that use cached stores.

Posted in Cache Coherence Implementations, Cache Coherence Protocols, Computer Architecture, Computer Hardware, Reference | Comments Off on Notes on “non-temporal” (aka “streaming”) stores

What good are “Large Pages” ?

Posted by John D. McCalpin, Ph.D. on 12th March 2012

I am often asked what “Large Pages” in computer systems are good for. For commodity (x86_64) processors, “small pages” are 4KiB, while “large pages” are (typically) 2MiB.

  • The size of the page controls how many bits are translated between virtual and physical addresses, and so represent a trade-off between what the user is able to control (bits that are not translated) and what the operating system is able to control (bits that are translated).
  • A very knowledgeable user can use address bits that are not translated to control how data is mapped into the caches and how data is mapped to DRAM banks.

The biggest performance benefit of “Large Pages” will come when you are doing widely spaced random accesses to a large region of memory — where “large” means much bigger than the range that can be mapped by all of the small page entries in the TLBs (which typically have multiple levels in modern processors).

To make things more complex, the number of TLB entries for 4KiB pages is often larger than the number of entries for 2MiB pages, but this varies a lot by processor. There is also a lot of variation in how many “large page” entries are available in the Level 2 TLB, and it is often unclear whether the TLB stores entries for 4KiB pages and for 2MiB pages in separate locations or whether they compete for the same underlying buffers.

Examples of the differences between processors (using Todd Allen’s very helpful “cpuid” program):

AMD Opteron Family 10h Revision D (“Istanbul”):

  • L1 DTLB:
    • 4kB pages: 48 entries;
    • 2MB pages: 48 entries;
    • 1GB pages: 48 entries
  • L2 TLB:
    • 4kB pages: 512 entries;
    • 2MB pages: 128 entries;
    • 1GB pages: 16 entries

AMD Opteron Family 15h Model 6220 (“Interlagos”):

  • L1 DTLB
    • 4KiB, 32 entry, fully associative
    • 2MiB, 32 entry, fully associative
    • 1GiB, 32 entry, fully associative
  • L2 DTLB: (none)
  • Unified L2 TLB:
    • Data entries: 4KiB/2MiB/4MiB/1GiB, 1024 entries, 8-way associative
    • “An entry allocated by one core is not visible to the other core of a compute unit.”

Intel Xeon 56xx (“Westmere”):

  • L1 DTLB:
    • 4KiB pages: 64 entries;
    • 2MiB pages: 32 entries
  • L2 TLB:
    • 4kiB pages: 512 entries;
    • 2MB pages: none

Intel Xeon E5 26xx (“Sandy Bridge EP”):

  • L1 DTLB
    • 4KiB, 64 entries
    • 2MiB/4MiB, 32 entries
    • 1GiB, 4 entries
  • STLB (second-level TLB)
    • 4KiB, 512 entries
    • (There are no entries for 2MiB pages or 1GiB pages in the STLB)

Xeon Phi Coprocessor SE10P: (Note 1)

  • L1 DTLB
    • 4KiB, 64 entries, 4-way associative
    • 2MiB, 8 entries, 4-way associative
  • L2 TLB
    • 4KiB, 64 Page Directory Entries, 4-way associative (Note 2)
    • 2MiB, 64 entries, 4-way associative

Most of these cores can map at least 2MiB (512*4kB) using small pages before suffering level 2 TLB misses, and at least 64 MiB (32*2MiB) using large pages.  All of these systems should see a performance increase when performing random accesses over memory ranges that are much larger than 2MB and less than 64MB.

What you are trying to avoid in all these cases is the worst case (Note 3) scenario of traversing all four levels of the x86_64 hierarchical address translation.
If none of the address translation caching mechanisms (Note 4) work, it requires:

  • 5 trips to memory to load data mapped on a 4KiB page,
  • 4 trips to memory to load data mapped on a 2MiB page, and
  • 3 trips to memory to load data mapped on a 1GiB page.

In each case the last trip to memory is to get the requested data, while the other trips are required to obtain the various parts of the page translation information. The best description I have seen is in Section 5.3 of AMD’s “AMD64 Architecture Programmer’s Manual Volume 2: System Programming” (publication 24593).  Intel’s documentation is also good once you understand the nomenclature — for 64-bit operation the paging mode is referred to as “IA-32E Paging”, and is described in Section 4.5 of Volume 3 of the “Intel 64 and IA-32 Architectures Software Developer’s Manual” (Intel document 325384 — I use revision 059 from June 2016.)

A benchmark designed to test computer performance for random updates to a very large region of memory is the “RandomAccess” benchmark from the HPC Challenge Benchmark suite.  Although the HPC Challenge Benchmark configuration is typically used to measure performance when performing updates across the aggregate memory of a cluster, the test can certainly be run on a single node.


Note 1:

The first generation Intel Xeon Phi (a.k.a., “Knights Corner” or “KNC”) has several unusual features that combine to make large pages very important for sustained bandwidth as well as random memory latency.  The first unusual feature is that the hardware prefetchers in the KNC processor are not very aggressive, so software prefetches are required to obtain the highest levels of sustained bandwidth.  The second unusual feature is that, unlike most recent Intel processors, the KNC processor will “drop” software prefetches if the address is not mapped in the Level-1 or Level-2 TLB — i.e., a software prefetch will never trigger the Page Table Walker.   The third unusual feature is unusual enough to get a separate discussion in Note 2.

Note 2:

Unlike every other recent processor that I know of, the first generation Intel Xeon Phi does not store 4KiB Page Table Entries in the Level-2 TLB.  Instead, it stores “Page Directory Entries”, which are the next level “up” in the page translation — responsible for translating virtual address bits 29:21.  The benefit here is that storing 64 Page Table Entries would only provide the ability to access another 64*4KiB=256KiB of virtual addresses, while storing 64 Page Directory Entries eliminates one memory lookup for the Page Table Walk for an address range of 64*2MiB=128MiB.  In this case, a miss to the Level-1 DTLB for an address mapped to 4KiB pages will cause a Page Table Walk, but there is an extremely high chance that the Page Directory Entry will be in the Level-2 TLB.  Combining this with the caching for the first two levels of the hierarchical address translation (see Note 4) and a high probability of finding the Page Table Entry in the L1 or L2 caches this approach trades a small increase in latency for a large increase in the address range that can be covered with 4KiB pages.

Note 3:

The values above are not really the worst case. Running under a virtual machine makes these numbers worse. Running in an environment that causes the memory holding the various levels of the page tables to get swapped to disk makes performance much worse.

Note 4:

Unfortunately, even knowing this level of detail is not enough, because all modern processors have additional caches for the upper levels of the page translation hierarchy. As far as I can tell these are very poorly documented in public.

Posted in Computer Architecture, Computer Hardware, Performance, Reference | Comments Off on What good are “Large Pages” ?

AMD Opteron Processor models, families, and revisions

Posted by John D. McCalpin, Ph.D. on 2nd April 2011

Opteron Processor models, families, and revisions/steppings

Opteron naming is not that confusing, but AMD seems intent on making it difficult by rearranging their web site in mysterious ways….

I am creating this blog entry to make it easier for me to find my own notes on the topic!

The Wikipedia page is has a pretty good listing:
List of AMD Opteron microprocessors

AMD has useful product comparison reference pages at:
AMD Opteron Processor Solutions
AMD Desktop Processor Solutions
AMD Opteron First Generation Reference (pdf)

Borrowing from those pages, a simple summary is:

First Generation Opteron: models 1xx, 2xx, 8xx.

  • These are all Family K8, and are described in AMD pub 26094.
  • They are usually referred to as “Rev E” or “K8, Rev E” processors.
    This is usually OK since most of the 130 nm parts are gone, but there is a new Family 10h rev E (below).
  • They are characterized by having DDR DRAM interfaces, supporting DDR 266, 333, and (Revision E) 400 MHz.
  • This also includes Athlon 64 and Athlon 64 X2 in sockets 754 and 939.
  • Versions:
    • Single core, 130 nm process: K8 revisions B3, C0, CG
    • Single core, 90 nm process: K8 revisions E4, E6
    • Dual core, 90 nm process: K8 revisions E1, E6

Second Generation Opteron: models 12xx, 22xx, 82xx

  • These are upgraded Family K8 cores, with a DDR2 memory controller.
  • They are usually referred to as “Revision F”, or “K8, Rev F”, and are described in AMD pub 32559 (where they are referred to as “Family NPT 0Fh”, with NPT meaning “New Platform Technology” and referring to the infrastructure related to socket F (aka socket 1207), and socket AM2 )
  • This also includes socket AM2 models of Athlon and most Athlon X2 processors (some are Family 11h, described below).
  • There is only one server version, with two steppings:
    • Dual core, 90 nm process: K8 revisions F2, F3

Upgraded Second Generation Opteron: Athlon X2, Sempron, Turion, Turion X2

  • These are very similar to Family 0Fh, revision G (not used in server parts), and are described in AMD document 41256.
  • The memory controller has less functionality.
  • The HyperTransport interface is upgraded to support HyperTransport generation 3.
    This allows a higher frequency connection between the processor chip and the external PCIe controller, so that PCIe gen2 speeds can be supported.

Third Generation Opteron: models 13xx, 23xx, 83xx

  • These are Family 10h cores with an enhanced DDR2 memory controller and are described in AMD publication 41322.
  • All server and most desktop versions have a shared L3 cache.
  • This also includes Phenom X2, X3, and X4 (Rev B3) and Phenom II X2, X3, X4 (Rev C)
  • Versions:
    • Barcelona: Dual core & Quad core, 65 nm process: Family 10h revisions B0, B2, B3, BA
    • Shanghai: Dual core & Quad core, 45 nm process: Family 10h revision C2
    • Istanbul: Up to 6-core, 45 nm process: Family 10h, revision D0
  • Revision D (“Istanbul”) introduced the “HT Assist” probe filter feature to improve scalability in 4-socket and 8-socket systems.

Upgraded Third Generation Opteron: models 41xx & 61xx

  • These are Family 10h cores with an enhanced DDR3-capable memory controller and are also described in AMD publication 41322.
  • All server and most desktop versions have a shared L3 cache.
  • It does not appear that any of the desktop parts use this same stepping as the server parts (D1).
  • There are two versions — both manufactured using a 45nm process:
    • Lisbon: 41xx series have one Family10h revision D1 die per package (socket C32).
    • Magny-Cours: 61xx series have two Family10h revision D1 dice per package (socket G34).
  • Family 10h, Revision E0 is used in the Phenom II X6 products.
    • This revision is the first to offer the “Core Performance Boost” feature.
    • It is also the first to generate confusion about the label “Rev E”.
    • It should be referred to as “Family 10h, Revision E” to avoid ambiguity.

Fourth Generation Opteron: server processor models 42xx & 62xx, and “AMD FX” desktop processors

  • These are socket-compatible with the 41xx and 61xx series, but with the “Bulldozer” core rather than the Family 10h core.
  • The Bulldozer core adds support for:
    • AVX — the extension of SSE from 128 bits wide to 256 bits wide, plus many other improvements. (First introduced in Intel “Sandy Bridge” processors.)
    • AES — additional instructions to dramatically improve performance of AES encryption/descryption. (First introduced in Intel “Westmere” processors.)
    • FMA4 — AMD’s 4-operand multiply-accumulate instructions. (32-bit & 64-bit arithmetic, with 64b, 128b, or 256b vectors.)
    • XOP — AMD’s set of extra integer instructions that were not included in AVX: multiply/accumulate, shift/rotate/permute, etc.
  • All current parts are produced in a 32 nm semiconductor process.
  • Valencia: 42xx series have one Bulldozer revision B2 die per package (socket C32)
  • Interlagos: 62xx series have two Bulldozer revision B2 dice per package (socket G34)
  • “AMD FX”: desktop processors have one Bulldozer revision B2 die per package (socket AM3+)
  • Counting cores and chips is getting more confusing…
    • Each die has 1, 2, 3, or 4 “Bulldozer modules”.
    • Each “Bulldozer module” has two processor cores.
    • The two processor cores in a module share the instruction cache (64kB), some of the instruction fetch logic, the pair of floating-point units, and the 2MB L2 cache.
    • The two processor cores in a module each have a private data cache (16kB), private fixed point functional and address generation units, and schedulers.
    • All modules on a die share an 8 MB L3 cache and the dual-channel DDR3 memory controller.
  • Bulldozer-based systems are characterized by a much larger “turbo” boost frequency increase than previous processors, with almost models supporting an automatic frequency boost of over 20% when not using all the cores, and some models supporting frequency boosts of more than 30%.

Posted in Computer Hardware, Reference | 4 Comments »

Opteron/PhenomII STREAM Bandwidth vs CPU and DRAM Frequency

Posted by John D. McCalpin, Ph.D. on 7th October 2010

In a recent post (link) I showed that local memory latency is weakly dependent on processor and DRAM frequency in a single-socket Phenom II system. Here are some preliminary results on memory bandwidth as a function of CPU frequency and DRAM frequency in the same system.

This table does not include the lowest CPU frequency (0.8 GHz) or the lowest DRAM frequency (DDR3/800) since these results tend to be relatively poor and I prefer to look at big numbers. 🙂

Single-Thread STREAM Triad Bandwidth (MB/s)

Processor Frequency DDR3/1600 DDR3/1333 DDR3/1066
3.2 GHz 10,101 MB/s 9,813 MB/s 9,081 MB/s
2.5 GHz 10,077 MB/s 9,784 MB/s 9,053 MB/s
2.1 GHz 10,075 MB/s 9,783 MB/s 9,051 MB/s

Two-Thread STREAM Triad Bandwidth (MB/s)

Processor Frequency DDR3/1600 DDR3/1333 DDR3/1066
3.2 GHz 13,683 MB/s 12,851 MB/s 11,490 MB/s
2.5 GHz 13,337 MB/s 12,546 MB/s 11,252 MB/s
2.1 GHz 13,132 MB/s 12,367 MB/s 11,112 MB/s

So from these results it is clear that the sustainable memory bandwidth as measured by the STREAM benchmark is very weakly dependent on the CPU frequency, but moderately strongly dependent on the DRAM frequency. It is clear that a single thread is not enough to drive the memory system to maximum performance, but the modest speedup from 1 thread to 2 threads suggests that more threads will not be very helpful. More details to follow, along with some attempts to make optimize the STREAM benchmark for better sustained performance.

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Opteron Memory Latency vs CPU and DRAM Frequency

Posted by John D. McCalpin, Ph.D. on 7th October 2010

In an earlier post (link), I made the off-hand comment that local memory latency was only weakly dependent on CPU and DRAM frequency in Opteron systems. Being of the scientific mindset, I went back and gathered a clean set of data to show the extent to which this assertion is correct.

The following table presents my most reliable & accurate measurements of open page local memory latency for systems based on AMD Opteron microprocessors. These values were obtained using a pointer-chasing code (similar to lat_mem_rd from lmbench) carefully implemented to avoid memory prefetching by either the CPU cores or the Memory Controller. These results were obtained using a pointer-chasing stride of 320 Bytes, modulo 32768 Bytes. This scheme results in five passes through each 32 kB region of memory, resulting in loading every cache line but without activating the core prefetcher (which requires the stride to be no more than one cache line) or the DRAM prefetcher (which requires that the stride be no more than four cache lines on the system under test). Large pages were used to ensure that each 32kB region was mapped to contiguous DRAM locations to maximize DRAM page hits.

The system used for these tests is a home-built system:

  • AMD Phenom II 555 Processor
    • Two cores
    • Supported CPU Frequencies of 3.1, 2.5, 2.1, and 0.8 GHz
    • Silicon Revision C2 (equivalent to “Shanghai” Opteron server parts)
  • 4 GB of DDR3/1600 DRAM
    • Two 2GB unregistered, unbuffered DIMMs
    • Dual-rank DIMMs
    • Each rank is composed of eight 1 Gbit parts (128Mbit x8)

The array sizes used were 256 MB, 512 MB, and 1024 MB, with each test being run three times. Of these nine results, the value chosen for the table below was an “eye-ball” average of the 2nd-best through 5th-best results. (There was very little scatter in the results — typically less than 0.1 ns variation across the majority of the nine results for each configuration.)

Processor Frequency DDR3/1600 DDR3/1333 DDR3/1066 DDR3/800
3.2 GHz 51.58 ns 54.18 ns 57.46 ns 66.18 ns
2.5 GHz 52.77 ns 54.97 ns 58.30 ns 65.74 ns
2.1 GHz 53.94 ns 55.37 ns 58.72 ns 65.79 ns
0.8 GHz 82.86 ns 87.42 ns 94.96 ns 94.51 ns

Notes:

  1. The default frequencies for the system are 3.2 GHz for the CPU cores and 667 MHz for the DRAM (DDR3/1333)

Summary:
The results above show that the variations in (local) memory latency are relatively small for this single-socket system when the CPU frequency is varied between 2.1 and 3.2 GHz and the DRAM frequency is varied between 533 MHz (DDR3/1066) and 800 MHz (DDR3/1600). Relative to the default frequencies, the lowest latency (obtained by overclocking the DRAM by 20%) is almost 5% better. The highest latency (obtained by dropping the CPU core frequency by ~1/3 and the DRAM frequency by about 20%) is only ~8% higher than the default value.

Posted in Computer Hardware, Reference | 2 Comments »

Welcome to Dr. Bandwidth’s Blog

Posted by John D. McCalpin, Ph.D. on 1st October 2010

Welcome to the University of Texas blog of John D. McCalpin, PhD — aka Dr. Bandwidth. JohnMcCalpin

This is the beginning of a serious of posts on the exciting topic of memory bandwidth in computer systems!   I hope these posts will serve as a reference for folks interested in the increasingly complex issues regarding memory bandwidth — it seems silly for me to write all this stuff down for my own use when I suspect that there is at least one person out there who may find this information useful.

Although I currently work at the Texas Advanced Computing Center of the University of Texas at Austin, my professional career has been split about 50-50 between academia and the computer hardware industry. These blog posts will primarily deal with concrete information about real systems that (in my experience) does not fit well with the priorities of most academic publications.  Most journals or conferences require some level of “research” or “novelty”, while most of these notes are more explanatory in nature.   That is not to say that none of this will ever be published, but much of the material to be posted here is valuable for other reasons.

My interest in memory bandwidth extends back to the late 1980’s, leading to the development of the STREAM Benchmark which I have maintained since 1991.   Here is what I have to say about STREAM:


streambench_logo

What is STREAM?

The STREAM benchmark is a simple synthetic benchmark program that measures sustainable memory bandwidth (in MB/s) and the corresponding computation rate for simple vector kernels.


Why should I care?

Computer CPUs are getting faster much more quickly than computer memory systems. As this progresses, more and more programs will be limited in performance by the memory bandwidth of the system, rather than by the computational performance of the CPU.

As an extreme example, most current high-end machines run simple arithmetic kernels for out-of-cache operands at 1-2% of their rated peak speeds — that means that they are spending 98-99% of their time idle and waiting for cache misses to be satisfied.

The STREAM benchmark is specifically designed to work with datasets much larger than the available cache on any given system, so that the results are (presumably) more indicative of the performance of very large, vector style applications.


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