“Breathing” Pillow Lulls Users to Sleep

Image Credit: Somnox

Image Credit: Somnox

Dutch design team TU Delft has created a pillow that soothes users to sleep with the slow, rhythmic sound of breathing. The pillow, dubbed Somnox, has embedded sensors to determine whether the user is awake or asleep. The data is then used to alter the breathing pattern of the pillow in order to stimulate calm breathing in the user. In addition to helping users sleep, the pillow gently wakes users up with a gradually increasing light that simulates the sunrise.

Source: Dezeen

Hollywood Takes on Mies van der Rohe’s Farnsworth House

Image credit: Archdaily

Image credit: Archdaily

The tale of Mies van der Rohe’s Farnsworth House will soon become a major feature film. The movie, starring Jeff Bridges as Mies and Maggie Gyllenhaal as Dr. Edith Farnsworth, chronicles the now-debunked tale of the passionate and ill-fated client-architect relationship. No further details have been released about the film, but the pairing of romance and architecture is sure to draw fans from all over.

Source: Archdaily

Study Shows Architecture Majors Work the Hardest in College

Image Credit: Beraldo Leal

Image Credit: Beraldo Leal

A new study conducted by Indiana University’s National Study of Student Engagement claims that architecture majors spend more time out of the classroom studying or working on projects than any other major. Coming in at a whopping 22.2 hours of additional work a week compared to a communications major’s 12.18 hours a week or an engineering student’s 19.66 hours a week, architecture majors seem to live in their studios more than they live in their dorms. How many hours a week do you spend in the studio?

Source: Archinect

Valentine’s Day Cards for Architecture Nerds

Image credit: Bob Rattray

Image credit: Bob Rattray

What happens when you combine a profession terrified of kitsch with the cheesiest tradition of all? Archdaily answers the question for us with “105 Valentines for Architects and Architecture Lovers.” The cards range from architecture-related puns to building forms in the shape of hearts. There’s no better way to express your love for trusses, Autodesk, and Loos than with these fun Valentines.

Source: ArchDaily

Scenic Springfield

Image credit: Scenic Simpsons

Image credit: Scenic Simpsons

While some may cite “The Simpsons” as one of America’s most well-loved cultural exports, few would recognize the series as something that could be considered visually beautiful. The Instagram account Scenic Simpsons proves that striking composition is something that we can add to our list of reasons to love the show. Scenic Simpsons is dedicated to “showcasing the most beautiful scenes, colors, sets and abstract compositions from Springfield.” View some of the stills captured by Scenic Simpsons here.

Source: ArchDaily

Table Suspends 50,000 Year Old Wood in Resin

Source: Riva 1920

Image Credit: Riva 1920

The Riva 1920 ‘earth’ table, designed by the Italian furniture company in 1920, floats 50,000 year old kauri wood in resin to give the illusion that the wood is suspended in space. The table’s name comes from the continent-like forms created by the kauri wood; viewed from above, the table looks like an abstract version of earth. Light hits the wood and resin to form unique shadows underneath the table, altering space as the light source shifts.

Source: DesignBoom

Practice DSLR Photography With this Interactive Website

Image Credit: Simon Roberts

Image Credit: Simon Roberts

Is your DSLR a mystery to you? Photography-Mapped, an interactive website by designer Simon Roberts, illustrates how the parts of a DSLR camera move together to form an image. By manipulating the controls on the website, users can test out their knowledge of aperture, shutter speed, light, and ISO. When the controls have been set, users press the “take photo” button to check whether or not their exposure is satisfactory. The simple graphic on the site allows new photographers to understand the basic mechanics of their camera.

Source: Visual News

Surreal Animation Explores Piranesi’s Etchings

Image Credit: Gregoire Dupond

Image Credit: Gregoire Dupond

Italian artist Grégoire Dupond’s has stitched together sixteen Piranesi etchings in a dynamic animation. The eleven minute long video projects Piranesi’s etchings on a three-dimensional plane, taking the viewer on a trip through the fictional prisons in the “Carceri” series. The original prints, first published in 1750, portray a fictional labyrinth prison that evoke a dream world created in Piranesi’s mind. The animation presents the surreal etchings in a startlingly realistic light; as the video progresses, the viewer feels as though they are a visitor in Piranesi’s world.

Source: Gregoire Dupond

Ikea Wins Design Award for Refugee Shelter

Image Credit: The Design Museum

Image Credit: The Design Museum

The Design Museum of London has awarded the 2016 Beazley Design of the Year award to Ikea for its flat-packed “Better Shelter.” The refugee shelter features a solar-powered wall and can be assembled in four hours. Currently, over 30,000 of these shelters are in use all over the world, offering privacy and comfort to those displaced by conflicts and disasters. The “Better Shelter” can be dismantled and reassembled in a few hours, making it a practical solution for those seeking temporary housing.

Source: Curbed

Open-Source Tool Makes Comparing Street Networks Easy

Image Credit: Geoff Boeing

Image Credit: Geoff Boeing

Geoff Boeing, a PhD student at UC Berkeley, has created an open-source tool that allows researchers to directly compare city street networks. The Python-based tool generates black-and-white maps that visualize one square mile of a street network for a given city. The simple visual language of the tool’s renderings emphasizes the stark contrast between wide suburban blocks, tight 19th century grids, and radial ancient cities.

Source: NextCity

Put a Bird on It

A Portland police officer looked out his window one evening to the sight of thousands of black starlings settled on the tops of snow-covered trees. Walker Berg, the C.S.I. who noticed the birds, quickly grabbed his DSLR to photograph the stunning site. The police department named the image Crows on Snow and posted it to social media.

Source: This is Colossal

Austin Artist Commissioned for Dell Medical School Exhibit

Image Credit: Paul Bardagjy

Image Credit: Paul Bardagjy

O N E E V E R Y O N E, a new photographic series by artist Ann Hamilton commission by Landmarks, will adorn the halls of the Dell Medical School in Austin. O N E E V E R Y O N E explores the relationship between human touch and caring, using frosted plastic to obscure parts of the subject that aren’t directly touching the material. More than 530 Austin-area participants were photographed for the project, which opens on January 26. Opening celebrations run from January 26-28.

Source: University of Texas Landmarks