Permanent Seminar in Latin American Art

Doris Salcedo at the Blanton Museum of Art

October 25, 2014 · No Comments

Doris Salcedo

Hello Everyone,

This is an exciting announcement!

The Blanton Museum of the Art will showcase select works from internationally recognized artist Doris Salcedo from November 7, 2014 – February 22, 2015. Long considered a leading sculptor of her generation, Salcedo addresses themes of loss and mourning with works that cross international boundaries. Employing domestic objects such as furniture and clothing —once activated and personal—her sculptures explore the history of violence and oppression in her native Colombia and beyond, giving voice to the marginalized, missing, or deceased. Included in the Blanton’s presentation are wall installations and sculptures spanning 1992 through 2004.

This presentation marks the occasion of the artist’s first visit to The University of Texas at Austin. On November 7 at 6pm, Salcedo will give a lecture at the Blanton, discussing her work and its connection to political history.

The lecture is FREE and open to the public. Seating is limited, so please arrive early.

More info: http://blantonmuseum.org

 

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Dr. James Oles Presentations on Cézanne’s impact on Latin America and Diego Rivera’s Zapatista Landscape (Oct. 1 & 2)

September 28, 2014 · No Comments

Hello everyone,

For our second speaker of the semester, we are delighted to have Dr. James Oles, Senior Lecturer in Art and Adjunct Curator of Latin American Art at the Davis Museum at Wellesley College. Dr. Oles will lecture on the correspondences of Cézanne’s work in the oeuvre of Diego Rivera and Jesús Rafael Soto. His participation in the Permanent Seminar in Latin American Art will be particularly devoted to discuss one of Rivera’s most acclaimed and enigmatic paintings, the so-called Zapatista Landscape.


Lecture

“Cézannisme à la américaine latine: The Impact of Cézanne on Diego Rivera and Jesús Rafael Soto”

In the early 20th century, ambitious artists from Latin America had a somewhat predictable dependence on Paul Cézanne, creating works clearly inspired by Cézanne’s own idiosyncratic style. For Diego Rivera and Jesús Rafael Soto, however, the fascination with Cézanne had an impact far beyond the obvious “Cézannisme” that appears in paintings they did early in their careers. Indeed, two of the most innovative artistic movements practiced by Latin American artists in the twentieth-century—muralism and kineticism—were constructed on secure Cézannean foundations. That these two movements are so radically different should be no surprise, given that the two artists understood Cézanne in completely different ways.

EAS Auditorium (in front of the Blanton Museum)
W Oct. 1 at 3.30pm
Free and Open to the Public
Event co-sponsored by The Blanton Museum of Art


Permanent Seminar in Latin American Art

“Rivera’s Trophy”

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Diego Rivera, Zapatista Landscape, 1915

The titles of works of art can dangerously over-determine their interpretation, and nowhere is this more evident than in the case of Diego Rivera’s most famous cubist painting–indeed, one of the most famous avant-garde works ever produced by a Latin American artist. The so-called “Zapatista Landscape” of 1915 is really neither an image of a Zapata nor a landscape, but rather a machista trophy and maybe even a self-portrait—demonstrating the artist’s temporary victory in the contentious world of French cubism. This lecture, based on a research project still underway, revisits the painting with fresh and skeptical eyes.

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Diego Rivera, Woman with Goose, 1917

ART 3.434
Th. Oct. 2 at 7pm
Limited seating. Free w/ RSVP at clavis@austin.utexas.edu

 

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James Oles. Photo by Adam Wiseman

James Oles is a specialist in Latin American art, focusing on modern Mexican art and architecture, through museum as well as academic projects. His research focuses on modern Mexican art, from the 1910 Revolution through the 1960s, and his books include South of the Border: Mexico in the American Imagination, 1914-1947 (Smithsonian Institution Press, 1993) and the recently-published survey Art and Architecture in Mexico (Thames & Hudson, 2013), the first of its kind in some fifty years. Oles divides his time between the US and Mexico: he is Senior Lecturer in the Art Department at Wellesley College, and in 2002 was appointed adjunct curator of Latin American art at the Davis Museum, where he advises on exhibitions and acquisitions. In 2013 he organized an ongoing two-year curatorial project at the UNAM’s Centro Cultural Universitario Tlatelolco called “The Exposed Museum,” a series of didactic exhibitions using the UNAM collections to allow audiences to understand the content, structure, and context of all exhibitions. Current research and curatorial projects include a show on Latin American art in Mexican collections; an exploration of Mexican-Turkish cultural relations; and an exhibition on the history of color photography.

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Fall 2014 Guest Speaker: Dr. Edward Sullivan (Sept. 17 & 18)

September 4, 2014 · No Comments

Hello everyone,

We hope you are off to a good start this semester. We are thrilled to be back with our Fall 2014 CLAVIS activities! As usual, we will feature a remarkable lineup of speakers in the next several weeks, so we hope that you’ll mark your calendars right away, according to the schedule below.

We are very honored to kick off the semester with the visit of Dr. Edward Sullivan, Helen Gould Sheppard Professor of the History of Art at the Institute of Fine Arts, NYU. On W September 17th, Dr. Sullivan will be offering a lecture on modern landscape painting in the Caribbean, and on Th. 18th, he will join us at the Permanent Seminar to discuss his most recent research on Puerto Rican impressionist painter, Francisco Oller. See more details below.

Art History Lecture Series

Landscapes of Desire: The Land as Resource in the Caribbean (1770-1900)

Agostino Brunias. Free Women of Color and Their Children in a Landscape. c.1780. Brooklyn Museum

Agostino Brunias. Free Women of Color and Their Children in a Landscape. c.1780. Brooklyn Museum

This lecture will examine the infra-history of the long tradition of landscape painting in the Caribbean from the end of the 18th century to the beginning of the twentieth. Social and political events critical for the visual definition of such entities as sugar and fruit plantations are discussed through the lens of the varying histories of enslavement and the colonialist circumstances in the islands under control of Britain and Spain. Travelers from the U.S. (including Hudson River painters such as Frederic Edwin Church) and later, more avant-garde artists such as Paul Gauguin also play a crucial role in this story.

ART 1.120
W Sept. 17 at 5:30 pm
Free and Open to the Public
Event co-sponsored by the University of Texas at Austin Department of Art and Art History


Permanent Seminar in Latin American Art

From San Juan to Paris and Back: Francisco Oller and Caribbean Art in the Era of Impressionism

Francisco Oller. Hacienda Aurora. c.1898. Museo de Arte de Ponce (Puerto Rico).

Francisco Oller. Hacienda Aurora. c.1898. Museo de Arte de Ponce (Puerto Rico).

This seminar will discuss the six-year long project of researching and writing a book on the work of Puerto Rican Realist-Impressionist painter Francisco Oller, his worlds in both the Caribbean and Paris, his European and North American contemporaries and his contribution to contemporary art of his era. The book will appear in October of this year published by Yale University Press. It is also the subject of an exhibition curated by Edward Sullivan and Richard Aste (curator of European Art, The Brooklyn Museum_) opening in June 2015 at The Blanton Museum of Art.
CLAVIS 3.434
Th. Sept. 18 at 7pm
This session is full

 

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Edward J. Sullivan is the Helen Gould Sheppard Professor of the History of Art at the Institute of Fine Arts and the Department of Art History at New York University. His major fields of specialization are the arts of the Americas from the 19th century to the present. He is the author of some thirty books and exhibition catalogues. Among his more recent publications are the following:
-Brazil: Body and Soul (Guggenheim Museum, 2001)
-Fragile Demon: Juan Soriano in Mexico (Philadelphia Museum of Art 2007)
-The Language of Objects in the Art of the Americas (Yale University Press, 2007)
-Continental Shifts: the Art of Edouard Duval-Carrié (Haitian Art alliance, Miami, 2008)
-From San Juan to Paris and Back: Francisco Oller & Caribbean Art in the Era of Impressionism (Yale University Press, 2014)

He has been curator of many exhibitions in Latin America, Europe and the U.S. His upcoming exhibition on Oller and Caribbean Art of the 19th century opens here at the Blanton Museum on June 14, 2015.

His current project is a book on the “Hemispheric Nineteenth Century” for Laurance King Publishers, London.

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Permanent Seminar, April 24: Luis Barragán’s Rooms with Kathryn O’Rourke

April 21, 2014 · No Comments

Please join us for the last Permanent Seminar of Spring 2014 with with Dr. Kathryn O’Rourke from Trinity University (San Antonio).

Luis Barragán’s Rooms

Kathryn O’Rourke

Thursday, April 24, 2014
7:00 pm
CLAVIS, ART 3.434

Barragan_PS-4.24-web

Luis Barragán is perhaps Mexico’s best-known architect internationally. His mature work has long been noted for its integration of aspects of colonial Mexican architecture, popular art, and principles of international modernism.  We will explore these ideas in relation to issues of representation in Barragán’s work, his approach to the design of rooms, and long-standing problems in Mexican architecture.

We hope to see you all at CLAVIS at 7pm or online via our Ustream channel: http://www.ustream.tv/channel/live-streaming-of-the-permanent-seminar-in-latin-american-art.

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Lecture by Kathryn O’Rourke: Making Space for Mexican Architecture

April 19, 2014 · No Comments

Art History Lecture Series

Making Space for Mexican Architecture
Kathryn O’Rourke
Trinity University, San Antonio

Wednesday, April 23, 2014
5-6:30 pm
Art Building, Room 1.120

Alberto Arai, Racquetball courts of the University City, 1952. Photograph by Armando Salas Portugal.

Alberto Arai, Racquetball courts of the University City, 1952. Photograph by Armando Salas Portugal.

In several texts written around midcentury, Mexican architect Alberto Arai proposed a theory of national architecture based on new ways of perceiving and responding to the spaces and buildings of pre-conquest Mexico. Attempting to reconcile the formal and ideological differences between historicism and Mexican “functionalism,” Arai argued for an intensely psychological approach to ancient buildings in writings that echoed an unusual variety theoretical writings on art, architecture, and Mexican culture. This talk considers the relationship of Arai’s work to ways that space was understood, reshaped, and represented at a critical turning point in Mexican art and architecture.

Kathryn O’Rourke received her B.A. in Architecture from Wellesley College and her M.A. and Ph.D. in the History of Art from the University of Pennsylvania. Dr. O’Rourke’s research focuses on twentieth-century architecture in Mexico and her publications include essays on Mexican architectural rationalism and public health care reform, Ludwig Mies van der Rohe’s work in Latin America, and urban planning in 1920s Mexico City. She is currently completing a book project, Building History: Modern Architecture in Mexico City, about the influence of Mexican architectural history on modern architecture in the Mexican capital.

This lectures is co-sponsored by ISLAA-Institute for Studies on Latin American Art.

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Permanent Seminar–Spring 2014

March 6, 2014 · No Comments

We are excited to be back with the Spring 2014 Permanent Seminar! Under the common title Modernity in Transition. Architectural Processes in Latin America, we launch three sessions focused on modern architectural projects in Colombia, Cuba, and Mexico in the 1950s and 1960s. Our guest presenters are Victoria Sánchez Holguín (Doctoral Student at UT Austin), Fredo Rivera (PhD Candidate at Duke University), and Dr. Kathryn O’Rourke (Art History Professor at Trinity University).

As usual, our meetings will take place in CLAVIS (ART 3.434).

If you cannot join us in person, live streaming will be available on our Ustream channel.

We look forward to exciting conversations!

* * * * * * *

Victoria Sánchez Holguín

Ciudad Kennedy: Modernization and Social Reality in Colombia in the 1960s

March 19th / 7:00 pm

JFK-Alberto-Colombia-web

The efforts by the Colombian state to the country’s housing shortage had its greatest impact in the 1960s and 1970s, when the Instituto de Crédito Territorial (ICT – Institute of the Territorial Credit) built approximately half a million units throughout the country. This presentation seeks to illuminate the role played by the ICT in the process of modernization of Colombian cities by focusing on the nearly 10,000 social housing units known as Ciudad Kennedy, a neighborhood in Bogotá. In Ciudad Kennedy, urbanistic, architectural, and technological experiments converge with the issues of the U.S. political and financial interests  in Latin America, promoted through the aid provided by the Alliance for Progress.

Victoria Sánchez Holguín holds a bachelor’s and a master’s degree in architecture and urbanism for the Universität Stuttgart, Germany. From 1999 to 2013, she was a lecturer in urban and architectural history at the School of Architecture of the Universidad Pontificia Bolivariana in Medellín, Colombia. Currently she is a PhD student in the School of Architecture at the University of Texas at Austin.

Fredo Rivera

Building Utopia: Architecture and Ideology in 1960s Havana, Cuba

April 9th / 7:00 pm

Fredo's talk

In her survey of Cuban contemporary art Rachel Weiss marks utopia as a dominant theme in Cuban art and culture. The contemporary fascination with and critique of utopia is indicative of the predominance of 1960s and 70s socialist projects in shaping the island nation’s consciousness and built environment. My presentation will explore theories and discourse regarding utopia and Marxism of the long 1960s, explicating the manner in which utopia is expressed both in architecture and architectural discourse.  Looking at examples such as the Escuelas Nacional de Arte (1961-5), the Edificio Experimental (1967), and the Ciudad Universitaria José Antonio Echeverria (CUJAE), I will focus on debates regarding utopia both within Cuba and globally. After discussing writings by Ernst Bloch, Ricardo Porro, Manfredo Tafuri, Che Guevara, Carlos Villanueva, and others, I will open the floor to discussion about the role of utopia in modern Latin America and globally.

Fredo Rivera is a Ph.D. Candidate at Duke University, where he is currently finishing his dissertation “Revolutionizing Modernities: Visualizing Utopia in 1960s Havana, Cuba.”  He specializes in Caribbean art and visual culture, modern Latin America, and architecture and urbanism in the Global South.  He was previously a Research Affiliate at the School of Architecture of the University of Miami and an Andrew W. Mellon Predoctoral Fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts (CASVA). He also conducts research on contemporary Miami and Haitian art and visual culture.

Kathryn O’Rourke

Luis Barragán’s Rooms

April 24th / 7:00 pm

Gilardi-web

Luis Barragán is perhaps Mexico’s best-known architect internationally. His mature work has long been noted for its integration of aspects of colonial Mexican architecture, popular art, and principles of international modernism. We will explore these ideas in relation to issues of representation in Barragán’s work, his approach to the design of rooms, and long-standing problems in Mexican architecture.

Kathryn O’Rourke received her B.A. in Architecture from Wellesley College and her M.A. and Ph.D. in the History of Art from the University of Pennsylvania. Her research focuses on twentieth-century architecture in Mexico and her publications include essays on Mexican architectural rationalism and public health care reform, Ludwig Mies van der Rohe’s work in Latin America, and urban planning in the 1920s Mexico City. She is currently completing a book project, Building History: Modern Architecture in Mexico City, about the influence of Mexican architectural history on modern architecture in the Mexican capital.

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Two exhibitions featuring artist Juan Capistran open next week.

January 22, 2014 · No Comments

Following a quiet but busy fall, we are delighted to start 2014 with two very exciting exhibitions curated by our colleague Rose Salseda. Rose has been investigating the work of Mexico-born, Los-Angeles-based artist Juan Capistran for a few years now. Last year she discussed his work at the CAA Conference in NYC.

It’s a real treat that Rose is bringing Capistran’s work for two separate exhibitions that open at UT next week. Please, mark your calendars:

1. Thursday, January 30th at 5pm in the ISESE Gallery at the Warfield Center (JES A230): Historical Present, an exhibition of photographs and mixed media works by Juan Capistran and Ricky Yanas and curated by Rose Salseda. More information here: http://www.utexas.edu/cola/centers/caaas/news/7350

2. Friday, January 31st at 6pm in the VAC: What We Want, What We Believe: Towards a Higher Fidelity, a solo exhibition of new art by Juan Capistran curated by Rose Salseda; Art History: Selections from the Green-Christian Collection, curated by Professor Eddie Chambers; and Grids and Geography: Dean Fleming’s Travels in North African and Greece, 1964, curated by Professor Linda Henderson. More information here: http://utvac.org/exhibitions/upcoming

 

Historical Present

 

Juan Capistran (b. 1976, Guadalajara, Jalisco, Mexico) is a Los Angeles-based artist whose mixed media works were prominently featured in Phantom Sightings: Art After the Chicano Movement, the pioneering exhibition of Mexican American contemporary art that debuted at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art in 2007. A graduate of Otis College of Art and Design in Los Angeles and the University of California, Irvine, Capistran has exhibited his art internationally at the 12th Istanbul Biennial in Turkey, the New Museum in New York, the Museum of Contemporary Art in Denver, and the 2nd Triennial Poli-Grafica in San Juan, Puerto Rico among many others.

Ricky Yanas (b. 1984, San Antonio, Texas) is an Austin-based artist and photography lecturer at the Texas State University, San Marcos. Since graduating from the MFA program in photography at UT Austin in 2011, Yanas’s work has been featured in exhibitions at Mexic-Arte Museum and Up Collective in Austin. In 2012, he was a co-recipient of the prestigious Idea Fund Grant and a guest editor and featured artist in Pastelegram, an Austin-based print and online art magazine.

Curator Rose G. Salseda is a PhD candidate in Art History at The University of Texas at Austin. She researches modern and contemporary art, with an emphasis on the parallel and intersecting histories of Latino and African-American artists. Her dissertation, The Visual Art Legacy of the 1992 Los Angeles Riots, includes an in-depth look at artworks by Adrian Piper, Chris Burden, Nick Cave, and Juan Capistran that were inspired by one of the largest uprisings in US history.

 

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Permanent Seminar–Fall 2013

October 28, 2013 · No Comments

Hello everyone,
The Center for Latin American Visual Studies (CLAVIS) of the Department of Art and Art History is thrilled to invite you to the Permanent Seminar. As many of you know, the Permanent Seminar is an open-ended research space dedicated to the creative production of knowledge on Latin American art. Since the beginning of 2008, graduate students, artists, scholars, and curators from UT as well as from Latin America come together regularly for this initiative.
We are excited to be back and to launch the Fall 2014 Permanent Seminar with two sessions that will certainly contribute to dynamic discussions. This semester we will focus on contemporary art practices in Peru and Argentina. Dorota Biczel and Cynthia Francica, PhD Candidates in Art History and Comparative Literature, respectively, will discuss collaborative experimental art projects, political affairs, and underground spaces taking place in Lima and Buenos Aires during the last decades. Through these meetings, we aim to explore art in times of political turmoil.
As usual, our meetings will take place in CLAVIS (ART 3.434).

Thursday, October 31, 7 pm

“Nothing political”: Limeña cultural underground and remaking of the politics in the 1980s

Dorota Biczel

Lima_band

Between 1984 and 1987, the architectural collective Los Bestias, comprised of students of the Universidad Ricardo Palma in Lima, Peru, realized a number of informal interventions on university campuses and other sites of the Peruvian capital. They also created scenography and graphic materials for Limeña underground rock events, such as the concerts Denuncia x la vida and Rockacho. This emergent heterogeneous cultural scene ostensibly identified itself with the slogan “nothing political.” Nonetheless, their posters, zines, and song lyrics took on the most pressing problems of the moment, including extreme political and social violence. I argue that in the context of the Peruvian Internal Conflict (1980–2000) and the ensuing decline of the Peruvian left, their stance served as a dramatic rearticulation of the term “political.” Their events crystallized a new type of counterpublic, which stood in opposition to a cohesive, homogeneous social body that the dominant ideologies—various streaks of Marxism, including “Leninist-Maoist” revolution, and neoliberal modernization—required and intended to forge. Thus, they dramatically remade the platform from which political demands would be voiced.

Dorota Biczel is doctoral candidate at the Center for Latin American Visual Studies (CLAVIS) in the Department of Art and Art History at The University of Texas at Austin. Her research interests revolve around the questions of community building, ‘public sphere’, and art historiographies in the ‘new democracies’ under neoliberal policies in Latin America and Eastern Europe. Her dissertation focuses on artistic and architectural experimental practice and the notions of the public in Lima, Peru, between 1978 and 1989.

Thursday, November 21, 7 pm

“Belleza y Felicidad:” Queerness and Visual Practices

Cynthia Francica

ByF-1

“Belleza y Felicidad” (1999-2007) was an underground, anti-institutional art gallery/publishing house that provided young writers and artists with the opportunity to informally circulate their work outside traditional and hard to access cultural circuits. Founded in Almagro, Buenos Aires, by visual artists and writers Fernanda Laguna and Cecilia Pavón, the space became a stage for interdisciplinary explorations as well as for alternative modes of subjectivity and sociability. I examine artwork connected with “ByF” in order to track the emergence of alternative ways of doing, feeling, and engaging with the visual in this space.

Cynthia Francica is a Ph.D. Candidate in Comparative Literature at The University of Texas at Austin. She is currently writing her dissertation titled “Visual Reading, Queer Writing: Literature and the Visual Arts in the U.S. and Argentina” under the auspices of a Comparative Literature Graduate Excellence Continuing Fellowship. She holds an M.A. in Comparative Literature from UT Austin.

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Time to submit paper proposals for 2014 CAA Conference in Chicago.

April 23, 2013 · No Comments

The deadline for paper submissions for 2014 College Art Association Conference in Chicago, IL, is coming up soon.
Among many panels of interest, we suggest:

Visualizing the Riot

Dr. Eddie Chambers, Assistant Professor, and Rose Salseda, Doctoral Student, University of Texas at Austin;

Please submit proposals to eddiechambers@austin.utexas.edu and rsalseda@gmail.com

Throughout the twentieth century, riots have been an intermittent yet pronounced aspect of urban history. Primarily due to the violence they embody, riots draw particular types of attention from mainstream media and arguably pass into history, as well as the popular imagination, in various skewed and problematic ways. In contrast, many artists have made fascinating, sophisticated works that reference specific episodes of rioting. Surprisingly, given the power of the artworks and the devastating effects of rioting, scant curatorial and scholarly attention is paid to how artists visualize riots. Therefore, this session seeks to address some of these seldom-considered issues. The co-chairs seek proposals from art historians, curators, and artists who have explored the visualization of riots. In addition, they hope to secure contributions that critically examine the dominant tropes of rioting, such as burning buildings, looting, and so on, that have become a familiar aspect of mainstream reportage.

See the official 2014 CFP at http://www.collegeart.org/pdf/2014CallforParticipation.pdf (CFP listed on page six).

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Art History/CLAVIS Lecture Series: Rachel Weiss on April 18, 4:00pm

April 10, 2013 · No Comments

April might be the cruelest month, but it is also one of the most exciting ones. On April 17 and 18, CLAVIS will be hosting Rachel Weiss, Professor of Arts Administration and Policy at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. We are looking forward to listening to and conversing with this noted scholar of New Cuban Art, an incisive critic of art institutions, and one of the curators co-responsible for a now ubiquitous term “global Conceptualism.” On Wednesday, April 17, Rachel Weiss will lead a Permanent Seminar at CLAVIS. On Thursday, April 18, she will deliver a lecture in the Art History Lecture Series.
We look forward to seeing you at these two thrilling events!

Art History Lecture Series and CLAVIS present:

Rachel Weiss

Lupe at the mic”

Thursday, April 18, 4:00 pm

Art Building, Room 1.120

Lupe-at-the-mic

“Lupe at the mic” recounts the 2009 performance in Havana for which Tania Bruguera installed a microphone in the patio of the Wifredo Lam Center and invited people to speak, unfiltered, for a minute each. Among those who took her up on her offer was famed dissident blogger Yoani Sánchez, which meant that the piece was an instant scandal and, additionally, succès de scandale. Despite that inherent element of melodrama, there was an unsettling vacuum of catharsis produced by the event, and in fact, it was in its afterlife as rumor, YouTube video, and blog post that the work achieved greatest density. This talk will think through some of the resonances, contradictions, and quandaries raised by the piece and by its reception in various quarters. It is part of a larger project Weiss is currently working on about upsetting experiences of art.

Writer, educator and lapsed curator, Rachel Weiss is Professor of Arts Administration and Policy at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. She has published extensively on contemporary art in journals, magazines and newspapers in the US, Europe, Latin America, Asia and Australia. Major publications include Making Art Global: The Tercera Bienal de la Habana (Afterall Books), To and From Utopia in the New Cuban Art (University of Minnesota Press), Por América: la obra de Juan Francisco Elso (Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Instituto de Investigaciones Estéticas: co-author and editor) and On Art, Artists, Latin America and Other Utopias by Luis Camnitzer (University of Texas Press: editor). Among her major curatorial projects is included the pioneer exhibition Global Conceptualism 1950s-1980s: Points of Origin (Queens Museum of Art, NYC: co-director with Luis Camnitzer and Jane Farver)

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