No One’s “Fault”

Image Credit: Rong-Gong Lin II, via Los Angeles Times

Image Credit: Rong-Gong Lin II, via Los Angeles Times

This summer, as was reported by the Los Angeles Times, a Bay Area curb with a famous kink was “fixed.” This particular curb junction has been observed and monitored by geologists for many decades as a marker that represents the activity of the Hayward fault line. While the fault has created visible cracks in Hayward City Hall and other area sidewalks, this particular curb had been documented since the 1970s, as can be seen in the images from produced from scanned slides here.

Source: Los Angeles Times

Historical Philadelphian Artifacts Preserved in an Unlikely Location

Image Credit: Museum of the American Revolution

Image Credit: Museum of the American Revolution

Prior to the start of construction of the new Museum of the American Revolution in Philadelphia designed by Robert A.M. Stern, archaeologists discovered a plethora of artifacts from the row houses that originally existed on the site. The excavation process occurred over the course of the past two years, during which twelve outhouses were discovered containing preserved belongings. The artifacts had survived two separate significant construction periods in the 19th and 20th centuries; many of the artifacts will be displayed in the new museum.

Source: Philly Mag

Awareness Through Chopsticks

Image Credit: Spoon-Tamago.com

Image Credit: Spoon-Tamago.com

Advertising student Yavez Anthonio has created a Kickstarter campaign to fund production of chopsticks made using plastic collected from the ocean. Anthonio plans to sell his product exclusively to sushi restaurants that serve fish that have been extracted from the ocean in a sustainable manner in an effort to “acknowledge another serious problem facing our seas: overfishing.”

Source: Spoon and Tamago

The Getty Research Portal: A Digitized Art Historical Goldmine

Image Credit: The Iris

Image Credit: The Iris

The Getty Research Portal, a free, online database that grants the public access to digitized art historical texts, now exceeds 100,000 volumes. In addition to plentiful research resources, the portal has also reconfigured its searching capabilities to allow for improved ease of use. It has also recently incorporated new contributions from major libraries, including the Menil Collection Library in Houston.

Source: The Iris: Behind the Scenes at the Getty

Harmonic Highways

Image Credit: Washington State Department of Transportation

Image Credit: Washington State Department of Transportation

A portion of Route 66 that crosses through New Mexico has been altered to produce music through the introduction of “rumble strips.” However, the chosen song, America the Beautiful, is only intelligible when a motorist drives at the designated speed limit. 99 Percent Invisible reports, “Go too fast and the pitch is transposed higher and the tempo is increased,” which promises an audibly uncomfortable experience for a driver.

Source: 99 Percent Invisible

Weaving the Courtyard

07_05_2016

Image Credit: Dezeen.com

New York City’s MoMA PS1 has selected the Summer 2016 winner for its Young Architects Program. Dezeen reports that Escobedo Soliz Studio has won with its thin, woven, multi-colored ceiling plane. The installation, called “Weaving the Courtyard,” utilizes the holes from the form ties of the existing PS1 vertical concrete walls. The intensity of the weaving changes across the courtyard to offer a variety of shading conditions. 

Source: Dezeen

Floating Piers

Image Credit: Wolfgang Volz, via DesignBoom

Image Credit: Wolfgang Volz, via DesignBoom

A temporary installation floated atop Lake Iseo in Italy for 16 days during the month of June, accessible to the public and free of charge. Christo, and his late partner Jeanne-Claude, originated the concept in 1970. After changing the intended location of the piece multiple times, this particular Italian lake was chosen in 2014. Floating Piers, as the work was called, was a continuous strand that traced both the water and the adjacent city streets.

Source: DesignBoom

Architecture of War

 

Image Source: Gianni Cipriano, via New York Times

Image Credit: Gianni Cipriano, via New York Times

This year’s 15th Venice Architecture Biennale includes “The Evidence Room,” a space that exhibits full-scale representations of artifacts from a World War II death camp. Robert Jan van Pelt, Donald McKay, Anne Bordeleau, and Sascha Hastings from the University of Waterloo comprised the interdisciplinary team that constructed these replicas of designed objects that were used for to carry out atrocities. According to The New York Times, “An inscription near the entrance describes the death camps as ‘the greatest crime committed by architects.’ ” Represented exclusively in shades of white, the exhibition promises to encourage viewers to spend a moment in silent remembrance.

Source: The New York Times

Tate Modern: Revisited

 

Image Credit: Iwan Baan, via New York Times

Image Credit: Iwan Baan, via The New York Times

Herzog & de Meuron’s addition to London’s Tate Modern opened last Friday, June 17. The New York Times reports that the Switch House, as the new wing is called, is intended for the display of contemporary work that ranges from film to installations. One of Tate’s curators, Catherine Wood, stated, “The idea is really to show […] the kinds of pieces that don’t need or want a white cube space.” Herzog & de Meuron’s choice to leave sections of the original power station untouched challenges prototypically designed exhibition spaces.

Source: The New York Times

A Resource of Colossal Scale

Image Credit: Colossus

Image Credit: Colossus, published in Progressive Architecture (June 1987, pages 14-15)

North Carolina Modernist Homes and Hanley Wood are compiling an online archive of twentieth-century architecture publications. This resource, named Colossus: Architecture Magazine Archive, promises to allow those interested in architectural history access to scanned copies of the AIA Journal, Architectural Forum, and additional titles that date back to the Modernist era. ArchDaily reports that, “When complete, it will be the largest digital archive of modern architecture magazines, with over 1.3 million pages.” Access Colossal digital archive here.

Source: ArchDaily

Banksy Surprise

Photo credit: Jon Kay

Photo credit: Jon Kay

Elementary students in Bristol, England were surprised when they returned after a break to find a mural by acclaimed street artist, Banksy, on one of the school’s buildings. The students at Bridge Farm Primary School had recently voted to rename the building after Banksy. The elusive artist rewarded them with a work of art on their campus. The artist left a hand-written note to the students as well. The final line reading, “…it’s always easier to get forgiveness than permission.”

Source: This is Collosal