Category Archives: architecture

Drawing Post-Digitally

In an article for Metropolis, Sam Jacob explains that the proliferation of photo-realistic renderings has brought about a resurgence in drawing. He argues that today’s architects who have been raised in a digital world are fascinated with “the super-collage possibilities of Photoshop and the extreme flatness of Illustrator that established a different kind of image discourse: one that considered other types of digital space, other forms of graphic quality, and simultaneously a set of alternative architectural propositions.” It seems that the envisioned all-digital future of architecture may appear the way we foresaw.

Source: Metropolis

BUILD: A Real-Life, Physical Design Space by Autodesk

On October 5, 2016, Autodesk announced “the opening of its Boston-based Autodesk Building, Innovation, Learning and Design (BUILD) Space, a unique industrial workshop and innovation studio focused on the future of making things in the built environment.” The space allows designers to utilize specialty equipment such as waterjet cutters, robots, routers, and a 5-ton crane. There is a “BUILDers in Residence program” for which project teams may apply and, once admitted, may participate free of charge as long as the team provides its own materials.

Source: Autodesk BUILD Space

Frank Lloyd Wright’s Missing Works Become Photorealistic Renderings

Trinity Chapel rendering Image Credit: David Romero

Trinity Chapel rendering
Image Credit: David Romero

Spanish architect David Romero has created a series of renderings that portray the missing works of Frank Lloyd Wright. Two of the works were demolished, including the Larkin Administration Building and the Rose Pauson House, while one of the works—the Trinity Chapel—was never built. Using AutoCad, 3dsMax, Vray, and Photoshop, Romero recreated these works of architecture so that current generations could enjoy them. Although Romero was forced to take some liberties with the buildings, the renderings are meant to portray Wright’s ideas as accurately as possible.

Source: Archdaily

Hollywood Takes on Mies van der Rohe’s Farnsworth House

Image credit: Archdaily

Image credit: Archdaily

The tale of Mies van der Rohe’s Farnsworth House will soon become a major feature film. The movie, starring Jeff Bridges as Mies and Maggie Gyllenhaal as Dr. Edith Farnsworth, chronicles the now-debunked tale of the passionate and ill-fated client-architect relationship. No further details have been released about the film, but the pairing of romance and architecture is sure to draw fans from all over.

Source: Archdaily

Study Shows Architecture Majors Work the Hardest in College

Image Credit: Beraldo Leal

Image Credit: Beraldo Leal

A new study conducted by Indiana University’s National Study of Student Engagement claims that architecture majors spend more time out of the classroom studying or working on projects than any other major. Coming in at a whopping 22.2 hours of additional work a week compared to a communications major’s 12.18 hours a week or an engineering student’s 19.66 hours a week, architecture majors seem to live in their studios more than they live in their dorms. How many hours a week do you spend in the studio?

Source: Archinect

Valentine’s Day Cards for Architecture Nerds

Image credit: Bob Rattray

Image credit: Bob Rattray

What happens when you combine a profession terrified of kitsch with the cheesiest tradition of all? Archdaily answers the question for us with “105 Valentines for Architects and Architecture Lovers.” The cards range from architecture-related puns to building forms in the shape of hearts. There’s no better way to express your love for trusses, Autodesk, and Loos than with these fun Valentines.

Source: ArchDaily

Surreal Animation Explores Piranesi’s Etchings

Image Credit: Gregoire Dupond

Image Credit: Gregoire Dupond

Italian artist Grégoire Dupond’s has stitched together sixteen Piranesi etchings in a dynamic animation. The eleven minute long video projects Piranesi’s etchings on a three-dimensional plane, taking the viewer on a trip through the fictional prisons in the “Carceri” series. The original prints, first published in 1750, portray a fictional labyrinth prison that evoke a dream world created in Piranesi’s mind. The animation presents the surreal etchings in a startlingly realistic light; as the video progresses, the viewer feels as though they are a visitor in Piranesi’s world.

Source: Gregoire Dupond

Ikea Wins Design Award for Refugee Shelter

Image Credit: The Design Museum

Image Credit: The Design Museum

The Design Museum of London has awarded the 2016 Beazley Design of the Year award to Ikea for its flat-packed “Better Shelter.” The refugee shelter features a solar-powered wall and can be assembled in four hours. Currently, over 30,000 of these shelters are in use all over the world, offering privacy and comfort to those displaced by conflicts and disasters. The “Better Shelter” can be dismantled and reassembled in a few hours, making it a practical solution for those seeking temporary housing.

Source: Curbed

This Treehouse is All Grown Up

Image credit: Johan Jansson

Image credit: Johan Jansson

Snøhetta channels a modern Middle Earth in ‘The 7th Room,’ a contemporary cabin located in northern Sweden. The cabin keeps treetops company ten meters above the ground, complementing its serene, natural setting. Up to five people can stay in the cabin, which must be reached by staircase and features two bedrooms, a lounge, a bathroom, and an outdoor terrace. The design channels traditional Nordic techniques while maintaining a distinctly modern form.

Source: Designboom

Tiny Transitional Housing for Seattle’s Homeless

Image Credit: Inhabitat

Image Credit: Inhabitat

Inhabitat reports that a group of teenagers from Seattle have partnered with various organizations to design, build, and distribute tiny houses for the city’s homeless. These houses will serve as inexpensive, transitional solutions for those in need until affordable housing is secured for them. Sawhorse Revolution, the organization in charge of this effort, claims that this process has helped these teens develop the empathy required to work with any client, which promises to serve them well in their futures.

Source: Inhabitat

Cost-Competitive Tesla Powerwall

Image Credit: Tesla

Image Credit: Tesla

Energy consultancy CME has calculated that a Tesla Powerwall 2.0 and rooftop solar panels are cost-competitive to traditional grid power. The consultancy’s study looked at a hypothetical home located in Adelaide, Australia, where the assumed power use would be around 4,800 kilowatt-hours of electricity a year. Taking into account the ten-year lifespan of a Powerwall 2.0 and the twenty-year lifespan of rooftop solar panels, the study found that the price powering a home equipped with these technologies was lower than the price of using grid power before discounts. In the future, solar powered homes could be the norm as countries shift away from fossil fuel sources toward renewable energy.

Source: Inhabitat