Tag Archives: December 2017

CFP: Graduate Conference: “The End of the World: Tragedy | Catastrophe | Apocalypse.” (Indiana U.)

Deadline for Submissions: December 15, 2017

Call For Papers:
Student Advisory Board for the Department of Comparative Literature
Indiana University Bloomington
Graduate Conference
March 2-3, 2018 

The End of the World:
Tragedy | Catastrophe | Apocalypse

“The probability of global catastrophe is very high, and the actions
needed to reduce the risks of disaster must be taken very soon.”
The Bulletin of Atomic Scientists

In January 2017, the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists moved the hands of the Doomsday Clock to two and a half minutes before midnight, signalling that we are the closest we have ever been to destroying our world. Speculation about the end of the world has been a part of human thought, art, and culture since the beginning of recorded history, from the Epic of Gilgamesh to today’s Twitter feed. Mass violence, war, institutional violence, economic collapse, disease, and despair define our current media landscape. More and more, catastrophe is refigured in terms of individual narratives, while personal tragedy is reimagined on a global scale.

This conference aims to explore manifold representations of the end of the world across time and space. What is a “world”? What does it mean for one to be created or destroyed? Where is the line between tragedy and catastrophe? When does a catastrophe become an apocalypse? When does suffering become world-ending? How do these distinctions blur the lines between the private and the public, the personal and the global? How do such considerations change throughout history and across cultures? What does it mean to be “post”-apocalyptic? How are questions like these impacted by apocalypse as an unveiling? Are all unveilings necessarily catastrophic? Why has modern popular culture adopted the term as a catch all for major, mass destruction?

We encourage interdisciplinary and global approaches to the field of Comparative Literature. We welcome proposals from any branch of the humanities including, but not limited to, Literary Studies, Film and Media Studies, Gender and Sexuality Studies, History and Historiography, Postcolonial Studies, Eco-Criticism, Folklore, Religious Studies, Medieval Studies, Classics, and Art History.

Please send an abstract (maximum 300 words), a title for your presentation, and a short bio (maximum 50 words) including your name, email address, degree level and institutional affiliation to: CMLTSAB@indiana.edu by December 15, 2017. Please submit all materials both as an attachment and as text in the body of your email. Final decisions will be made no later than mid-January.

CFP: REE Jewish Cultures Jr. Scholar Workshop (U. of Illinois)

Deadline for Submissions: December 15, 2017

The Program in Jewish Culture and Society at the University of Illinois invites submissions for the Russian and East European Jewish Cultures Junior Scholar Workshop, to be held in Champaign, Illinois, on May 21 and May 22, 2018. The workshop is open to advanced graduate students and early career scholars (in their first three years after the PhD). Abstracts and papers should highlight the critical methodologies used in the work. Selected papers will be pre-circulated among the participants, to maximize opportunity for discussion. Participants will also have an opportunity to meet with the Slavic Reference Service.

To be considered, please send your 400 word abstract and CV by December 15, 2017, to eavrutin@illinois.edu and hlmurav@illinois.edu. We will then inform participants who have been selected and ask you to develop a paper of no more than 8,000 words (excluding notes). The workshop will pay for participants’ hotel expenses and meals. Modest travel subsidies may be available, if participants are not able to obtain funds from their home universities.

Study Abroad: Learn Russian in the EU (Daugavplis U.)

Deadline for Applications: December 01, 2017

Daugavpils University and the “Learn Russian in the European Union” project are accepting applications for customized academic semester abroad programs specifically designed for international students, hosted at Daugavpils University, Latvia:
– Russian Language, Literature and Culture;
– Russian Language and East European Studies;
– Russian Language and Political Science;
– Russian Language and Natural Sciences (mathematics, physics, biology, chemistry, and environmental studies), theory and laboratory practice (in English/Russian).

The application deadline for the Spring’2018 programs is December 1, 2017.

No visa is required to study in Latvia for citizens of the USA, Canada, the European Union, and many other countries.

Daugavpils University awards up to 30 ECTS credits – the equivalent of 15 US university credits.

For full details, please visit http://www.learnrussianineu.com/semester-abroad-programs.

All the semester programs include two components:
– Intensive Russian as a Foreign Language core course, taught according to different target proficiency levels.
– Subject matter group and elective courses, depending on the selected program: in Russian language, literature, and culture, or in East European studies, Baltic studies, history, physics, biology, math, environmental sciences, and other disciplines. Continue reading

CFP: Resistance and Collaboration in Occupied Europe (Yale U.)

Deadline for application: December 15, 2017

Resistance and Collaboration in Occupied Europe, an interdisciplinary graduate student conference sponsored by the Memory Studies in Modern Europe Working Group at Yale University, Monday April 2nd, 2018. Keynote speakers: Marci Shore and Timothy Snyder (Yale University)

The Yale University Memory Studies in Modern Europe working group invites doctoral students from all disciplines to share their research in a conference devoted to the topics of resistance and collaboration in Europe in the long twentieth century. While the title of the conference was conceived with the Nazi occupation in mind, presentation proposals addressing other instances of resistance and collaboration are welcome as well. The conference will offer a forum to discuss methodology and work in progress as well as to connect with fellow scholars at various stages of research. Selected participants will have 20 minutes to present their paper, followed by a 10-minute discussion with the audience.

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Internship: Alfa Bank (Moscow)

Deadline for applications: December 1, 2017

The Alfa Fellowship Program was founded in 2004 with the goal of fostering a community of emerging leaders who have first-hand experience in the business, public policy, and cultural environments of Russia and the region. Since then, over 150 Americans, Britons, and Germans have been able to work, live, and travel in Russia through this unique professional opportunity. The program is funded by Alfa-Bank, and is administered in the U.S., U.K., and Germany by Cultural Vistas and in Moscow by the Fund for International Fellowships and Cultural Dialogue.

Alfa fellows have a demonstrated interest in Russian and European/Eurasian affairs, exceptional academic and professional credentials, proven personal initiative, and clear goals and expectations for their professional assignments. Fellows are between the ages of 25 and 35 with graduate degrees and professional experience in business, economics, journalism, law, public policy, or related fields. Fellows possess leadership potential and are active in community or public service. While Russian language skills vary, most successful applicants have studied Russian for at least two years at the postsecondary level.

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Graduate Program: Slavic Literature and Culture (U of Illinois)

Deadline for applications: December 31, 2017

The Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures at the University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign invites students interested in pursuing a Ph.D. in Slavic literatures and cultures to apply to the graduate program. Qualified students beginning their graduate career at Illinois are guaranteed five years of financial support (contingent on satisfactory progress), including fellowships, teaching, research, and graduate assistantships, summer support, and the opportunity for an editorial assistantship at Slavic Review. We also welcome applicants who have completed an M.A. in Slavic Languages and Literature or related fields.
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Academic Job: Mahindra Humanities Center Postdoc Fellowships (Harvard U.)

Deadline for Applications: December 01, 2017

The Mahindra Humanities Center invites applications for one-year postdoctoral fellowships in connection with the Center’s Andrew W. Mellon Foundation seminar on the topic of migration and the humanities.

Migration plays as critical a role in the moral imagination of the humanities as it does in shaping the activist vision of humanitarianism and human rights. Too often, the humanities are summoned merely as witnesses to the spectacle of the significant currents and crises of contemporary life. Literature and the arts are viewed as iconic presences whose primary aesthetic and moral values lie in their illustrative powers of empathy and evocation. Yet the intellectual formation of the humanities—their very conception of the nature of meaning, knowledge, and morals—is deeply resonant with the displacement of values and the revision of norms that shape the transitional and translational narratives of migrant lives.

Built around pedagogies of representation and interpretation—textual, visual, digital, political, ethical, ecological, etc.—the humanities engage with the history of shifting relations between cultural expression, historical transition, and political transformation. The ethics of citizenship in our time are defined as much by migration and resettlement as by indigenous belonging, as much by global governance as by national sovereignty. And the humanities play a central role in defining the terms and the territories of cultural citizenship as it creates innovative institutions and identities in the making of a civil society.

The migration “crisis” makes it imperative for humanists to reflect on the foundational concepts and values of our disciplines in addressing the representation of others as they are recognized in the norms of cultural citizenship. The issues the seminar will explore include: the ethics of hospitality; modes of cosmopolitanism; negotiation of cultural “differences” under duress; the role played by interpretation and cultural translation in enhancing processes of social integration.

Applications from scholars in all fields whose work innovatively engages with migration and the humanities are welcome. For 2018-19 proposals that engage with migration, cultural memory, and the archive are of particular interest:

How do we understand the relationship between cultural memory as personal or collective narrative and the institutional demands of the legal discourse of memory used as a protocol of evidence that establishes the migrant’s claim to refuge, asylum and/or citizenship? What is the relationship between the affective aspects of migrant memory, such as fear, anxiety, humiliation, trauma, hope, and wish fulfillment, and the truth conditions encoded in jurisprudence and political rationality?

What are the narrative forms and discursive modes that constitute archives of migration, both contemporary an historical? What are the technologies and politics of these representations? How do archives of migrations function as purveyors of information, systems of classification, conduits of dissemination that create new public knowledge?

Terms and Conditions

In addition to pursuing their own research projects, fellows will be core participants in the bi-weekly seminar meetings. Other participants will include faculty and graduate students from Harvard and other universities in the region, and occasional visiting speakers.

Fellows will be joined at the Center by postdoctoral fellows from Germany, who will be coming as part of a collaboration between the Mahindra Humanities Center and the Volkswagen Foundation. Fellows are expected to be in residence at Harvard for the term of the fellowship.

Fellows will receive stipends of $65,000, individual medical insurance, moving assistance of $1,500, and additional research support of $2,500.

Eligibility and Deadline Information

Applicants for 2018-19 fellowships must have received a doctorate or terminal degree in or after May 2015. Applicants without a doctorate or terminal degree must demonstrate that they will receive a doctorate or terminal degree in a related discipline in or before August 2018.
 Applications must be completed by December 1, 2017.

Academic Job: WIGH Fellows (Harvard U.)

Deadline for Applications: December 01, 2017

The Weatherhead Initiative on Global History (WIGH) at Harvard University identifies and supports outstanding scholars whose work responds to the growing interest in the encompassing study of global history. WIGH seeks to organize a community of scholars interested in the systematic scrutiny of developments that have unfolded across national, regional, and continental boundaries and who propose to analyze the interconnections—cultural, economic, ecological, political and demographic—among world societies. Applicants are encouraged from all over the world, and especially from outside Europe and North America, hoping to create a global conversation on global history.

WIGH Fellows are appointed for one academic year and are provided time, guidance, office space, and access to Harvard University facilities. They should be prepared to devote their entire time to productive scholarship and may undertake sustained projects of research or other original work. They will join a vibrant community of global history scholars at Harvard. The WIGH Fellowship is residential and Fellows are expected to live in the Cambridge/Boston area for the duration of their appointments unless traveling for pre-approved research purposes, and they are expected to participate in WIGH activities, including a bi-weekly seminar.

More information on the program, including events, affiliated faculty, and current and former fellows can be found at http://wigh.wcfia.harvard.edu/. Continue reading

Funding Opportunity: Career Development Grants (AAUW)

Deadline for Applications: December 15, 2017

Career Development Grants provide funding to women who hold a bachelor’s degree and are preparing to advance or change careers or reenter the workforce. Primary consideration is given to women of color and women pursuing their first advanced degree or credentials in nontraditional fields.

Applicants must be U.S. citizens or permanent residents whose last degree was received before June 30, 2013. Funds are available for tuition, fees, books, supplies, local transportation, and dependent care.

Grants provide support for course work beyond a bachelor’s degree, including a master’s degree, second bachelor’s degree, certification program, or specialized training in technical or professional fields. Course work must be taken at an accredited two- or four-year college or university in the United States or at a technical school that is fully licensed or accredited by the U.S. Department of Education. Funds are not available for doctorate-level work.

For more information, and to apply, click here.

Academic Job: Interdisciplinary Postdoc Program (Washington U. in St. Louis)

Deadline for Applications: December 04, 2017

Recent Ph.D.s, D.Phil.s, or D.F.As (in hand by June 30, 2018, and, no earlier than June 30, 2013) are invited to apply. In September 2018, the newly selected Fellow will join the University’s ongoing interdisciplinary programs and seminars. The Fellow will receive a two-year appointment with a nine-month academic year salary. Postdoctoral Fellows pursue their own research in association with a senior faculty mentor at Washington University. During the two years, they will teach three undergraduate courses and collaborate in leading an interdisciplinary seminar on theory and methods for advanced undergraduates and beginning graduate students in the humanities and interpretive social sciences.

Applicants should submit, through Interfolio, a cover letter, a description of their research program (no more than 1800 words and accessible to those in other fields), a brief proposal for an interdisciplinary seminar in theory and methods, and a curriculum vitae.  Those who have not completed their doctoral work should indicate, in their cover letter, how many chapters of their dissertation are complete and how complete the remaining chapters are. Applicants should also arrange for the submission of three confidential letters of recommendation via Interfolio.  Please email us at mii@wustl.edu with additional questions. Continue reading