“Vessel” Brings Interactive Art to the Heart of New York

Image Credit: Dezeen

Image Credit: Dezeen

An intricate, winding honeycomb structure called Vessel will be the new centerpiece of the Hudson Yards development, situated on Manhattan’s West Side. Aiming to create art that “…everybody could use, touch, [and] relate to,” designer Thomas Heatherwick connected a network of stairs and landings to create an interactive public gathering space. The finished structure will be vase-shaped and 150 feet across at its widest point. The finished landmark will include a landscaped area with gardens, groves of trees, and a river fountain.

Source: Dezeen

Visit Exhibitions from the Past with MoMA’s New Archive

Image Credit: MoMA

Image Credit: MoMA

The Museum of Modern Art has released a digital image archive that contains images of exhibitions from the museum’s opening in 1929 to today. Featuring more than 33,000 photographs, press releases, catalogues, and more, the archive is free-of-charge to use and provides an in-depth look at the MoMA’s rich history. This archive provides context that will allow for a deeper understanding of the place of modern art in our society. Search the collection on MoMA’s website here.

Source: ArtForum

 

Columbia University Releases 10,000 Architectural Images

Columbia University’s Graduate School of Architecture, Preservation, and Planning and the Avery Architectural and Fine Arts Library have released 10,000 architectural sections, plans, and related imagery through online image database Artstor. The collection is based on the GSAPP’s History of Modern Architecture class, with projects ranging from 1871 to 2013. The primary focus of the collection is 20th century architecture, including projects from Le Corbusier, Walter Gropius, Adolf Loos, Zaha Hadid and Rem Koolhaas. Sketches, posters, and photographs are represented in the collection in addition to sections and plans. View the collection at Artstor here.

Source: Artstor Blog

Traditional Materials Meet Cutting-Edge Methods in Iran’s First Free Form Brick Structure

Image Credit: Mohammad Soroosh Jooshesh (ADAPt)

Image Credit: ADAPt

Using RhinoVault, a Rhino plugin that “enables ‘funicular form-finding’,” a group of architects called ADAPt have created FaBRICKate, a free-form brick structure located in Iran. FaBRICKate combines a traditionally rigid, linear material with modern technologies that allow brickwork to be seen in a new light. After running computer simulations for material strength and wind force, ADAPt created two steel rod waffle grids to be used as formwork. The structure utilizes several different coursing patterns in order to maximize the design’s flexibility. The resulting vault is an extremely stable and visually striking illustration of the marriage between digital design and handmade craft.

Source: ArchDaily

 

Trading Footprints

Image Credit: Tesla

Image Credit: Tesla

Located in the desert of Nevada, it is said that Tesla’s 5.8-million-square-foot Gigafactory will be complete by 2020. The Gigafactory’s footprint will be the largest one in the world. The construction is meant to alleviate shipping costs between manufacturing locations and will, in turn, create 6,000 jobs as well as generate most of its necessary energy from the photo-voltaic panels that span the entire roof.

Source: Architizer

A Photographic Essay of New Belgrade’s Communist Architecture

Image Credit: Piotr Bednarki

Image Credit: Piotr Bednarki

Architectural photographer Piotr Bednarski explains that New Belgrade is unique in comparison to his hometown of Warsaw, which does not have many untouched residential constructions from the Communist Era. One of the Serbian capital city’s municipalities, New Belgrade exemplifies the stark contrast between the densely-packed built areas and the flat open areas that were typical of communist design. See Bednarkski’s images here.

Source: ArchDaily

No One’s “Fault”

Image Credit: Rong-Gong Lin II, via Los Angeles Times

Image Credit: Rong-Gong Lin II, via Los Angeles Times

This summer, as was reported by the Los Angeles Times, a Bay Area curb with a famous kink was “fixed.” This particular curb junction has been observed and monitored by geologists for many decades as a marker that represents the activity of the Hayward fault line. While the fault has created visible cracks in Hayward City Hall and other area sidewalks, this particular curb had been documented since the 1970s, as can be seen in the images from produced from scanned slides here.

Source: Los Angeles Times

Historical Philadelphian Artifacts Preserved in an Unlikely Location

Image Credit: Museum of the American Revolution

Image Credit: Museum of the American Revolution

Prior to the start of construction of the new Museum of the American Revolution in Philadelphia designed by Robert A.M. Stern, archaeologists discovered a plethora of artifacts from the row houses that originally existed on the site. The excavation process occurred over the course of the past two years, during which twelve outhouses were discovered containing preserved belongings. The artifacts had survived two separate significant construction periods in the 19th and 20th centuries; many of the artifacts will be displayed in the new museum.

Source: Philly Mag

Awareness Through Chopsticks

Image Credit: Spoon-Tamago.com

Image Credit: Spoon-Tamago.com

Advertising student Yavez Anthonio has created a Kickstarter campaign to fund production of chopsticks made using plastic collected from the ocean. Anthonio plans to sell his product exclusively to sushi restaurants that serve fish that have been extracted from the ocean in a sustainable manner in an effort to “acknowledge another serious problem facing our seas: overfishing.”

Source: Spoon and Tamago

The Getty Research Portal: A Digitized Art Historical Goldmine

Image Credit: The Iris

Image Credit: The Iris

The Getty Research Portal, a free, online database that grants the public access to digitized art historical texts, now exceeds 100,000 volumes. In addition to plentiful research resources, the portal has also reconfigured its searching capabilities to allow for improved ease of use. It has also recently incorporated new contributions from major libraries, including the Menil Collection Library in Houston.

Source: The Iris: Behind the Scenes at the Getty

Harmonic Highways

Image Credit: Washington State Department of Transportation

Image Credit: Washington State Department of Transportation

A portion of Route 66 that crosses through New Mexico has been altered to produce music through the introduction of “rumble strips.” However, the chosen song, America the Beautiful, is only intelligible when a motorist drives at the designated speed limit. 99 Percent Invisible reports, “Go too fast and the pitch is transposed higher and the tempo is increased,” which promises an audibly uncomfortable experience for a driver.

Source: 99 Percent Invisible