Category Archives: images

Drawing Post-Digitally

In an article for Metropolis, Sam Jacob explains that the proliferation of photo-realistic renderings has brought about a resurgence in drawing. He argues that today’s architects who have been raised in a digital world are fascinated with “the super-collage possibilities of Photoshop and the extreme flatness of Illustrator that established a different kind of image discourse: one that considered other types of digital space, other forms of graphic quality, and simultaneously a set of alternative architectural propositions.” It seems that the envisioned all-digital future of architecture may appear the way we foresaw.

Source: Metropolis

Scenic Springfield

Image credit: Scenic Simpsons

Image credit: Scenic Simpsons

While some may cite “The Simpsons” as one of America’s most well-loved cultural exports, few would recognize the series as something that could be considered visually beautiful. The Instagram account Scenic Simpsons proves that striking composition is something that we can add to our list of reasons to love the show. Scenic Simpsons is dedicated to “showcasing the most beautiful scenes, colors, sets and abstract compositions from Springfield.” View some of the stills captured by Scenic Simpsons here.

Source: ArchDaily

Put a Bird on It

A Portland police officer looked out his window one evening to the sight of thousands of black starlings settled on the tops of snow-covered trees. Walker Berg, the C.S.I. who noticed the birds, quickly grabbed his DSLR to photograph the stunning site. The police department named the image Crows on Snow and posted it to social media.

Source: This is Colossal

Color Swatches from Your Favorite Films

Image Credit: Movies in Color

Image Credit: Movies in Color

Roxy Radulescu, creator of the Movies in Color blog, discusses her project with Visual News by explaining, “[T]he blog has not only been an aesthetic pursuit but also an educational pursuit.” Movies in Color presents select stills from famous films with adjacent color swatches in order to enlighten viewers about the tones included in the composition. This approach helps us understand the role that color plays in evoking emotion, a sensibility that is necessary for those in highly-visual disciplines.

Source: Visual News

Converting Analog Photos to Digital Images

Image Credit: Wall Street Journal

Image Credit: Wall Street Journal

Google has released a new Android and iOS application called PhotoScan that works as an extension to Google Photos’ capabilities. PhotoScan allows you to digitize old printed photographs without the glare or shadows that were so difficult to avoid when attempting to photograph a photo. The app combines four exposures of the photograph into a single, clean image. Then, you can bring the image into Google Photos and store and edit it to your liking.

Source: Wired

Instagramming Stacks Around the World

 

Image Credit: Olivier Martel Savoie

Image Credit: Olivier Martel Savoie

A new Instagram series, #olive_libraries, celebrates the unique architecture of libraries. Using only his iPhone, photographer Olivier Martel Savoie has travelled to document libraries all over the world. From the glass-walled stacks of sleek modern libraries to the intricately carved reading rooms of historic libraries, Savoie’s photographs reflect the importance of libraries as community spaces. Follow him on Instagram at @une_olive.

Source: Archdaily

Visit Exhibitions from the Past with MoMA’s New Archive

Image Credit: MoMA

Image Credit: MoMA

The Museum of Modern Art has released a digital image archive that contains images of exhibitions from the museum’s opening in 1929 to today. Featuring more than 33,000 photographs, press releases, catalogues, and more, the archive is free-of-charge to use and provides an in-depth look at the MoMA’s rich history. This archive provides context that will allow for a deeper understanding of the place of modern art in our society. Search the collection on MoMA’s website here.

Source: ArtForum

 

Columbia University Releases 10,000 Architectural Images

Columbia University’s Graduate School of Architecture, Preservation, and Planning and the Avery Architectural and Fine Arts Library have released 10,000 architectural sections, plans, and related imagery through online image database Artstor. The collection is based on the GSAPP’s History of Modern Architecture class, with projects ranging from 1871 to 2013. The primary focus of the collection is 20th century architecture, including projects from Le Corbusier, Walter Gropius, Adolf Loos, Zaha Hadid and Rem Koolhaas. Sketches, posters, and photographs are represented in the collection in addition to sections and plans. View the collection at Artstor here.

Source: Artstor Blog

A Photographic Essay of New Belgrade’s Communist Architecture

Image Credit: Piotr Bednarki

Image Credit: Piotr Bednarki

Architectural photographer Piotr Bednarski explains that New Belgrade is unique in comparison to his hometown of Warsaw, which does not have many untouched residential constructions from the Communist Era. One of the Serbian capital city’s municipalities, New Belgrade exemplifies the stark contrast between the densely-packed built areas and the flat open areas that were typical of communist design. See Bednarkski’s images here.

Source: ArchDaily

The Getty Research Portal: A Digitized Art Historical Goldmine

Image Credit: The Iris

Image Credit: The Iris

The Getty Research Portal, a free, online database that grants the public access to digitized art historical texts, now exceeds 100,000 volumes. In addition to plentiful research resources, the portal has also reconfigured its searching capabilities to allow for improved ease of use. It has also recently incorporated new contributions from major libraries, including the Menil Collection Library in Houston.

Source: The Iris: Behind the Scenes at the Getty

Flea Market Montage

Screen Shot 2016-02-22 at 1.13.04 PM

Spanning time and place, artist J. Frede creates new landscapes utilizing discarded photographs found at thrift stores and flea markets by juxtaposing lines from one image into the next. The completed montages are framed to show their wayward edges but still unify the images into a singular composition. Of the body of work, entitled Fiction Landscapes, Frede says “Arranging these into new landscapes that never existed speaks to the stitching together of human behavior and how we relate to time and the past: How many people have stopped at that rest stop and taken nearly the same photo of the plain hillside? All locking their own associations into the view, first road trip with a new love; last road trip to see grandma; one of many road trips alone.

Source: Visual News