CFP: Multiculturalism and Language Contact (Tetovo, Macedonia)

Deadline for Submissions: May 15, 2017

CALL FOR PAPERS
MULTICULTURALISM AND LANGUAGE CONTACT:
An International Scholarly Conference organized by
the Max van der Stoel Institute at South East European University &
the Research Center for Areal Linguistics at the Macedonian Academy of Arts & Sciences

Balkan peoples in the course of centuries of living in a multicultural and multilingual
environment have attempted to interpret the world around them in a common fashion while at the same time preserving a variety of distinctive features, such as language and dialect. Significant cultural interactions, especially during the attested period of the Balkan Linguistic League, have brought about the convergence of inherited linguistic structures in the respective Balkan languages combined with varieties of common lexical elements, all conducive to more effective communication among the peoples involved.

At a time when some political actors are seeking to convince various publics that “they have nothing a common” (a phrase deployed stridently during the Yugoslav Wars of Succession), this conference seeks to bring new perspectives to the roles of multiculturalism and language contact as vital factors in mutual understanding and a shared worldview, a topic that is both timely and in need of deeper scholarly engagement. Papers dealing with the peoples and languages of the Balkans (as well as Balkan peoples and languages living beyond the Balkans) are especially welcome, but any paper relevant to the main themes of the conference is eligible to be submitted for consideration (see below). Continue reading “CFP: Multiculturalism and Language Contact (Tetovo, Macedonia)”

CFP: Revolutionary Centenary Workshop (UC Berkeley)

Deadline for Applications: May 15, 2017

UC BERKELEY REVOLUTIONARY CENTENARY WORKSHOP
CALL FOR PAPERS

100 Years Later: The Russian Revolution and its Consequences
October 6-7, 2017
www.berkeley1917.wordpress.com

“The Soviet socialist revolution was the great utopian adventure of the modern age,” wrote the late Berkeley professor Martin Malia in the opening to his 1994 book The Soviet Tragedy. Utopian and pragmatic, top-down and bottom-up, tragic and fortunate: historians have affixed many adjectives to the year 1917 to describe it and its impact on Russia, the former Soviet Union, and the wider world. Long before the opening of the Russian archives in the early nineties, scholars have spilled much ink to debate the Revolution’s origins and causes, goals and shortcomings, beginning and end. Nearly all historians agree that the Revolution stands virtually unrivaled in its ambition, influence, and global legacy.

To mark the Revolution’s centenary, the University of California, Berkeley will host a workshop where graduate students in the dissertation writing phase can present and receive feedback on work that relates to the theme of the Russian Revolution and its consequences, broadly defined. How did the ideas, actors, and events that undergirded the Bolshevik program reverberate across the Soviet Union and beyond? In what ways did Soviet socialism serve as a model for non-Soviet governments, revolutionaries, reformers, and other elites to follow, reject, or improve upon? What effect did the collapse have on socialist and non-socialist governments, and what role does memory of the Soviet past play in the former USSR and beyond today? We welcome chronological diversity (from 1917 to the present), regional variation (Russia and the Soviet republics, Eastern Europe, Africa, Latin America, North America and Asia), and thematic range (political, social, economic, environmental, scientific, intellectual, etc.). Our goal is to bring together young scholars from universities across the United States whose work is adding to and changing the way we think, research, and write about the world that 1917 forged.  Continue reading “CFP: Revolutionary Centenary Workshop (UC Berkeley)”

CFP: Socio-political Landslides, Cultural Ruptures and Literary History in Eastern Europe (Ghent Univ.)

Deadline for Submission: April 1, 2017

CALL FOR PAPERS
Accelerated development? Socio-political landslides, cultural ruptures and literary history in Eastern Europe (Ghent University, Ghent, September 29 – October 1, 2017)

In 1964 the Bulgarian-Belarusian-Russian scholar Georgii Gachev coined the term ‘uskorennoe razvitie’ or ‘accelerated development’ in his 1964 monograph Accelerated Development of Literature: On the Basis of the Bulgarian Literature of the First Half of the 19th Century.  The term describes what happened to Bulgarian literature during Ottoman rule. Being a ‘young’ and ‘peripheral’ literature, having started to develop only recently at the time, Bulgarian literature ‘had to’ go through the whole evolution of European literature at a high pace in order to catch up with the latter. One of the side effects of this accelerated development was that characteristics of different style periods could even co-occur. Gachev’s thought-provoking idea has never really received a lot of attention, except in Bulgarian studies, where the concept was elaborated, criticized and / or gave way to new theories (Petar Dinekov, Nikolai Genchev, Roumen Daskalov, Alexander Kiossev …), but mostly with regard to the development of Bulgarian culture and society.

Today Gachev’s theory seems outdated, not in the least for its centralist assumptions – i.e. taking for granted that central cultures take the lead and peripheral cultures follow suit – that form the very basis of the Eurocentric theory. Nonetheless, the potential of the very kernel of the concept is obvious – both for dealing with the literary histories of other ‘young’ and/or ‘peripheral’ literatures in different time periods and for challenging the different notions that form the basis of Gachev’s theory – ‘peripheral’, ‘young’, ‘Western’, ‘dominant’, ‘oppression’, ‘conservatism’. ‘Accelerated development’ may be a suitable term to describe how Western literary critics in the 19th century thought about the quickly evolving, ‘peripheral’ Russian literature of the time. ‘Accelerated development’ may also be applied to the evolution of (certain) Modernist movements in the ‘peripheral’ Eastern Europe. And what to say about the apparent fast-forward evolution of the East-European literatures after the collapse of Communism, quickly adapting Postmodernism, Magical Realism, and other literary trends that other, ‘central’ literatures had been going through earlier?

This conference aims to explore – i.e., to corroborate, to challenge or to further develop – the concept of accelerated development by looking at concrete cases in the literary histories of Eastern Europe where one can speak of a major rupture, such as suddenly acquired cultural independence or freedom or technological evolution, that causes the literature to change course and, possibly, to ‘accelerate’. More specifically, this conference hopes to find new ways to look at the complex relationships between dominant and non- or less-dominant, central and peripheral, old and young literatures and cultures, colonizing and colonized cultures, progressive and conservative cultures, open and oppressive / repressive cultures, etc. Additionally, the conference aims to discuss the (catalytic) role of cultural agents in the process of accelerated development and the tension(s) between literary and extra-literary motivations. Lastly, the conference hopes to shed light on how cultures going through an accelerated development look at their earlier selves and whether, and if so, how accelerated developments may also lead to new, ‘own’ literary forms that are not quite related to the seemingly dominant cultures.

The keynote speakers include Raymond Detrez (Belgium), Galin Tihanov (UK) and Willem G. Weststeijn (The Netherlands).

The conference will take place at Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium, on September 29 – October 1, 2017. Please send your abstract of approximately 400 words together with your short CV (no more than one page) to the conference organizers. The deadline for proposals is April 1, 2017. Notification of acceptance of proposals will be provided by May, 2017. Queries and proposals should be sent to the conference organizers.

Ben Dhooge (Ben.Dhooge@UGent.be), Michel De Dobbeleer (Michel.DeDobbeleer@UGent.be), Miglena Dikova-Milanova (Miglena.DikovaMilanova@UGent.be) & Dennis Ioffe (Dennis.Ioffe@UGent.be) Department of Languages and cultures, Section of Slavic and East European Studies Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium
http://www.slavistiek.ugent.be/Accelerateddevelopment

CFP: Genealogies of Diversity (7th International Summer Academy)

Deadline for Submission: March 15, 2017
Deadline: March 30, 2017

7th International Summer Academy at the ZfL 2017

Genealogies of Diversity. Contexts and Figurations of a Controversial Concept.

The upcoming ZfL Summer Academy will discuss the question of diversity from the perspective of literary and cultural studies. Our focus will be on the history of the discourse on diversity – it’s genealogy in respect to different theoretical and cultural contexts and its relation to similar concepts like hybridity or multiplicity. Of great interest are furthermore rhetoric strategies and aesthetic forms, which represent or call for diversity. We invite doctoral students and post-docs in the fields of humanities, social sciences, and philosophy to apply.

Complete call see under the following link:

http://www.zfl-berlin.org/event/genealogies-of-diversity-contexts-and-figurations-of-a-controversial-concept.html

Venue: Zentrum für Literatur- und Kulturforschung, Schützenstr. 18, 10117 Berlin

Organisers: Eva Axer, Matthias Schwartz, Georg Toepfer, Daniel Weidner

Keynotes: Emily Apter (New York), Stefan Hirschauer (Mainz)

Participants: Doctoral students and post-docs (we particularly encourage applications from applicants from the USA, Eastern Europe and Israel)

Number of Participants: ca. 12 participants

Languages: German and English. Prerequisites are good listening comprehension and excellent reading ability, as the source texts will be read in the original; doctoral students are welcome to present their projects in English. Continue reading “CFP: Genealogies of Diversity (7th International Summer Academy)”

CFP: A Century of Movement: Russian Culture and Global Community Since 1917 (U. of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)

Deadline for Submissions: April 7, 2017

A Century of Movement: 
Russian Culture and Global Community Since 1917
CFP Deadline: April 7, 2017
October 12-13, 2017
http://centuryofmovement.unc.edu
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Keynote Speakers: Katerina Clark and Marina Frolova-Walker
Conference Organizers: Jamie Blake and Grace Kweon, in collaboration with Annegret Fauser

The cultural products of the last century reflect change, opportunity, and uncertainty, and demonstrate active negotiations between personal identity and social awareness, nationalism and cosmopolitanism, artistic voice and security. This conference, in the centennial year of the Revolution, seeks to explore the transformations set in motion during and after the events of 1917 through an examination of cultural production and practices, located both within and without Russia.

We will explore first and foremost the issue of human migration, particularly the patterns and developments set in motion by the Revolution. In light of today’s desperate discussions regarding the migration of refugees, it is both timely and important that we examine the ways in which human migration yielded and continues to yield both social and cultural challenges and profound creative contributions.

We invite proposals of no more than 300 words for individual twenty-minute papers. Scholars and graduate students of all areas are encouraged to apply, as we hope to assemble a conference which promotes interdisciplinary discussion, with an eye towards the possibility of future publication in a volume of collected essays or a special issue of a journal.

Please visit the conference website for more information: http://centuryofmovement.unc.edu

Proposals should include presenter name, contact information, institutional affiliation (if any) and a short biographical note (not to exceed 100 words).  Please send proposals to centuryofmovement-at-gmail.com. The deadline for submission is April 7, 2017.

CFP: Tolstoy Volume (Critical Insights)

Deadline for Submissions: April 1, 2017

Critical Insights is a multi-volume series that offers original introductory criticism on key authors, works, and themes in literature that are addressed in core reading lists at the undergraduate level. The quality of scholarship and the level of analysis for this series are designed to provide the best and most well rounded overviews of the authors, works, and themes covered. Each volume is peer-edited by a scholar in the field. The result is a collection of authoritative, in-depth scholarship suitable for students and teachers alike. All chapters are written as original material and include an MLA-styled “Works Cited” section and bibliography. Published and distributed by Salem Press, new volumes in the series are solicited and edited by Grey House Publishing. The publisher owns the copyright of all submissions to its volumes.

The editor of a new Critical Insights volume on Leo Tolstoy seeks contributors to write chapters on any topic or text. Submissions on recent film and television adaptations of Tolstoy’s work, Tolstoy’s less commonly known works, Tolstoyan philosophy, and on narrative technique and authorial intent are especially of interest. Papers should be accessible to a general audience.

Final drafts of chapters of approximately 4,000-5,000 words will be due on or around August 1, 2017.

Contributors will be compensated upon the submission of completed chapters.

To contribute, please send a proposed title and a short abstract (250 words or less) of the proposed chapter and with a short bio (150 words) by April 1, 2017 off-list to Rachel Stauffer at rachelstauffer@gmail.com. Please also feel free to send any questions.

CFP: History, Memory, Politics: The Russian Revolution 100 Years On (Scando-Slavica)

Deadline for Submission: March 1, 2017

Call for papers for a special issue of Scando-Slavica dedicated to:

History, Memory, Politics: The Russian Revolution 100 Years On

2017 marks the 100th anniversary of the Russian Revolution, or the “Great October Revolution” as it was called in the Soviet Union. Back then, there was no doubt that the Revolution was truly “great.” But in the 25 years that have passed since the dissolution of the Soviet Union, the meaning of the Revolution has become highly contested.

The lack of consensus regarding the meaning and significance of the Revolution represents a challenge to the goal of current Russian politics of memory. At present, Russia is ruled by a regime that emphasises the longue durée of Russian history, in order to foster patriotism by means of a positive, coherent and uncontested understanding of the past. Unified textbooks in history have been singled out as particularly important in creating this patriotism. The current regime aims at overall consensus and unity both in terms of a shared understanding of the past and as a characteristic of Russia in the past. Symptomatically, while Vladimir Putin did mention the 1917 Revolution in his annual address to the parliament in December 2016, he provided no clear conclusion on how to understand it, but chose instead to emphasise that in spite of our difficult past “we are one people.”

In post-Soviet Russia, the celebration of the Revolution has been replaced by the celebration of the end of the early seventeenth-century Time of Troubles. What makes a celebration of the Revolution particularly difficult in today’s Russia is that its current regime fears revolutions more than anything else, suffice it to mention the “Colour Revolutions” in the “Near Abroad” or the Arabic Spring. At the same time, the regime legitimises its politics with reference to history, by claiming that it sustains Russia’s “thousand-year-old history.” Although the Revolution inevitably challenges the hegemonic quest for consensus, it is nevertheless a historical fact that cannot be passed over in silence. Thus, the question is where the revolutionary moment of 1917 – an event that we have been accustomed to think of in terms of rupture – fits in today? Was it in the long run merely a superficial event? Was it the expression of a revolutionary chaos that had to be overcome? Or was it itself the beginning of a recovery of the Russian state and its empire from war chaos and dissolution? How are the revolutionary events of 1917 framed in different contexts and by different voices in the contemporary public and academic debates?

This special issue invites scholars to analyse how the 1917 Russian Revolution is understood and discussed in today’s Russia. We welcome creative and theoretically reflective analyses of an engaging empirical material. We are interested in both how the anniversary itself is celebrated (or not), and in the ways in which talking about the Revolution have developed since 2000. Possible fields and topics to discuss include (but are not limited to):

  • The Revolution in light of the current regime’s instrumentalisation of history
  • The Revolution in the Russian public debate – among the opposition as well as the supporters of the regime
  • The Revolution in Russian cultural policy, education and textbooks
  • The Revolution and contemporary politics of memory
  • The Revolution in contemporary Russian literature
  • The Revolution and the Russian Orthodox Church
  • Prevailing attitudes to the Revolution in today’s Russia: rupture or transition? Resource or threat to stability?
  • Discrepancies between public and scholarly debates on the Revolution

The editors of this special issue will in the first run make a selection of articles for peer review on the basis of submitted abstracts. A final decision on which articles to include will be made after the double blind peer-review process. The special issue of Scando-Slavica will be published as volume 64 (1), 2018. Scando-Slavica is published by Routledge (Taylor & Francis Group), and is indexed in Scopus, ESCI and ERIH PLUS. Contributions may be submitted in English or Russian.

Timeline

  • Deadline for abstract proposals (300 words): 1 March 2017. Please submit to the guest editorskare.mjor@ucrs.uu.se and ingunn.lunde@if.uib.no.
  • Notification of acceptance of abstracts: 20 March 2017
  • Deadline for completed article drafts for peer-review (40 000 characters incl. spaces): 15 July 2017
  • Peer-reviewing/revisions: August–November 2017
  • Final decisions and acceptance: November 2017

Guest Editors

  • Kåre Johan Mjør, Researcher of Russian Intellectual History, Uppsala Centre for Russian and Eurasian Studies, kare.mjor@ucrs.uu.se
  • Ingunn Lunde, Professor of Russian, University of Bergen, ingunn.lunde@if.uib.no

 

CFP: Ideology and Linguistic Ideas – History of Linguistic Ideas (Tbilisi State University)

Abstract Deadline: July 15, 2017

Meeting Description:

We are pleased to invite scholars interested in the history of linguistic
ideas developed alongside with different ideologies in different times. The
first conference on this theme was organized in 2015.

2017 year will be the 100th anniversary of the Great October Socialist
Revolution, which changed the development of peoples of Former Russian Empire.
The new linguistic politics of Soviet Union and so called ”New Linguistic
Theory” were the consequence of this revolution. Due to this reason some
sessions of the conference will be dedicated to the problems of the history of
Soviet Linguistics and the Soviet Linguistic Politics.

The Conference is organized by the Giorgi Akhvlediani Society for the History
of Linguistics and Ivané Javakhishvili Tbilisi State University.

The conference will be held on 6-9 October, 2017 at Ivane Javakhishvili
Tbilisi State University (Tbilisi, Georgia).

Call for Papers:

Papers relating to any aspect of the history of linguistic ideas developed
alongside with ideologies are invited, focusing on diverse topic areas from
individual case studies to methodological considerations.

Proposals for papers should be submitted in the form of abstracts of 400 words
as Word.doc, accompanied by the affiliation, email address and short bio of
the participant and mailed to: gashol.ge@gmail.com

The official languages of the conference are Georgian and English.

The deadline for submission of abstracts is July 15, 2017. The conference
editorial board will select the papers to be presented at the conference.
Final selection will be made by July 25, 2017; notification of acceptance will
be sent before July 30, 2017.

For further information please contact the local members of the executive
board by using gashol.ge@gmail.com

Continue reading “CFP: Ideology and Linguistic Ideas – History of Linguistic Ideas (Tbilisi State University)”

CFP: Conference “Privacy Outside Its ‘Comfort Zone’: Late Socialist Eastern and East-Central Europe between the Private and the Public” (Univ. of Passau)

Deadline for Submissions: February 28, 2017

CfP Conference “Privacy Outside Its ‘Comfort Zone’: Late Socialist Eastern and East-Central Europe between the Private and the Public”

“Privacy” is a well-researched yet highly disputed concept in Western scholarship. While most privacy research comes from and concentrates on Western liberal societies, great potential of privacy studies beyond this traditional framework still remains largely unexplored. The framework of Western liberal societies may therefore be seen not only as a “comfort zone” of privacy studies, but also as a barrier that often limits the potential of the research. This conference aims at elucidating the problems and the perspectives of privacy studies beyond the traditional liberal framework by bringing together scholars and PhD students who work on the concept of “privacy” in the context of Late Socialist Eastern and East-Central Europe.
A common challenge to privacy researchers of non-Western societies, especially if they come from such a society, is to refute the erroneous misconception of the absence of “privacy” in non-liberal societies, and to embrace the constructions of “privacy” that these local societies offer. This conference endeavors to create a dialogue between scholars and PhD students from all fields of humanities and social and political sciences to discuss the challenges of transgressing the borders of liberal frameworks, the strategies to cope with these challenges, and the perspectives for privacy research that such transgressions offer.
The use of this concept in the context of Late Socialist Eastern and East-Central Europe leads to a range of questions that challenge liberal dichotomies and pave the way for alternative visions of “privacy”. These questions are particularly resonant now, in the centennial year of the October Revolution, when its consequences are debated anew. While the liberal concept of “privacy” usually fails in the framework of authoritarian regimes of post-war Europe, the region offers a diversity of other impulses similar to the liberal idea of “privacy”. In the post-war years, Socialist Eastern and East-Central Europe witnessed the expansion of the material as well as immaterial private sphere, which did not only come as a result of the changed world order and subsequent transformations of Socialist societies, but can also be seen as a process that was meticulously planned, carried out, and controlled by the authorities of respective countries in an attempt to stabilize their regimes in the process of de-Stalinization. However, we should also consider whether the private sphere, so benevolently tolerated by Socialist states, continuously developed into an enfant terrible that nurtured not only stability, but also the disruptive forces of dissidence and civil rights movements, which ultimately undermined the Socialist bloc from within. These stabilizing and simultaneously disruptive currents of “privacy” within non-liberal societies are of particular interest, as they elucidate the multifaceted nature of this concept.
Participants are therefore asked to revisit and question the concept of “privacy” in liberal contexts as well as within the frameworks of Late Socialist Eastern and East-Central Europe by renegotiating the underlying categories within a certain society. The conference will specifically examine ways of addressing the concepts of “privacy” and “publicity” in said contexts by debating the applicable frameworks and by challenging existing approaches. It will further explore the potential of “reverse applicability” by discussing how privacy research in liberal contexts can benefit from other frameworks of privacy—the transfer that is of particular interest now, in the “post-privacy age”, when Snowden’s revelations elucidated the approximations of Western liberal states to the authoritarian models of the past and the present. In the light of such developments, the examination of Late Socialist authoritarian societies becomes advantageous for our understanding of contemporary privacy paradigms.

Continue reading “CFP: Conference “Privacy Outside Its ‘Comfort Zone’: Late Socialist Eastern and East-Central Europe between the Private and the Public” (Univ. of Passau)”

CFP: XXII International Conference “Slavic Readings” (Daugavpils U.)

Deadline for Submissions: March 01, 2017

The Department of Russian and Slavic Linguistics of Daugavpils University is pleased to announce the XXII International Conference „Slavic Readings” to be held at DU, Daugavpils (Latvia), on May 18-19, 2017.

The conference welcomes presentations of research done on contemporary issues of Russian and Slavic studies, and functioning of the Russian language, literature and culture in a foreign language environment.
The Conference will work in the following sections:

1. Contemporary issues of Russian and Slavic studies (a theoretical aspect):
– Slavic languages: historical and contemporary context.
– Literature of the Slavs: historical and contemporary context.
– Slavic-Baltic language, literature and culture connections.
– Russian literature within the world literature context.

2. Russian language, literature and culture in a foreign language environment (a pragmatic aspect).
– Studying Russian literature and culture in the modern world.
– Russian language in a multicultural environment.
– Innovative methods of teaching Russian as a foreign language. Continue reading “CFP: XXII International Conference “Slavic Readings” (Daugavpils U.)”