Coming April 2: LLILAS Presents an Evening of Latin@ Poetry and Spoken Word

llilaseventStop by the Benson Latin American Collection for an evening of poetry readings and spoken-word performances on Thursday, April 2, from 7 to 9 p.m.

The 13th annual ¡A Viva Voz! Migraciones event, hosted by LLILAS Benson Latin American Studies and Collections, will feature live readings and performances of original work by Central Texas–based poets and spoken word artists.

The following artists will share diverse perspectives around themes of migration and identify:

  • Ariana Brown, Afro-Mexicana poet, performer, and author
  • Marcos Cervantes (aka Mex Step of Third Root hip hop collective), educator and scholar
  • Las Krudas, Cuban hip hop artists
  • Teresa Palomo Acosta, poet, educator and historian
  • Moderator: Celeste Guzmán Mendoza, poet

This event is free and open to the public. Light refreshments provided. RSVP and find updates on Facebook at http://bit.ly/avv2015.

Texas Literature Authors Philipp Meyer and Don Graham to Speak at the Bob Bullock Museum

the-son-secondaryThe UT Michener Center for Writers and the Bullock Texas State History Museum will jointly sponsor a conversation between Michener Center alum Philipp Meyer, author of The Son, and Don Graham, J. Frank Dobie Professor of American and English Literature at UT Austin and legendary scholar of Texas literary history.

Their free talk, at 7:00 p.m.Thursday, February 19 at the Bullock, will explore how Meyer’s five years of research led to the prize-winning novel, how Texas mythology and history shaped the story, and how a transplant from Baltimore came to write one of the Great Texas, and Great American, novels.

Meyer received critical acclaim for his 2009 debut novel, American Rust, and The Son, published in 2013, was a finalist for the 2014 Pulitzer Prize and named in the Top Ten lists of the Washington Post, Amazon, Toronto Globe and Mail, USA Today and Chicago Tribune, among many other honors.

The New York Times said of the book, “only in the greatest historical novels do we come to feel both the distance of the past and our own likely complicity in the sins of a former age.  To that rank, we now add ‘The Son.'”  Meyer was first introduced to Texas novelists such as Cormac McCarthy and Larry McMurtry—as well as to pivotal events in Texas history that inform his story—in a graduate seminar with Graham while earning his MFA at the Michener Center for Writers.

The program is part of the Bullock Museum’s Texas Art and Culture Series, which is generously supported by Lone Star Beer, the national beer of Texas.  The event is free of charge and open to the public.  The Bullock is located at 1800 Congress Avenue  at W. MLK Blvd.

Save the Date: A Reading by Poet Matthea Harvey

ddddThe UT Michener Center for Writers will host a reading by poet Matthea Harvey on Thursday, February 12, at 7:30 p.m. in the Avaya Auditorium, POB 2.302, on UT campus at the southeast corner of Speedway and 24th Streets.

Matthea Harvey is the author of five books of poetry, including If the Tabloids Are True What Are You? (2014); Modern Life (2007), winner of the Kingsley Tufts Poetry Award, finalist for the National Book Critics’ Circle Award, and New York Times Notable Book; Sad Little Breathing Machine (2004); and Pity the Bathtub Its Forced Embrace of the Human Form (2000). She has also written two children’s books, Cecil the Pet Glacier and The Little General and the Giant Snowflake.  She teaches poetry at Sarah Lawrence and lives in Brooklyn.

Poet Jorie Graham has described Harvey’s syntactically shape-shifting poems as “generous, urgent and savingly committed to beauty.”  New York Times reviewer David Orr has said her work “ranges from daffy to plangent—basically, two scoops of John Ashbery and a sprinkling of Gertrude Stein.”

Parking is available in the nearby UT San Jacinto Garage, and the event is free and open to the public.

 

Michener Center Presents Reading by America’s “Pugilistic Poet” August Kleinzahler

member_image_13229290248615022461Acclaimed poet August Kleinzahler will present a reading at a campus event hosted by the Michener Center for Writers on Nov. 6, 7:30 p.m. in the Avaya Auditorium, POB 2.302.

 

Kleinzahler’s impressive body of work is a hybrid of high and low influences, mixing street-smart language and articulate cultural references with his unique brand of hard-boiled whimsy. His outsider stance has also gained him a reputation as a literary bad-boy, the “pugilistic poet,” duking it out with both pop culturists—somewhat famously, Garrison Keillor, over his folksy “Good Poems” anthology—and academics alike. Kleinzahler’s literary fame has built steadily over four decades.

 

He published a handful of poetry books with independent presses before New York publisher Farrar Straus & Giroux picked up his 1995 “Red Sauce, Whiskey and Snow.” They have published his last six books, as well as revived earlier work in new editions.  

 

Kleinzahler won the distinguished Griffin International Poetry Prize in 2004 for “The Strange Hours Travelers Keep,” and his new and selected poems, “Sleeping it Off in Rapid City” (2008), was awarded the National Book Critics Circle Award. His prose also regularly appears in the London Review of Books and Slate, among others, and he has published a volume of meditative essays, “Cutty One Rock:  Low Characters and Strange Places, Gently Explained.” His newest book of poems is “The Hotel Oneira,” which the Guardian describes as “dreamlike yet savvy, among the most delightful flowerings of American poetry in our times.”

 

The event is free and open to the public. Parking is available in the nearby UT San Jacinto Garage.

Lucie Brock-Broido to Speak on Campus Oct. 16

The UT Michener Center for Writers will host a reading by acclaimed poet Lucie Brock-Broido on Thursday, October 16, 2014 at 7:30 pm in the Avaya Auditorium, POB 2.302, on UT campus.The event is free and open to the public.

Book Cover: Stay, IllusionBrock-Broido’s newest collection, Stay, Illusion, was a finalist in Poetry for the 2013 National Book Award.  Her previous collections include Trouble in Mind, The Master Letters, and A Hunger. Her poetry has appeared in many magazines and literary journals including The Paris Review, Parnassus:  Poetry in Review, The American Poetry Review, Poetry, The Nation, The New Republic, Best American Poetry, and The New Yorker. Director of Poetry in the School of Arts of Columbia University in NYC, she is also the recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship, NEA support, and the Witter-Bynner Prize from the American Academy of Arts and Letters.

The Secret Life of Magnum Photographs: American Studies Professor Offers an Inside Look at Some of the World’s Most Iconic Images

High above a blur of cars on a congested street in Lower Manhattan, a Chinese man sits atop a tiny fire escape sipping a bowl of noodles.

Surrounded by a concrete jungle of asphalt and high-rise buildings, the man is far from isolation. Yet somehow he appears to be very much alone and out of place.

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This powerful portrayal of modern immigrant life —the cramped living space, the alienation, the absence of color and wide-open spaces – exquisitely captures the parallels between inward struggles and the outside world.

This 1996 photograph from Chien-Chi Chang’s China Town project is one of many iconic photographs in the massive Magnum Photos archive that evoke a sense of wonder and mystery about the world around us. While many of these prints are now valuable art commodities, they were originally intended for reproduction in publications around the world, says Steven Hoelscher, professor of American studies and geography at UT Austin. Continue reading

Poets Nye, Fountain and McGriff on Campus Dec. 5

visiting writersThe UT Michener Center for Writers will host an evening with our visiting poets and alums NAOMI SHIHAB NYECARRIE FOUNTAIN, and MICHAEL MCGRIFF on Thursday, December 5, 2013 at 7:30 pm in the Avaya Auditorium, POB 2.302.  San Antonio native Nye is a force of nature in American poetry who has taught for the Michener Center numerous times over the years.  Fountain and McGriff are distinguished alums who are teaching for UT’s Department of English New Writers Project and the MCW, respectively, this fall.

The Peter O’Donnell building, formerly known as the ACES building, is on the southeast corner of 24th and Speedway on UT Campus.  Parking is available in the nearby UT garage at San Jacinto and 24th.

 

Dec. 7: Humanities Texas Holiday Book Fair

Love reading? Need a great present for those bibliophiles on your holiday list? Want to meet some talented Texas authors? Come by the Byrne-Reed House (1410 Rio Grande Street) for Humanities Texas’s fifth annual Holiday Book Fair, which will take place on Saturday, December 7, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.

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Noteworthy authors participating in this year’s festive event include Bill Minutaglio, Steven Harrigan, Nick Kotz, Joe Nick Patoski, Chase Untermeyer, Jesús F. de la Teja, Jerome Loving, Ricardo C. Ainslie, Sarah Cortez, Nan Cuba, Diana Lopez, Hector Ruiz, Don Tate, and Andrea White. Authors will visit with holiday shoppers and sign copies of their latest books, which Humanities Texas will have available for purchase at a discounted price. Or simply come by for good conversation and delicious homemade baked goods and hot coffee. Free parking will be available in the St. Martin’s Lutheran Church lot on the northwest corner of 15th and Rio Grande Streets. All proceeds from the book fair and bake sale will benefit Austin flood victims.

Visit www.humanitiestexas.org, contact us at 512-440-1991, or find us on Facebook or Twitter for more details about this event.

TILTS to host poet, novelist Gerald Vizenor on Sept. 5

Gerald Vizenor

Gerald Vizenor

The Texas Institute for Literary & Textual Studies (TILTS) welcomes the prolific poet and novelist Gerald Vizenor, a citizen of the White Earth Nation in Minnesota, for a public lecture on Survivance and Totemic Motion in Native American Indian Literature and Art. The lecture will be held in the Prothro Theater at the Harry Ransom Center on Thursday, September 5, at 3:30. A reception will follow in the Tom Lea Room, where the exhibit Native American Literature at the Harry Ransom Center will be on display.

The 2013-2014 edition of TILTS, Reading Race in Literature & Film, brings together scholars, artists, filmmakers, and writers for conversations about the ways that we experience race and ethnicity. As the leading theorist of Native American identity and representation, Vizenor has had a profound influence on indigenous, cultural, and literary studies. He was also a delegate to the White Earth Constitutional Convention and the principal writer of the new Constitution of the White Earth Nation in Minnesota. He is a professor emeritus at University California Berkley and currently professor of American Studies at the University of New Mexico.

About TILTS

TILTS is an annual, multidisciplinary initiative that showcases dynamic scholarship in literary and textual based studies. TILTS is sponsored by the Office of the President, the Vice-Provost, the College of Liberal Arts, and the Department of English of The University of Texas at Austin. Co-sponsors for this event include: Native American and Indigenous Studies, the Humanities Institute, and the Harry Ransom Center.

Writer Don DeLillo speaks on campus this Thursday

A page from the first draft of Don DeLillo's "Underworld."

A page from the first draft of Don DeLillo's "Underworld."

In conjunction with the Literature and Sport exhibition, Don DeLillo, author of Underworld, Pafko at the Wall, and End Zone, reads from his work on Thursday, July 25, at 7 p.m. in Jessen Auditorium in Homer Rainey Hall at The University of Texas at Austin. DeLillo’s archive resides at the Harry Ransom Center.

DeLillo is the author of 15 novels, including Falling Man, White Noise, and Libra. He has won the National Book Award, the PEN/Faulkner Award for Fiction, the Jerusalem Prize for his complete body of work, and the William Dean Howells Medal from the American Academy of Arts and Letters, among other honors. This spring he was named the first recipient of the Library of Congress Prize for American Fiction.

The event is free and open to the public. Seating is limited, and doors open at 6:20 p.m. for Ransom Center members and at 6:30 p.m. for the general public.

Stop by the Ransom Center’s visitor desk and sign up for eNews between 5 and 6:30 p.m.* on Thursday, July 25 to receive a copy of Don DeLillo’s novel Underworld. Don DeLillo’s reading follows at 7 p.m at Jessen Auditorium.

Materials from the novel are highlighted in the exhibition Literature and Sport, on view through August 4.

*While supplies last, one book per person.