Bike Thieves Beware!

Image Credit: Dezeen

Image Credit: Dezeen

The SkunkLock is a bicycle lock that releases a rancid scent when punctured with a cutting device. Aiming to thwart bike thieves, the lock produces a scent so horrible that it induces vomiting. Those who developed the design claim that, because the SkunkLock does not cause any permanent damage, it is legal to utilize in the United States. According to Dezeen, this project has received enough financial backing so that locks will be available for purchase in summer 2017.

Source: Dezeen

Mending the Broken Earth

Image Credit: Estelle Chrétien

Image Credit: Estelle Chrétien

French artist Estelle Chrétien’s newest earthwork evokes memories of stitched-up injuries or unraveling clothing. “Ground Operation”—which features a split section of turf seemingly stitched back together with a white cord—instills in the viewer the importance of mankind’s role in molding the earth. Chrétien juxtaposes small-scale handicrafts with the kinds of agricultural and infrastructural interventions that change the landscape. According to Chrétien, the earthwork “…questions our relationship to natural resources,” helping us to realize our impact.

Source: The Creators Project

10,000 Glowing Books Fill a Toronto Street

Image Credit: Inhabitat

Image Credit: Inhabitat

A group of Spanish artists known as Luzinterruptus took over a Toronto street to create a stream of glowing books. The installation, titled “Literature vs. Traffic,” aims to create an oasis of literature in the midst of a bustling city, creating a place where visitors can read, reflect, and “succumb to the humble power of the written word.” Luzinterruptus illegally carried out the installation in New York and Madrid before obtaining permission from Toronto to fill the streets with books donated by the Salvation Army. The seemingly floating books remained on the city street until visitors dismantled the exhibit, each taking home a piece of the tranquil river.

Source: Inhabitat

 

Shark-Shaped Underwater Vehicle

Image Credit: Dezeen

Image Credit: Dezeen

Ortega has released the fastest electric submersible—a vessel designed for divers to access the depths of the sea at a faster pace, effectively conserving their oxygen supply. Below water, it can reach speeds of up to 8 knots. The shark-shaped vessel contains four self-changing batteries as well as a breathing apparatus, more air supply, and a navigation system.

Source: Dezeen

Could Hyperloop Be the Future of Mass Transit?

 

Source: Hyperloop One

Image Credit: Hyperloop One

Elon Musk’s open-source Hyperloop transportation system could revolutionize the way we commute—and possibly sooner than expected. Hyperloop One, one of the companies racing to build Musk’s design, recently released a teaser video for a route between Abu Dhabi and Dubai. The Hyperloop consists of a series of air-cushioned pods travelling through a semi-vacuum sealed tube, which propels the pods at incredibly high speeds. The system could carry passengers from San Francisco to Los Angeles in under forty minutes. Customer comfort and financial feasibility concerns are still being explored, but for now, companies like Hyperloop One are determined to create a working prototype route.

Source: Dezeen

A Visual Essay of Boston’s Historic Commute

Image Credit: The Boston Globe

Image Credit: The Boston Globe

In 1944, the first of the trolleys on Boston’s Mattapan Line emerged from Worcester’s Pullman-Standard factory. The bright orange-and-white trolleys, which are still in service, have carried commuters to their destinations for more than seventy years. While the trolleys are fully equipped with modern safety and navigation systems, the historic interiors of the vehicles remain intact. The line winds through wooded areas and nature preserves, eventually intersecting with the surface street. See the full visual essay from the Boston Globe here.

Source: The Boston Globe

Guerrilla Tactics Lead to Sanctioned Bike Lane

Image Credit: San Francisco Municipal Transformation Authority via City Lab

Image Credit: San Francisco Municipal Transformation Authority via City Lab

The San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency has retroactively approved a bike lane. This statement may not seem strange until you learn that The San Francisco Municipal Transformation Authority (SFMTrA) painted the bounds and installed the white soft hit posts. SFMTrA is an organization that has been using guerrilla tactics to improve the safety of Bay Area bicyclists without official permission—refusing to wait for an official response to conditions that contribute to cyclists being put in harm’s way.

Source: City Lab

Paper Menagerie

Image credit: Inhabitat

Image credit: Inhabitat

Artist Chie Hitotsuyama and her team have spent countless hours creating strikingly lifelike sculptures of animals from around the world. The sculptures, which portray animals like sea turtles, elephants, and chameleons, are handmade by wetting, rolling, folding, and stacking pieces of paper until they come to life. The team takes advantage of the different colored printing on each piece of newsprint, creating colorful gradients that portray the actual coloring of the animals the sculptures represent. The fluidity of the almost life-sized sculptures contrasts with the rigidity of traditional paper origami, creating a sense of organic growth out of the typically structured paper material.

Source: Inhabitat

A New Model for the Grocery Store: Vertical Farms

Image source: Inhabitat

Image source: Inhabitat

Starting in Spring 2017, some Target shoppers will have access to fresh, pesticide-free produce grown on-site inside the store. Indoor vertical farms that produce greens and herbs will be installed in a few select Target stores as part of a collaboration between the retail chain and MIT’s Media Lab. By growing produce in-house, stores have more control over food quality and safety while consumers are privy to the food production process that has been obscured by modern food distribution systems. The vertical gardens allow shoppers to see the origins of their food while further shortening the distance from the farm to the frying pan.

Source: Inhabitat

Hotel? Notel!

Image Credit: Pop Up City

Image Credit: Pop Up City

Melbourne, Australia, is home to Notel, a ‘not-hotel’ that is composed of six Airstream trailers located on an urban rooftop. These trailers serve as sleeping pods located adjacent a shared rooftop space. After requesting access online, guests are given an entry code to access the rooftop and are not required to check-in or interact with a concierge as they show themselves to their respective Airstream.

Source: Pop Up City

Back to the Brutal

Image Credit: Ezra Stoller, via New York Times

Image Credit: Ezra Stoller, via New York Times

The New York Times reports that Brutalist architecture is on the rebound and claimes that this newfound appreciation is not birthed from the original ideals of the aesthetic. While Brutalism was conceived in an effort to achieve material honesty and overall goodness, the article argues the growing popularity today is one of superficiality. At this point in history, the buildings lend themselves to carefully-framed and filtered Instagram posts and Tumblr pages, which leaves this original “honesty” in question.

Source: New York Times