SXSW ‘Infinity’ Installation Alters Your Perception of Space

Image credit: DesignBoom

Image credit: DesignBoom

Artist Refik Anadol has created an immersive light-filled installation that alters visitors’ perception of space and time. The mirrored chamber, which was showcased at the 2017 SXSW festival, surrounds participants with a programmed light show that features psychedelic patterns and disorienting shapes. Anadol describes the project as something that “…facilitates a temporary release from our habitual perceptions and culturally biased assumptions about being in the world, to enable us—however momentarily—to perceive ourselves and the world around us freshly.”

Source: DesignBoom

Photographer Documents the Same Buildings Year After Year

Image Credit: Camilo Jose Vergara

Image Credit: Camilo Jose Vergara

Photographer Camilo Jose Vergara has spent the past forty years photographing decaying buildings in low-income American neighborhoods in his project titled “Tracking Time.” Vergara’s image sets reveal the life span of several buildings as they decline, are demolished, or are restored. The photographs reveal both gradual and drastic changes in the built environment, showing how social and economic factors impact the world we live in. In some cases, Vergara documented entire streetscapes, illustrating the loss and change low income communities face.

Source: Messy Nessy

Massive JFK Sculpture Sits in a Hidden Desert Bunker

Image credit: Lance Gerber

Image credit: Lance Gerber

As part of Desert X, a showcase of site-specific artwork taking place in the Coachella Valley, artist Will Boone has buried a larger-than-life sculpture of John F. Kennedy in the same kind of underground bunker he would have used in case of a nuclear attack. Boone’s work was influenced by his emotional connection to Kennedy’s assassination as a native Texan. He hopes that the installation ‘speaks not just to all those things that have been driven underground since the extinguished optimism of the sixties but to those same fears – nuclear attack at the invasion of the other – that have been so vividly resurrected in recent times.’

Source: DesignBoom

Frank Lloyd Wright’s Missing Works Become Photorealistic Renderings

Trinity Chapel rendering Image Credit: David Romero

Trinity Chapel rendering
Image Credit: David Romero

Spanish architect David Romero has created a series of renderings that portray the missing works of Frank Lloyd Wright. Two of the works were demolished, including the Larkin Administration Building and the Rose Pauson House, while one of the works—the Trinity Chapel—was never built. Using AutoCad, 3dsMax, Vray, and Photoshop, Romero recreated these works of architecture so that current generations could enjoy them. Although Romero was forced to take some liberties with the buildings, the renderings are meant to portray Wright’s ideas as accurately as possible.

Source: Archdaily

32,000 Straws Turned Into Homemade Camera

Image credit: Petapixel

Image credit: Petapixel

A homemade camera created by placing 32,000 straws in a wooden box results in beautifully abstract, pixelated photographic images. The camera, which was first created in 2007 by Michael Farrell and Cliff Haynes, turns each straw into a miniature camera that projects an image onto photo-sensitive paper. The image formed by each straw comes together to create large, intricate photographs. Because each straw is slightly different, the resulting images have an ethereal, disorienting atmospheric quality.

Source: Petapixel

Online Quiz Turns the World Upside Down

Image credit: Pentagram

Image credit: Pentagram

Would you recognize your home country upside-down? The London office of design consultancy Pentagram created an interactive quiz that allows users to prove their geographic savvy. The quiz is based on the notion that cardinal directions are man-made concepts that change our perception of geography. Users are asked questions about cities and countries with map images that are presented upside-down or sideways. Try out your geographical skills here.

Source: Visual News

Television Popularity Maps Highlight America’s Cultural Divides

Duck Dynasty popularity Image credit: The New York Times

Duck Dynasty popularity
Image credit: The New York Times

The New York Times has published a series of maps that measure the popularity of different television shows across the United States. The maps, which analyze shows like Duck Dynasty, Modern Family, and Criminal Minds, reveal the differences, for example, between rural and urban viewers.

Source: The New York Times

Tiny Embroidered Food Looks Good Enough to Eat

Image credit: ipnot

Image credit: ipnot

Japanese embroidery artist ipnot spends hours combining the right colors of thread to create intricate, realistic depictions of food. The completed pieces are stunningly lifelike; although the pieces are embroidered on a flat plane, the texture and color of the works produces convincing three-dimensional images. Ipnot’s creations include miniature matcha tea, a tiny bowl of ramen with thread for noodles, and a textured, multicolored roll of embroidered sushi. View ipnot’s creations on her Instagram

Source: Spoon-Tamago

 

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Food Waste Fuels British Supermarket Chain’s Newest Trucks

Image credit: Inhabitat

Image credit: Inhabitat

Upscale British supermarket chain Waitrose is taking sustainability one step further by powering the newest trucks in its fleet with food waste. Ten of the chain’s trucks will be fueled by biomethane, a fuel produced by harvesting the gas generated by rotting food. Biomethane emits 70 percent less carbon dioxide than diesel and costs 40 percent less to produce. CNG Fuels claims that the upgrades will pay for themselves in two to three years.

Source: Inhabitat

Lancaster, California Could Be First Zero Net Energy City in the U.S.

Image Credit: Inhabitat

Image Credit: Inhabitat

The city of Lancaster, California has proposed an ordinance that will require all new homes to be fitted with solar panels or employ other forms of environmental mitigation. The ordinance would put the city closer to becoming a Zero Net Energy city, meaning that the city’s energy consumption would roughly equal the city’s renewable energy production. Currently, the city is conducting a feasibility study to determine whether or not the program should be implemented.

Source: Inhabitat

Original Peace Symbol Sketches to be Exhibited in London

Original design by Gerald Holtom. Image Credit: Commonweal Collection

Original design by Gerald Holtom.
Image Credit: Commonweal Collection

It’s hard to imagine a time when the peace symbol wasn’t widely recognized as a sign of the counterculture and anti-war movements. The familiar three-pronged glyph was first created in 1958 by artist Gerald Holtom as a symbol for a series of anti-nuclear weapon demonstrations. Holtom used the visual language of flag semaphores for the design, combining the letters “N” and “D” for “nuclear disarmament.” Visitors will be able to view Holtom’s fragile original sketches of the symbol at the Imperial War Museum in London from March 23 to August 28, 2017.

Source: This is Colossal

“Breathing” Pillow Lulls Users to Sleep

Image Credit: Somnox

Image Credit: Somnox

Dutch design team TU Delft has created a pillow that soothes users to sleep with the slow, rhythmic sound of breathing. The pillow, dubbed Somnox, has embedded sensors to determine whether the user is awake or asleep. The data is then used to alter the breathing pattern of the pillow in order to stimulate calm breathing in the user. In addition to helping users sleep, the pillow gently wakes users up with a gradually increasing light that simulates the sunrise.

Source: Dezeen