Celebrated Cookbook Author Serves Up Stories of Mexico’s Culinary Heritage

oaxaDiana Kennedy, known by many as the “Julia Child of Mexican Cuisine,” will discuss the history of Mexican cooking on Thursday, April, 29, 6 p.m., at the Blanton Museum of Art, as part of the Mexican Center’s “Foodways of Mexico” speaker series.

From recipes shared between mothers and daughters to village feasts in which the entire community prepares the meal, Mexico has a rich food tradition. With her profound knowledge of the culture, Kennedy will discuss the dishes and recipes of Mexico that are handed down from generation to generation.

With a zest for adventure and a passion for Mexican culture, foodKennedy spent more than 30 years traveling to the farthest reaches of her adopted homeland to track down authentic recipes.

Stories from her travels along with a wide assortment of recipes are documented in her classic cookbooks, which include “The Cuisines of Mexico” and “The Art of Mexican Cooking.” She received the highest honor given to foreigners by the Mexican government, the Order of the Aztec Eagle, as well as numerous awards from gastronomic institutions throughout the world. Her latest book, “Oaxaca al Gusto: An Infinite Gastronomy” will be published in September 2010 by the University of Texas Press.

Sustainable Architecture In Vorarlberg

Book Cover_EnglishEarth Day is celebrating its 40th anniversary on April 22, 2010. This once-a-year event galvanizes millions of individuals across the world to help make the planet a cleaner, more sustainable, place to live.

Architects play a crucial role in this effort, helping to solve such issues as urban sprawl and density, environmental impact of building projects, energy performance of buildings, affordable housing, social equity and sustainable technology.

In his book, Sustainable Architecture in Vorarlberg, Ulrich Dangel, assistant professor of architecture at The University of Texas at Austin, discusses the regional building style in Vorarlberg, an Austrian city known for its sustainable construction methods that have culminated into a model for architecture worldwide.

Dangel will have a book signing from 6 to 8 p.m., Thursday, May 6 at Domy Books located at 913 East Ceasar Chavez, Austin, Texas.

Writer Angella Nazarian reads from “Life as a Visitor” at the Ransom Center

Cover of Angella Nazarian's 'Life As a Visitor'

Writer Angella M. Nazarian reads from “Life as a Visitor,” her account of fleeing Iran with her family and life as an immigrant caught between two cultures at 7 p.m., Tuesday, April 20, at the Harry Ransom Center. A book signing follows. This program will be webcast live.

Forced to flee to the United States at age 11 after the violent Iranian Revolution of 1979, Nazarian talks about her journey from past to present, from the exotic to the familiar and from a country’s political struggle to her own inner struggle in search of home, family and a sense of belonging.

Nazarian is a professor of psychology and facilitates adult personal development workshops. She is an avid traveler, photographer and art enthusiast and has integrated these passions into her writing and her contributions to the Huffington Post and other publications.

This program is co-sponsored by the Schusterman Center for Jewish Studies at The University of Texas at Austin.

Writer Angella Nazarian reads from "Life as a Visitor" at the Ransom Center

Cover of Angella Nazarian's 'Life As a Visitor'

Writer Angella M. Nazarian reads from “Life as a Visitor,” her account of fleeing Iran with her family and life as an immigrant caught between two cultures at 7 p.m., Tuesday, April 20, at the Harry Ransom Center. A book signing follows. This program will be webcast live.

Forced to flee to the United States at age 11 after the violent Iranian Revolution of 1979, Nazarian talks about her journey from past to present, from the exotic to the familiar and from a country’s political struggle to her own inner struggle in search of home, family and a sense of belonging.

Nazarian is a professor of psychology and facilitates adult personal development workshops. She is an avid traveler, photographer and art enthusiast and has integrated these passions into her writing and her contributions to the Huffington Post and other publications.

This program is co-sponsored by the Schusterman Center for Jewish Studies at The University of Texas at Austin.

“You Majored in What?” Now in Paperback

k_brooksThis May flocks of recent college grads will be polishing their resumes, prepping for interviews and priming their answers for The Question: “What are you going to do with that liberal arts major?”

According to Kate Brooks, liberal arts career services director, the answer is: Just about anything you want to do!

In “You Majored in What: Mapping Your Path from Chaos to Career” (Viking, 2009), Brooks helps students on the cusp of graduation make sense out of their overwhelming job search.

Contrary to the traditional myth that liberal arts majors are limited to few career options, Brooks explains how degrees in such fields as English, economics and history can be very marketable to future employers in various sectors. Through practical techniques including visual mapping, storytelling and experimenting, she shows readers how to plot out their career goals and translate their broad field of study in interviews and resumes.

Brooks uses the chaos theory to show students how to make new connections from the seeming chaos of their lives. One popular aspect of this theory is the butterfly effect: the notion that a small action now can have a dramatic effect in the future.

book

In a recent Washington Post story, Ivellisse Morales, a public relations major at Boston University, said …“I’ve managed to reasonably plan out my life, but for the undecided college student, ‘the butterfly effect’ is a savior. With colloquial yet comforting language, Katherine explains the need to know one’s self —skills, interests and talents— to find a job after graduation, no matter what major or circumstances…”

“You Majored in What?” is now available in paperback with an added appendix on job hunting in a recession.

For more career advise, visit Brooks’ Psychology Today blog Career Transitions.

Have you been asked The Question? What was your response? Post a comment and tell us about it.

"You Majored in What?" Now in Paperback

k_brooksThis May flocks of recent college grads will be polishing their resumes, prepping for interviews and priming their answers for The Question: “What are you going to do with that liberal arts major?”

According to Kate Brooks, liberal arts career services director, the answer is: Just about anything you want to do!

In “You Majored in What: Mapping Your Path from Chaos to Career” (Viking, 2009), Brooks helps students on the cusp of graduation make sense out of their overwhelming job search.

Contrary to the traditional myth that liberal arts majors are limited to few career options, Brooks explains how degrees in such fields as English, economics and history can be very marketable to future employers in various sectors. Through practical techniques including visual mapping, storytelling and experimenting, she shows readers how to plot out their career goals and translate their broad field of study in interviews and resumes.

Brooks uses the chaos theory to show students how to make new connections from the seeming chaos of their lives. One popular aspect of this theory is the butterfly effect: the notion that a small action now can have a dramatic effect in the future.

book

In a recent Washington Post story, Ivellisse Morales, a public relations major at Boston University, said …“I’ve managed to reasonably plan out my life, but for the undecided college student, ‘the butterfly effect’ is a savior. With colloquial yet comforting language, Katherine explains the need to know one’s self —skills, interests and talents— to find a job after graduation, no matter what major or circumstances…”

“You Majored in What?” is now available in paperback with an added appendix on job hunting in a recession.

For more career advise, visit Brooks’ Psychology Today blog Career Transitions.

Have you been asked The Question? What was your response? Post a comment and tell us about it.

British Writer Iain Sinclair Discusses his Walking Habit at the Ransom Center

Photo of Iain Sinclair by Joy Gordon

Photo of Iain Sinclair by Joy Gordon

British writer Iain Sinclair, whose archive resides at the Ransom Center, reads from “London Orbital” and other works at 7 p.m., Thursday, April 8, at the Harry Ransom Center. The reading will be followed by a conversation between Sinclair and author Michael Moorcock, audience questions, and a book signing. This program will be webcast live.

“London Orbital” is Sinclair’s “compulsively detouring account of walking and writing across one small patch of ground over forty years.”

Walking around the “acoustic footprints” of the M25 orbital motorway, the ring road that encloses London, was Sinclair’s method of discovering where the sprawling city gave up the ghost: and where the uncertain future was carrying us. Trends are auditioned in these suburban edgelands: off-highway business parks, golf courses, decommissioned Victorian lunatic asylums. Walking became a form of writing, a method for connecting with lost histories. Sinclair discusses this and other expeditions, with appropriate readings from a number of books.

Sinclair is the author of “Downriver” (winner of the James Tait Black Memorial Prize and the Encore Award); “Landor’s Tower;” “White Chappell, Scarlet Tracings;” “Lights Out for the Territory;” “Lud Heat;” “Rodinsky’s Room” (with Rachel Lichtenstein); “Radon Daughters;” “London Orbital” and “Dining on Stones.” He is also the editor of “London: City of Disappearances.” He lives in Hackney, East London.

Historian Awarded Cartwright Prize for Book on Polio

David_Oshinsky-smallDavid Oshinsky, Distinguished Teaching Professor of History, has been awarded the Cartwright Prize from Columbia University Medical Center for his book “Polio: An American Story” (Oxford University Press, 2005).

He will also present the annual Cartwright Lecture next month.

The lecture series provides a forum for leading scientists and scholars to review important medical research. Previous speakers and prize recipients have included nine Nobel laureates, top officials from the National Academy of Sciences and the National Institutes of Health and a United States Senator.

Oshinsky’s lecture, titled “Polio: A Look Back at America’s Most Successful Public Health Crusade,” will draw from his Pulitzer Prize-winning book.

“I’m honored – but, more so, humbled – to be in the company of previous Cartwright winners,” says Oshinsky. “I feel privileged to share the lessons our nation learned from the successful fight against polio.”

Oshinsky will give the lecture on Wednesday, April 21 in New York.