Tag Archives: January 2019

CFP: Przekładaniec Journal of Translation Studies (Krakow)

Deadline: January 30, 2019

Poetry Translation East-West by Zakhar Ishov and Michał Mrugalski

Poetry translation is perpetually enveloped in a paradox: on the one hand, “poetry is what gets lost in translation” (Frost 1995, Croce 1926, Jakobson 1959); on the other, practiced since antiquity, poetry translation has been universally a major moving force behind cultural transfer (Highet 1957, Steiner 1975: 251, Venclova 1979).

In this special themed issue of Przekładaniec we will consider the cultural history, theory and practice of poetry translation in the Slavic context, especially the transfer between Slavic literatures and languages and Western ones. This space is fraught with tensions and contrasts, but sometimes also with parallels and overlaps from grammatical to prosodic ones, from cultural to political, etc. etc. The dichotomy of translatability-untranslatability implies a continuous “accretion of meaning in the process of translational transformations” (Lotman 1990: 3). Each poetic “rewriting” (Lefevre 1992) of texts presupposes an equivalent rewriting of theories as well (Flotow 2000; Munday 2007; Venuti 2013). Therefore, we invite proposals that deal not only with Western-Slavic practices of poetry translation, but also Slavic translation theories. Continue reading

CFP: Wisconsin Slavic Conference

Deadline: January 21, 2019

Wisconsin Slavic Conference | March 29-30, 2019

University of Wisconsin-Madison

Abstracts for 20-minute presentations on any aspect of Slavic literatures, cultures (including film, music, and the visual arts), linguistics, and history are invited for the annual Wisconsin Slavic Conference (formerly AATSEEL-Wisconsin). Comparative topics and interdisciplinary approaches are welcome and encouraged! The conference will be held at the University of Wisconsin-Madison on Friday and Saturday, March 29th and 30th, 2019.

A recent conference program for reference is available here. Continue reading

Grad Program: Master’s Degree in Russia, Eastern Europe and Central Asia (Harvard)

Application Deadline: January 2, 2019, 5PM EST

Master’s Degree in Regional Studies: Russia, Eastern Europe and Central Asia (REECA)
Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies
Harvard University 

The REECA Master’s program can help jump-start your career in academia, government service, NGO management, or the private sector. This two-year, interdisciplinary program allows you to:

  • Study with some of the world’s top scholars working on the region
  • Gain a nuanced understanding of history and current affairs
  • Build proficiency in Russian and other regional languages
  • Take courses at Harvard professional schools
  • Tap into the Harvard alumni network

We especially welcome applicants who would enter the program with high proficiency in Russian and/or other regional languages. Continue reading

CFP: Canadian Association of Slavists Annual Conference (Vancouver)

Deadline to Submit: January 18, 2019

Canadian Association of Slavists annual conference is approaching! Paper and panel proposals are due by January 19th. All are welcome, but note that you will need to join the Canadian Association of Slavists to attend the conference. See below for details:

Canadian Association of Slavists Annual Conference
June 1-3, 2019
University of British Columbia, Vancouver

CALL FOR PAPERS

The annual conference of the Canadian Association of Slavists will take place at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, BC) in early June 2019. The CAS Annual Conference is held as a part of the Congress of the Humanities and Social Sciences with more than 70 national associations in attendance. The theme of the 2019Congress is “Circles of Conversation.” More information is available here: https://www.congress2019.ca/about#theme. Continue reading

Academic Job: 2019-20 Postdoctoral Fellowships (Harvard)

Deadline for Applications: January 10, 2019

The Davis Center Fellows Program offers comprehensive research, training, and professional development opportunities for scholars advancing their careers within the social sciences and humanities. Fellows pursue their research with support from an interdisciplinary community of experts, and with access to world-class resources. The program provides scholars with experiences and connections that endure well beyond their fellowship year.

We welcome research proposals on all topics related to the study of Eurasia. This year’s program will not be structured around an overarching theme. We are, however, particularly interested in applications from scholars with an interest in the following:

1. Teaching a course in Russian imperial history, especially from scholars with experience in digital humanities.

2. Topics exploring the political, economic and social connectivity of Central Asia and/or the Caucasus.

Fellowship Eligibility and Benefits

  • For junior scholars who will have completed the Ph.D. or equivalent by September 2019, but no earlier than September 2014
  • Stipend of up to $40,500 for 9 months or $54,000 for 12 months; a teaching postdoc will be compensated at $46,000 for 9 months
  • $5,000 in additional research funding
  • Eligible for employee benefits, including subsidized health insurance
  • Shared office space and borrowing privileges at Harvard libraries provided
  • Citizens of all countries may apply Continue reading

Funding: Digital Extension Grants (ACLS)

Deadline for Applications: January 16, 2019

ACLS invites applications for ACLS Digital Extension Grants, made possible by the generous assistance of The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. This program supports digitally based research projects in all disciplines of the humanities and related social sciences. It is hoped that these grants will advance humanistic scholarship by enhancing established digital projects and extending their reach to new communities of users.

This program aims to extend the opportunity to participate in the digital transformation of humanistic inquiry to a greater number of humanities scholars. To this end, projects supported by ACLS Digital Extension Grants may:

  • Develop new systems of making established digital research projects and resources available to broader scholarly audiences and/or scholars from institutions such as colleges and universities that serve underrepresented student populations (including HBCUs and HSIs), as well as institutions that historically have been underrepresented in digital humanities research, such as community colleges, regional public colleges and universities, and smaller private colleges.
  • Extend existing digital projects and resources with content that adds interdisciplinary reach or that diversifies the digital domain by incorporating materials or perspectives that have been underrepresented in the digital humanities.
  • Enhance established digital research projects by fostering new team-based collaborations among scholars at a range of career stages, with a special emphasis upon convening and training communities of faculty and graduate students, as well as expanding opportunities for scholars from institutions with limited digital infrastructure.
  • Create new forms and sites for scholarly engagement with the digital humanities.

Continue reading

CFP: “Migrations of Cultures”: An Undergraduate Conference in the Modern Languages (U. of Pittsburgh)

Deadline for Proposals: January 05, 2019

Call for Papers: “Migrations of Cultures”: An Undergraduate Conference in the Modern Languages
University of Pittsburgh March 22-23, 2019

 Share your research with other undergraduate students! Get real feedback on a paper! Gain conference experience for work or graduate school! Interested?  Then send an abstract to a biannual undergraduate research conference hosted by the Modern Languages Departments at the University of Pittsburgh on March 22-23, 2019. Abstracts should be sent to mecchia@pitt.edu by January 5, 2019.

The papers should address the concept of cultural migrations in the broadest sense of the term, that is, immigrations and emigrations in real and virtual spaces linked to the movements of people(s), language(s) and culture(s). We are looking for multiple disciplinary, geographic, and historical perspectives on the conflicts and opportunities created by the shifting flows of populations, languages and cultural traditions throughout the ages and in the contemporary world. The language of the conference is English but we welcome papers addressing Arabic, Chinese, French, German, Italian, Japanese, Portuguese, Russian, and  Spanish languages and cultures.

Our keynote speaker will be Dr Katelyn Knox, Asst. Professor of French at the University of Central Arkansas, author of Race on Display in 20th and 21st Century France (University of Liverpool Press, 2016).  Topics could include:

  • Multilingual societies and their conflicts (“language wars”) and advantages
  • Linguistic landscapes and their evolution
  • Translation as a political tool
  • Literatures of the diaspora
  • Circulation of texts through multiple areas and in multiple languages
  • Travel literature through the ages
  • Exiles, migrants, and refugees
  • Processes of acculturation
  • The politics of cultural production
  • Films and the problems of cultural translation

Papers should be twenty minutes long. Papers will be selected by a selection committee staffed by undergraduates from the University of Pittsburgh. Students who submit abstracts will be notified about acceptance by January 20 2019. All inquiries can be directed to Prof. Giuseppina Mecchia, at mecchia@pitt.eduLimited travel subsidies will be available!

Academic Job: Tenure-Track Assistant Professor Position in Russian Language and Literature (U. of Oklahoma)

Deadline for Applications: January 04, 2019

The Department of Modern Languages, Literatures, and Linguistics at the University of Oklahoma invites applications for a Tenure-Track Assistant Professor position in Russian language and literature. Although the area of research specialization is open, expertise in Russian film, nineteenth-century Russian literature, or Russian-language pedagogy would be particularly welcome. The standard teaching load for tenure-stream faculty in the unit is 2/2 (two courses per semester). 

The successful candidate must have completed a Ph.D. in Slavic Languages and Literatures or an equivalent discipline by the start date of August 2019. In addition, the candidate must have teaching experience at the college-level, native or near-native Russian language skills, and show significant promise of scholarly achievement.

Those interested should upload a cover letter, C.V., three letters of references, complete sets of student teaching evaluations from the last 2 years taught, a graduate-school transcript, and an article-length writing sample tohttps://apply.interfolio.com/58537. Consideration of applications will begin on January 4, 2019 and continue until the position is filled. Questions about the position may be directed to Dr. Emily Johnson: emilydjohnson@ou.edu.

The University of Oklahoma, in compliance with all applicable federal and state laws and regulations does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, sexual orientation, genetic information, gender identity, gender expression, age, religion, disability, political beliefs, or status as a veteran in any of its policies, practices, or procedures. This includes, but is not limited to:  admissions, employment, financial aid, housing, services in educational programs or activities, or health care services that the University operates or provides.

Funding: Project GO Scholarships for ROTC Students (U. of Pittsburgh)

Deadline for Applications: January 18, 2019

Pitt Project GO Scholarships for Intensive Summer Russian Language Study by ROTC Students

About the program: The University of Pittsburgh invites Army, Navy/Marine, and Air Force ROTC students from any US college or university to apply for a Pitt Project GO (Global Officers) scholarship for intensive study of 1st- 4th year Russian in Summer 2019. Project GO is sponsored by the federal Defense Language and National Security Education Office (DLNSEO) and administered nationally by the Institute of International Education (IIE).

Students who have not yet begun their pursuit of Russian are encouraged to apply for an 8-week beginning-level class, which will cover the equivalent of one academic year’s worth of language training. The beginning-level classes, offered by Pitt’s Summer Language Institute (SLI), are held at the University’s main campus in the Oakland neighborhood of Pittsburgh from June 3 – July 26, 2019. Pitt Project GO scholarships for Beginning Russian cover:
•       Full tuition for 8 University of Pittsburgh credits
•       Housing and a living stipend
•       Travel between the student’s home city and Pittsburgh
•       Textbooks Continue reading

CFP: Political and Military Histories of Russian-Kurdish Relations – 19th-21st Centuries (Moscow, Russia)

Deadline for Submissions: January 01, 2019

CALL FOR PROPOSALS
Workshop on
Political and Military Histories of Russian-Kurdish Relations
(19th-21st Centuries)
Moscow, 10-11 June 2019

The involvement of Kurdish forces during the Crimean War inaugurated the political and military encounter of Russians and Kurds between Eastern Europe and the Middle East. Since then, these relations have formed an important and disputed aspect of Russian, and later Soviet, policies in the Middle East. Most significantly, these policies have extended well beyond the clash of the Tsarist and Ottoman Empires at the turn of the 20th century.While Russian and Soviet policies have included a sustained focus on the role of the Kurds, their political mobilization and activism in the 1920s-1930s and during the Cold War, the relationship has never been a simple one. It was deeply entangled in the nexus of regional politics and Russian/Soviet policies toward Turkey, Iran, Iraq and Syria, as well as in global dynamics. Conversely, mobilities and alliances with the ‘’East’’ have been important in shaping political identities, but remain a still understudied part of Kurdish political strategies on the international arena.

Organized as part of the research project RUSKURD (Sciences Po Lille-EHESS), in partnership with the CEFR (Moscow) and the IFEA (Istanbul), this workshop aims at exploring key aspects of the political history of Russian-Kurdish relations. Ph.D candidates, postdoctoral researchers and senior researchers are invited to present research based on historical, social and anthropological methods to explore the place of politics, ideology, violence and wars throughout two centuries.

Possible topics to be discussed include:

  • The changing dynamics of the Russian-Kurdish relation in military encounters since the mid-19th century, integrating local conflicts and imperial power struggles,
  • Techniques of insurgency and counterinsurgency, and their transformations in the wake of imperial collapse,
  • The geopolitical use of Kurdish political and military forces by Russia and the Soviet Union from the 19th to the late 20th century,
  • The interplay of police and military factors, logics and actors in the construction of a new border order framing Russian-Kurdish relations,
  • Routes, forms and techniques of political and military influence (including both people and goods, notably weapons),
  • Transnational political, diplomatic and military circulations.

Travel to and accommodation in Moscow will be taken in charge by the organizers.

Administrative help for visa issues will be provided to successful applicants who would need it.

Proposals consisting of a resume and a short proposal (one-two pages, summarizing the paper, methodology and sources) should be sent before 1 January 2019 to etienne.peyrat@sciencespo-lille.eu. Successful applicants will be notified by the end of January 2019.

Organizing team:

  • Masha Cerovic (EHESS),
  • Adnan Çelik (IFEA),
  • Etienne Peyrat (Sciences Po)

More on the project:

https://ruskurd.hypotheses.org/