Tag Archives: March 2017

Academic Job: Latvian Instructor (BALSSI)

Deadline for Applications: March 21, 2017

The Summer Language Workshop of Indiana University (http://www.indiana.edu/~swseel/) in conjunction with the Baltic Studies Summer Institute (BALSSI) seeks an instructor to teach an intensive course in Latvian language at the introductory level for an eight-week appointment  from June 3 through July 28.

Course offering is contingent upon enrollment. We encourage applications from candidates who can also teach introductory-intermediate Russian. In the event that Latvian enrollments are low, a suitable candidate could be offered a Russian teaching opportunity.

Applicants should submit a letter of interest, CV, and the names and contact information of three references. Send all items to: swseel@indiana.edu with LATVIAN INSTRUCTOR in the subject line.

Applications will be accepted until the position is filled but to ensure consideration, please submit all materials by March 21.

Questions about the position can be directed to Mark Trotter at 812-856-5247 or martrott@indiana.edu.

Prof. Devel.: Summer Research Laboratory (U. of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign)

Deadline for Applications: March 15, 2017

2017 SUMMER RESEARCH LABORATORY ON RUSSIA, EASTERN EUROPE, AND EURASIA

June 12 – August 4, 2017

OVERVIEW

For more than 40 years, the Summer Research Laboratory (SRL) on Russia, Eastern Europe, and Eurasia has provided a vital comprehensive research opportunity, giving researchers access to unparalleled library services and to one of the top five library collections for the REEE region in North America. SRL allows scholars to advance their research, forge professional connections through workshops and conferences, and share their research data, methods, and findings with US government (USG) departments and agencies.

REEEC originally established SRL to provide access to the extensive holdings in the Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Collection at the International and Area Studies Library to scholars with limited resources at their home institutions. Over time, REEEC and SRS have developed a range of integrated programs to enhance the research experience of associates. SRL is held during an eight-week summer session, the first four weeks of which often include discussion groups, lectures, conferences, and other networking events, while the final four weeks are dedicated independent library research.

SRL is open to all scholars with research interests in the Russian, East European and Eurasian region for eight weeks during the summer months from mid-June through the first week of August. The SRL provides scholars access to the resources of the world renowned Slavic, East European, and Eurasian collection within a flexible time frame where scholars have the opportunity to receive one-on-one research assistance from the librarians of the Slavic Reference Service (SRS).

For graduate students, it provides an opportunity to conduct dissertation research prior to going abroad and a way to prioritize which resources to target after exhausting materials found within the US.

Applicants to the Summer Research Laboratory are encouraged to consider studying an area language at the Indiana University Summer Language Workshop from June 5 to July 28. Funding in the form of Title VIII fellowships and other sources is available to eligible applicants. For more information and to apply: http://www.indiana.edu/~swseel Continue reading

Study Abroad: Program for Students Abroad and Human Rights Summer Program (Auschwitz Jewish Center)

Deadline for Abroad Program: March 6, 2017

Deadline for Human Rights Summer Program: April 17, 2017

The Auschwitz Jewish Center, affiliated with the Museum of Jewish Heritage in New York City, offers immersive academic programs on topics related to the Holocaust and Polish-Jewish history year-round. Programs are led by trained staff with advanced degrees in the field and open to undergraduate and graduate students as well as young professionals.

Program for Students Abroad
April 6 – 9, 2017
Long weekend subsidized programs in Krakow with a scholarly visit to Auschwitz (Oświęcim) for students studying in Europe, Israel, and the region. Deadline: March 6, 2017

Human Rights Summer Program
June 18 – 25, 2017
One-week intensive program in Warsaw, Oświęcim, and Kraków utilizing Poland as a case study to examine broader human rights issues. Deadline: April 17, 2017

The Auschwitz Jewish Center also offers Customized Programs for groups of all sizes and backgrounds throughout the year. For more information on these and other funded and subsidized opportunities, please visit ajcf.pl/en/education-center or contact DBramson@mjhnyc.org.

Study Abroad: Summer Internship Program in Russia (Crossroads Eurasia)

Application Deadline: March 15, 2017

Crossroads Eurasia, a career-focused summer work experience is still accepting applications for its summer internship program in Russia. 

Students can choose one of three options:

  • Camp counseling. One of the best introductions to Russia one can have. Best for beginners of the language, looking for a friendly and structured atmosphere.
  • Teaching English. Highly immersive and flexible, with coaching by local teachers. Similar in style to well-known overseas programs for recent graduates. Recommended for heritage speakers, and those students with at least intermediate level of Russian.
  • Translation. As close as students will come to actually working in Russia. We recommend it both to students interested in translation specifically as well as advanced or heritage speakers, looking for an experience like no other.

Post-program, students receive career coaching to help them communicate the value of the experience, and an alumni network can inform their next career steps.  

Internships are located in places where the pace of life is slower — Kostroma, Voronezh, and Ryazan. In every location, students spend time with locals and come away with some genuine friendships. Every city has a local coordinator.

Accommodations, meals, visa support and travel assistance is provided, as would be expected.

More information is available on our website at: www.CrossroadsEurasia.com or if you would like to contact the director, at: vgorshkov@crossroadseurasia.com.

Job: Foreign Service Office Management Specialist (U.S. Dept. of State)

Deadline for Applications: March 14, 2017

Position Title: Foreign Service Office Management Specialist
Series/Grade: FP – 0318 07/07
Salary: $35,718 – $52,453
Promotion Potential: 03
Position Information: Work Schedule is Full-time – Permanent after tenure granted by a Foreign Service Specialist (FSS) Tenure Board.
Hiring Agency: U.S. Department of State
Duty Locations: MANY vacancies – Department of State Posts – Overseas and Domestic, United States

Responsibilities include providing and managing a range of administrative and office management functions including:

  • Managing the calendar(s) and schedule(s) for senior staff,
  • Proofing, editing, tracking and filing documents,
  • Preparing agenda and materials for meetings,
  • Providing computer and mobile device support,
  • Knowledge management,
  • Planning and assisting with official events and visitors.

An OMS must adhere to the highest standards of integrity, dependability, attention to detail, teamwork and cooperation while accepting the need to travel, to live overseas, and when necessary, to live away from family.

The Department of State is developing a rank-order list of eligible hires for a limited number of FSS vacancies based on the needs of the Department. To learn more about the Department of State and a career as an FSS, please visit us at https://careers.state.gov/work/foreign-service/specialist/career-tracks#.

For more information, and to apply, click here.

Internship: Career-Focused Summer Internships in Russia (Crossroads Eurasia)

Deadline for Applications: March 15, 2017

Crossroads Eurasia is still accepting applications for its summer internship program in Russia. The current application deadline is March 15, 2017. 

Students can choose one of three options:

  • Camp counseling. One of the best introductions to Russia one can have. Best for beginners of the language, looking for a friendly and structured atmosphere.
  • Teaching English. Highly immersive and flexible, with coaching by local teachers. Similar in style to well-known overseas programs for recent graduates. Recommended for heritage speakers, and those students with at least intermediate level of Russian.
  • Translation. As close as students will come to actually working in Russia. We recommend it both to students interested in translation specifically as well as advanced or heritage speakers, looking for an experience like no other.

Post-program, students receive career coaching to help them communicate the value of the experience, and an alumni network can inform their next career steps.  

Internships are located in places where the pace of life is slower — Kostroma, Voronezh, and Ryazan. In every location, students spend time with locals and come away with some genuine friendships. Every city has a local coordinator.

Accommodations, meals, visa support and travel assistance is provided, as would be expected.

More information is available on the website at: www.CrossroadsEurasia.com. If you have any questions vgorshkov@crossroadseurasia.com

Internship: Program Analyst-Student Trainee (U.S. Dept. of State)

Deadline for Applications: March 03, 2017

Now accepting applications for the U.S. Department of State Pathways Internship Experience Program (IEP) in our Washington D.C. location.

Visit USAJOBS to start the online application process and view the following vacancy announcement numbers.

Please note the cutoff point for these positions: These vacancy announcements will be open from February 27 to March 3, 2017 or when 100 applications have been received. The vacancy will close on whichever day the first of these conditions is met. If the application limit is reached on the same day the announcement opened, the open and close date will be the same. Candidates are encouraged to read the entire announcement before submitting their application packages.
Continue reading

Job: Associate Director, Summer Language Workshop (Indiana U.)

Deadline for Applications: March 16, 2017

Associate Director, Summer Language Workshop, Indiana University

Job Summary: Manages the day-to-day operations of the Summer Language Workshop in compliance with IU and federal policies and procedures. Hires and supervises staff (one full time administrative secretary and temporary/part-time student employees); and establishes policies and procedures within the Workshop. Oversees both the student application and registration processes as well as the unit’s funding (preparing budgets, purchasing, supervising accounts manager, preparing multiple grant performance reports). Implements grant activities (planning outreach and proficiency testing); organizes advisory meetings; and consults with faculty, other IU units, and external organizations (ex. other Title VIII-funded programs) on grant projects. Directs outreach activities to promote the Workshop to students and teachers, academia and general audience; and establishes and maintains contacts with Workshop’s alumni.

Required Qualifications:

Bachelor’s degree and two years of experience in a communication, outreach, or student development position at a university, international organization, NGO, or equivalent.

Knowledge of Russian, other East European language, or Central Asian language. Demonstrated computer skills including familiarity with databases, spreadsheets, and word processing. Excellent interpersonal, written and verbal communication skills including ability to interact and communicate effectively with a wide variety of individuals. Exceptional concentration and attention to detail and ability to work effectively with frequent interruptions.

For more information, and to apply: https://iujobs.peopleadmin.com/postings/32678

Academic Job: Asst. Professor in Russian (Colby College)

Deadline for Applications: March 10, 2017

Assistant Professor in Russian at COLBY COLLEGE (Waterville, Maine)

The Department of German and Russian at Colby College welcomes applications for a tenure-track position as Assistant Professor of Russian to begin September 1, 2017. We are seeking a broadly-trained colleague in Russian literature, language, and culture who has a well-articulated research plan and a demonstrated interest in liberal arts education. Expertise in 19th-century Russian literature with interest in innovative and interdisciplinary approaches preferred (for example, digital humanities, theater and performance studies, visual studies, gender and sexuality studies, global studies or environmental studies). Ph.D. in relevant field required at time of appointment. Native or near-native fluency in Russian and English along with experience or a stated interest in active program building and leadership expected. The ideal candidate will be able to document a dedication to and excellence in language teaching, experience at various levels of the undergraduate curriculum, a readiness to be actively involved in extracurricular programming, anda desire to promote through their research, teaching, and/or service diversity, inclusion and equity at Colby.

For more information, see: http://www.colby.edu/germanrussian

Please submit a cover letter explaining interests in and qualifications for the position, a curriculum vitae, three letters of recommendation, a statement of teaching philosophy and research interests, and recent evaluations for two or more language courses via Interfolio at the following link,http://apply.interfolio.com/40826. Continue reading

CFP: History, Memory, Politics: The Russian Revolution 100 Years On (Scando-Slavica)

Deadline for Submission: March 1, 2017

Call for papers for a special issue of Scando-Slavica dedicated to:

History, Memory, Politics: The Russian Revolution 100 Years On

2017 marks the 100th anniversary of the Russian Revolution, or the “Great October Revolution” as it was called in the Soviet Union. Back then, there was no doubt that the Revolution was truly “great.” But in the 25 years that have passed since the dissolution of the Soviet Union, the meaning of the Revolution has become highly contested.

The lack of consensus regarding the meaning and significance of the Revolution represents a challenge to the goal of current Russian politics of memory. At present, Russia is ruled by a regime that emphasises the longue durée of Russian history, in order to foster patriotism by means of a positive, coherent and uncontested understanding of the past. Unified textbooks in history have been singled out as particularly important in creating this patriotism. The current regime aims at overall consensus and unity both in terms of a shared understanding of the past and as a characteristic of Russia in the past. Symptomatically, while Vladimir Putin did mention the 1917 Revolution in his annual address to the parliament in December 2016, he provided no clear conclusion on how to understand it, but chose instead to emphasise that in spite of our difficult past “we are one people.”

In post-Soviet Russia, the celebration of the Revolution has been replaced by the celebration of the end of the early seventeenth-century Time of Troubles. What makes a celebration of the Revolution particularly difficult in today’s Russia is that its current regime fears revolutions more than anything else, suffice it to mention the “Colour Revolutions” in the “Near Abroad” or the Arabic Spring. At the same time, the regime legitimises its politics with reference to history, by claiming that it sustains Russia’s “thousand-year-old history.” Although the Revolution inevitably challenges the hegemonic quest for consensus, it is nevertheless a historical fact that cannot be passed over in silence. Thus, the question is where the revolutionary moment of 1917 – an event that we have been accustomed to think of in terms of rupture – fits in today? Was it in the long run merely a superficial event? Was it the expression of a revolutionary chaos that had to be overcome? Or was it itself the beginning of a recovery of the Russian state and its empire from war chaos and dissolution? How are the revolutionary events of 1917 framed in different contexts and by different voices in the contemporary public and academic debates?

This special issue invites scholars to analyse how the 1917 Russian Revolution is understood and discussed in today’s Russia. We welcome creative and theoretically reflective analyses of an engaging empirical material. We are interested in both how the anniversary itself is celebrated (or not), and in the ways in which talking about the Revolution have developed since 2000. Possible fields and topics to discuss include (but are not limited to):

  • The Revolution in light of the current regime’s instrumentalisation of history
  • The Revolution in the Russian public debate – among the opposition as well as the supporters of the regime
  • The Revolution in Russian cultural policy, education and textbooks
  • The Revolution and contemporary politics of memory
  • The Revolution in contemporary Russian literature
  • The Revolution and the Russian Orthodox Church
  • Prevailing attitudes to the Revolution in today’s Russia: rupture or transition? Resource or threat to stability?
  • Discrepancies between public and scholarly debates on the Revolution

The editors of this special issue will in the first run make a selection of articles for peer review on the basis of submitted abstracts. A final decision on which articles to include will be made after the double blind peer-review process. The special issue of Scando-Slavica will be published as volume 64 (1), 2018. Scando-Slavica is published by Routledge (Taylor & Francis Group), and is indexed in Scopus, ESCI and ERIH PLUS. Contributions may be submitted in English or Russian.

Timeline

  • Deadline for abstract proposals (300 words): 1 March 2017. Please submit to the guest editorskare.mjor@ucrs.uu.se and ingunn.lunde@if.uib.no.
  • Notification of acceptance of abstracts: 20 March 2017
  • Deadline for completed article drafts for peer-review (40 000 characters incl. spaces): 15 July 2017
  • Peer-reviewing/revisions: August–November 2017
  • Final decisions and acceptance: November 2017

Guest Editors

  • Kåre Johan Mjør, Researcher of Russian Intellectual History, Uppsala Centre for Russian and Eurasian Studies, kare.mjor@ucrs.uu.se
  • Ingunn Lunde, Professor of Russian, University of Bergen, ingunn.lunde@if.uib.no