Vick Center for Strategic Advising & Career Counseling Blog

To drop, or not to drop…

October 29th, 2013 · No Comments

That is the question…

The thought “I want to drop a class” can come up at any point in the semester, for a variety of reasons.  Maybe after a few weeks it turns out the class isn’t what you thought it was going to be, or maybe you thought it was going well, but after a few graded assignments or a test, you are starting to realize you don’t understand the material.  It could even be that something is going on in your life (outside of school) that is really affecting your performance in a class.

Whatever the reason, you might come to the realization that dropping a class is the best option for you to salvage your GPA (and your sanity), and you need to know how to make that happen.

How to drop a class:

  • After the 12th class day, but BEFORE the Q-drop deadline*, you have to schedule an appointment with your advisor to discuss the drop and sign the form.
  • After the Q-drop deadline, but BEFORE you take your final exam or receive a final grade for the course, you can ask your advisor about your eligibility for a One-Time Exception (OTE) Q-drop.
  • If you would like to drop a course after a final grade has been posted for the semester, you may schedule an appointment with your advisor to discuss your options.

What are the possible consequences of dropping a class?

  • After the 12th class day, if you drop a class – Q Drop – you will have a “Q” on your transcript as the grade in that class. Your GPA is not negatively affected by a Q, but you are only allowed six Q-drops while you are in college.
  • If you are dropping below 12 hours, you will be considered a part-time student. This MIGHT affect the following:
    • Your financial aid – contact a financial aid counselor to discuss this
    • On-campus housing
    • International status (for international students only)
    • Car & medical insurance – contact your insurance provider
    • Participation in extracurricular activities (for example: Fraternity/Sorority) – contact the organization
    • Your academic progress (completing degree requirements, internal transfer requirements, etc.)

What should you do?

If you are struggling in a class, for whatever reason, ALWAYS talk to your academic advisor to find out about all your options.

 

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Registration Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

October 14th, 2011 · No Comments

It’s that time again – time to register for classes! Sometimes it can be a stressful experience, but with a little advanced preparation, hopefully your registration will go smoothly!

TIP: Many of the answers to frequently asked questions can be found by utilizing the Students’ page of the UT Austin website. It is helpful if you take a look at that page, paying special attention to all the links in the boxes titled “Registration” and “Financial Matters,” before you contact your advisor.  Additionally, the Registrar’s Office has a very comprehensive list of answers to frequently asked questions regarding registration.

Here are answers to a few of the questions that we are asked most often during registration advising. We will continue to update this and add information as necessary.

Q: When do I register?
A: I have no idea.  I can tell  you that the general time period that registration occurs can be found on the academic calendar, but to find out your specific window of time you must check your Registration Information Sheet (RIS), which can be found on the Students’ page in the “Registration” box.  So go check it.  If it isn’t updated yet, then check it again later.

Q:  When is add/drop?
A:  Typically add/drop will occur just before the beginning of the new semester.  Again, the general time period that you will have access to the registration system for adds and drops can be found on the academic calendar, but to find out your specific window of time you must check your Registration Information Sheet (RIS), which can be found on the Students’ page in the “Registration” box.  If it isn’t updated yet, then check it again later.

Q: Where can I find the online course schedule and access to the registration system?
A: I bet you can guess…the Student’s page!

Q: How can I find out how much money I owe the University, and when it is due?
A: From the Students’ page, look in the “Financial Matters” box and click “Find out what I owe” after you register for classes.

Q: Why does my RIS show that I have a bar, and what does that mean?
A: There are different kinds of bars, but all of them will prevent you from registering for classes, so you will want to clear them before registration begins. Here are a few common bars, and what they might mean for you:

  • Advising bar – You have not met with your advisor to discuss next semester’s classes. Next step: Schedule an appointment with your advisor.
  • Medical bar – University Health Services (UHS) needs medical information from you. Next step: Contact UHS
  • Financial bar – You owe money for something (tuition, ID, parking ticket, campus doctor visit, etc.). Next step: Contact Student Accounts Receivable
  • Admissions bar – UT is missing a transcript from your high school or another college/university you attended. Next step: Contact the Office of Undergraduate Admissions
  • International bar – Someone in The International Office needs to meet with you. Next step: Contact the International Office
  • GIAC bar – The Graduate and International Admissions Center (GIAC) may need your final transcript or other information. Next step: Contact GIAC
  • Texas Success Initiative (TSI) bar – UT may need you to take a test to establish proficiency in reading, writing, or math. Next step: Contact the TSI Office
  • Dean of Students bar – This could mean that you need to update your emergency contact information online. Next step: Update your emergency contact info on your RIS, or contact the Dean of Students.

Q: All of the classes I want to take are closed or restricted. Now what?
A: Remember that during registration and add/drop periods, most UT students will be actively making changes to their schedules. This means that classes will close and open frequently. Here’s what you can do:

  • Contact the department offering the class. They’ll be able to give you an idea about why the class is restricted, whether seats may open up, and other steps you might take to get into the class. You can find department contact info in the course description under “See department headnote” or by using the “Offices” link on the UT homepage.
  • Add yourself to waitlists if possible.
  • Come up with a list of alternatives. These could include requirements for core curriculum, major, minor, or certificate programs, as well as exploratory electives. You and your advisor will come up with some of these together, but you are also responsible for exploring the options available on your own.
  • Register for something! If you do not register for anything, you will have a later add/drop time than students who registered and paid their bill on time. You might have to register for classes or professors you do not intend to keep, knowing that you WILL have the chance to make changes to your schedule before the semester starts.

Q: Is there a place where I can see reviews of professors and classes?
A: Course instructor surveys from each semester are posted online for you to review. “Instructor Survey Results” are available on the Students’ page in the “Registration” box.  Additionally, a link to review “Course Syllabi and Instructor CVs” is also posted in that same location.

Q: I want to take some classes at a community college over winter or summer break. How do I know what classes to take?
A: Meet with your advisor to discuss what classes you may want to take outside of UT. Then use the Automated Transfer Equivalency (ATE) system to ensure that the classes you take elsewhere will transfer appropriately to UT Austin. You will need to contact an advisor at the other school to discuss your eligibility for classes at that institution.

Q: How do I claim my credit-by-exam, and which ones should I claim?
A: Appropriate scores on AP exams, CLEP tests, and other placement exams can give you credit for certain classes; UT gives you the option to claim these credits for your academic record. Talk to your advisor about which of these you should claim, if any. Once you know which credits you would like to claim credit for, you can do so online by going to the Students’ page and selecting the “Placement Exam & Course Petitioning” link in the “Academic Support” box.

Do you have a general question that you don’t see answered here?  Check the Registrar’s FAQ or ask us in the comments!

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The lowdown on dropping classes.

September 9th, 2011 · No Comments

student getting drop form“I want to drop a class.”

This thought can come up at any point in the semester, for a variety of reasons.  Maybe after a few weeks it turns out the class isn’t what you thought it was going to be, or maybe you thought it was going well, but after a few graded assignments or a test, you are starting to realize you don’t understand the material.  It could even be that something is going on in your life (outside of school) that is really affecting your performance in a class.

Whatever the reason, you might come to the realization that dropping a class is the best option for you to salvage your GPA (and your sanity), and you need to know how to make that happen.

How to drop a class:

  • During the first 12 class days you can drop a class on your own, using the online registration system, and it’s as if the class was never on your schedule – it just disappears.
  • After the 12th class day, but BEFORE the Q-drop deadline*, you have to:
    • Schedule an appointment with your advisor to discuss and pick up the drop form.
    • Get your professor’s signature on the form.
    • Bring the form back to your advising office.
  • After the Q-drop deadline, but BEFORE you take your final exam or receive a final grade for the course, you can ask your advisor about eligibility for a One-Time Exception (OTE) drop.
  • If you would like to drop a course after a final grade has been posted for the semester, you may schedule an appointment with your advisor to discuss your options.

What are the possible consequences of dropping a class?

  • After the 12th class day, if you drop a class – Q Drop – you will have a “Q” on your transcript as the grade in that class. Your GPA is not negatively affected by a Q, but you are only allowed six Q-drops while you are in college.
  • If you are dropping below 12 hours, you will be considered a part-time student. This MIGHTaffect the following:
    • Your financial aid – contact a financial aid counselor to discuss this
    • On-campus housing
    • International status (for international students only)
    • Car & medical insurance – contact your insurance provider
    • Participation in extracurricular activities (for example: Fraternity/Sorority) – contact the organization
    • Your academic progress (completing degree requirements, internal transfer requirements, etc.)

What should you do?

If you are struggling in a class, for whatever reason, ALWAYS talk to your academic advisor to find out about all your options.


Tags: Uncategorized

First week of classes – what to do?

August 22nd, 2011 · No Comments

Gone to UGS

Ready or not, in two days classes begin for the fall 2011 semester.  Have you been obsessively checking your waitlists and making adjustments to your schedule?  Or did you get the perfect schedule on your first try and now you’re just busy trying to find textbooks? Either way, here is a list of things to know about the first week of classes and a few things you can be doing to ensure a great start to your fall semester!

To-do list for the first week of classes:

  • Have a quick question for your advisor?  Stop by the Center for Strategic Advising to speak to an advisor, no appointment necessary during the following times:
    • Drop-in Hours: FAC 338, August 24, 25, 28, and 29 from 8:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.
  • Still want to make changes to your schedule? You can!
    • You can drop courses using the online registration system until the 12th class day (Sept. 9th).
    • You can add classes using the online registration system until the 4th class day (Aug. 29th).
    • If you need to add a class after the 4th class day, you must be added by the department that offers the course. For example, to add a a Sociology course, you must contact the Sociology department. Use the “Offices” link on the UT homepage to find department contact info.
      • To double check these dates and deadlines, or to find out about other important ones, you can check the Academic Calendar online.
  • Want to know more about the classes you’ve signed up for?  Read the syllabus or the instructor CV (it’s like a resume) in advance.
  • Attend the Sanger Learning & Career Center Open House to learn more about their services, eat free ice cream, and get a free academic planner (while supplies last).

Class of 2015 and new transfer students:

  • New UGS students attend Gone to UGS and enjoy free food before walking together as a college to the university-wide Gone to Texas ceremony!
    • Tuesday, Aug. 23rd, FAC Patio from 6:30-8:00 p.m.
    • Wear the UGS t-shirt you were given during orientation for free food.
    • Please RSVP online for Gone to UGS.

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So you attended orientation, now what?

July 19th, 2011 · No Comments

UGS OrientationThe Center for Strategic Advising welcomed over 1,000 new UGS students this summer, and even more students are on the way before the Fall 2011 semester begins next month! If you participated in orientation and met your academic advisor, you may be asking yourself – what can I do between now and the first day of classes on August 24th?

Well, here are some items to add to your checklist…

Summer to-do list:

Don’t forget to bring your UGS student handbook back to campus with you. Also, remember to bookmark the current students page for additional resources.

Is your question or concern not addressed in the to-do list? Post your question in the comments section and we’ll help you out!

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