Monthly Archives: October 2013

“ADAPTING ETHNICITY” feat. SHERMAN ALEXIE

ONLY ONE WEEK TO THE TILTS FALL FINALE!
Join us as we wrap up the first half of TILTS 2013-2014
with a dynamic discussion on:
“ADAPTING ETHNICITY”
feat. SHERMAN ALEXIE

Monday, Oct. 28, 4:30pm
Texas Union Theater (UNB 2.228)

In conjunction with the screening of Winter in the Blood at this year’s Austin Film Festival, the Texas Institute for Literary & Textual Studies (TILTS) welcomes author and filmmaker Sherman Alexie to UT Austin for a panel discussion on “Adapting Ethnicity.” Alexie, one of the associate producers of Winter in the Blood, will join directors and writers Alex and Andrew Smith, writer Ken White, and cast members Lily Gladstone, Chaske Spencer, and Dana Wheeler-Nicholson to explore the complexities of reading race in literature and film, writing and casting characters of color, and adapting culture and cultural representations for the big screen. Lois Welch will also be in attendance to talk about the adaptation of her husband James Welch’s novel into film.

Seating is limited, so please arrive early. Doors open at 4pm.
A reception will follow in the Santa Rita Suite of the Union (UNB 3.502). 

Inline image 1
About Alexie

Sherman Alexie has won a National Book Award for The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian (2007), the PEN/Hemingway Award for The Lone Ranger & Tonto Fistfight in Heaven (1993), a National Endowment for the Arts Poetry Fellowship, the Pushcart Prize, and the PEN/Malamud Award, to name a few. In addition to Winter in the Blood, his film credits include Smoke Signals (1998), a critically acclaimed movie inspired by his short story “This Is What It Means to Say Phoenix, Arizona.” With a style that has been described as “emotionally spring-loaded, linguistically gymnastic, and devastatingly funny,” Alexie captures both the trauma and dignity of contemporary Native American life.

About TILTS
The 2013-2014 edition of TILTS, “Reading Race in Literature & Film,” brings together scholars, artists, filmmakers, and writers for conversations about the ways that we experience race and ethnicity. TILTS is an annual, multidisciplinary initiative that showcases dynamic scholarship in literary and textual based studies.

Sponsors
TILTS is sponsored by the Office of the President, the Vice-Provost, the College of Liberal Arts, and the Department of English of The University of Texas at Austin. The co-sponsor of this event is the Austin Film Festival.


TILTS Directors
Dr. James Cox (jhcox@austin.utexas.edu)
Dr. Domino Perez (drperez@austin.utexas.edu)
Dr. Jennifer Wilks (jmwilks@austin.utexas.edu)

Contact Information
Email: tilts2014@gmail.com
Website: http://www.utexas.edu/cola/insts/tilts-2014/
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Tilts2014
Twitter: https://twitter.com/TILTS2014

The Moscow-Texas Connections Program: A Fulbright-Hays Group Project Abroad

Are you interested in studying Russian in Moscow but don’t have a fortune to spend on traveling to/ living in one of the most expensive cities in the world? Introducing…  

A Fulbright-Hays Group Project Abroad (GPA) 

Moscow-Texas Connections is an intensive 10-week Russian language program run by CREEES and sponsored by the U.S. Department of Education.

Students must be at an intermediate level of Russian by the program start date (this would entail an intermediate score on the Oral Proficiency Interview or two semesters of Intensive Russian language: RUS 601C and 611C). The program is scheduled to run every year through the summer of 2016, so come find out more even if you haven’t yet set foot in a Russian language class! More information, including eligibility requirements, program application, and other details can be found online at http://www.utexas.edu/cola/centers/creees/outreach/fulbright-hays-moscow.php.

Deadline to apply for Summer 2014: December 2, 2013 by 5:00pm.
Thank you!

Department of Slavic and Eurasian Studies &
Center for Russian, East European, Eurasian Studies
The University of Texas at Austin, BUR 444
2505 University Ave., Stop F3600
Austin, TX 78712
Tel. (512) 232-9123
Fax (512) 471-6710

Ethnic and Third World (E3W) Literatures group

We invite you to join the Ethnic and Third World (E3W) Literatures group on Friday, October 18, 2013, from 1pm to 2pm in PAR 312 for a meeting to discuss the Spring 2014 issue of the E3W Review of Books. If you are thinking about contributing to the Review as an editor or reviewer, this meeting will provide you with more information about the publication. Reviewer and editor guides (and snacks!) will also be distributed.

Please read the Call for Reviews below (also attached as a PDF) E3W Review of Books.CFR.2014. You may contact e3wsubmit@gmail.com with any questions about the Review. We look forward to seeing you next week!

-The E3W Review of Books Co-Editors: Emily Lederman and Laura K. Wallace

********

The editors of the Ethnic and Third World Review of Books invite submissions for our Spring 2014 issue. The Review, published annually by the Ethnic and Third World Literature concentration in the Department of English at UT, offers opportunities for graduate students and faculty in departments across UT to write and edit reviews of fiction, poetry, and non-fiction books published in the last three years in the fields of ethnic, third world, and postcolonial literatures and cultures. The Review also publishes interviews, archival reviews, and reviews of foundational texts on relevant topics. This year’s issue will feature reviews of the work of Eve Dunbar (author of Black Regions of the Imagination: African American Writers Between the Nation and the World, 2012) and Kenneth Kidd (author of Freud in Oz: At the Intersections of Psychoanalysis and Children’s Culture, 2011), both distinguished alumni of the E3W specialization and keynote speakers at this year’s Sequels Symposium (April 10-11, 2014). If you are interested in writing a review for the General Section, please submit the title, author, and complete publication information of the book you’d like to review to e3wsubmit@gmail.com by November 13. You may also send a message to this address requesting a list of suggested titles for review. Please note that the submission deadline for completed reviews is December 13, 2013.

In addition to our general reviews section, we are soliciting reviews for four special sections:“LGBTQ and the Family,” “Young Adult and Children’s Fiction,” “Ethnic Regionalisms and National Imaginaries,” and “Ecocriticism: Continuities and Transformations”

LGBTQ and the Family

In its ruling on United States v. Windsor earlier this year, the U.S. Supreme Court found Section Three of the Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA) unconstitutional, thus extending federal benefits, such as Social Security and health insurance, to couples legally married in states that sanction same-sex marriage. According to the majority opinion, in restricting federal recognition of marriage to heterosexual couples, Section Three not only violated gay couples’ right to equal protection, but also refused them their “personhood and dignity.” There are, however, those within the LGBTQ community who fear that legalizing gay marriage creates a temporary solution to the much larger social and institutional injustices that affect all families. Furthermore, critics also suggest that championing gay marriage means reinforcing traditional ideas of relationships and families, ultimately ignoring diverse family structures and political possibilities. This section welcomes reviews of recent fiction and non-fiction that explores issues around LGBTQ politics, queer theory, and the domestic. For more information and a list of potential titles, please email Yvette DeChavez at ymdechavez@gmail.com or Laura Thain atlthain@utexas.edu by November 13.

Young Adult and Children’s Fiction

In Freud in Oz, UT-Austin alum Kenneth Kidd examines how the structure and content of children’s literature engaged with and influenced the developing field of psychoanalysis. Though the complexity and theoretical value of this form of literature has often been underestimated, a rising interest in young adult and children’s studies has focused more scholarly attention to a formerly neglected field. Additionally, in popular culture, the appeal of young adult and children’s literature has expanded far beyond its intended audience. This special section seeks to explore the ways in which this literature is used as a vehicle for cultural, social, and moral instruction, as well as the broader implications of a literature which not only reflects, but responds to and impacts existing social and psychological theories. We invite reviews of recent young adult and children’s fiction and critical texts dealing with this body of work. Please email Lily Zhu at lazhu@utexas.edu or Erin Cotter at ejcotter@utexas.edu by November 13 with your proposals or to request a list of recommended titles.

Ethnic Regionalisms and National Imaginaries

Framed by UT-Austin alum Eve Dunbar’s Black Regions of the Imagination: African American Writers Between the Nation and the World (2012)this section examines works that explore regional and ethnic imaginaries not necessarily constrained by the physical or bounded geographies of the nation. Dunbar’s formulation of the region problematizes ethnicity and language and imagines place as not just geographically fixed but also as a concept that we bring with us. This section seeks to include reviews of texts that incorporate, question, subvert, and resist anthropological, ethnographic, or other colonial discourses. Books reviewed for this section will also engage struggles over sovereignties and borders. Please email Katie Logan atkatie.logan1@gmail.com or Regina Mills at regina.mills@utexas.edu by November 13 with your proposals or to request a list of suggested titles.

Ecocriticism: Continuities and Transformations

In a recent essay in Wild Things: Children’s Culture and Ecocriticism, UT-Austin alum Kenneth Kidd acknowledges that our experience of nature is always mediated through culture. “The issue,” he writes, “is how so, with what continuities and transformations?” Inspired by Kidd’s provocative question, this special section of the E3W Review of Books explores the continuing development of ecocriticism as a mode of inquiry across a diverse range of fields. How is ecocritical thought used to reconfigure oppositions between nature/culture, subject/object, and the human/nonhuman? And what happens when we flip the lens, asking instead how our experience of culture is mediated through nature or place? Books reviewed for this section will take up ecocriticism in all its forms, as well as its intersections with (among others) feminist and queer theory, affect theory, theology and religion, psychoanalysis, postcolonial theory, material culture, and object-oriented thought. We also encourage reviews that consider how genres like children’s literature, travel writing, pop culture, poetry, and film are being transformed by encounters with our ecologically at-risk planet. Email Anne Stewart at annesgreat@gmail.comor Jesi Egan at jesiegan@gmail.com with proposals or to request a list of suggested titles by November 13.

Emily Ann Lederman, M.A.
Assistant Instructor, Department of Rhetoric and Writing
University of Texas at Austin

Texas Institute for Literary & Textual Studies (TILTS) welcomes author and filmmaker Sherman Alexie to UT Austin and the Texas Book Festival.

In conjunction with the screening of Winter in the Blood at this year’s Austin Film Festival, the Texas Institute for Literary & Textual Studies (TILTS) welcomes author and filmmaker Sherman Alexie to UT Austin and the Texas Book Festival.

Texas Book Festival
Sun, Oct. 27, 1:15pm-2:15pm
Capitol Auditorium Room E1.004
Texas State Capitol, 112 E. 11th St.

Alexie will appear at the Texas Book Festival (TBF) to discuss his new work, Blasphemy, and the 20th anniversary of The Lone Ranger and Tonto Fistfight in Heaven. Book signing to follow in the TBF Signing Tent. Additional details on the Texas Book Festival are available at: texasbookfestival.org


“Adapting Ethnicity” Panel

Mon. Oct 28, 4:30pm
Texas Union Theater

University of Texas at Austin


Alexie, one of the associate producers of Winter in the Blood, will join directors and writers Alex and Andrew Smith, writer Ken White, and cast members Lily Gladstone, Julia Jones, Chaske Spencer, and Dana Wheeler-Nicholson to explore the complexities of reading race in literature and film, writing and casting characters of color, and adapting culture and cultural representations for the big screen. Lois Welch will also be in attendance to talk about the adaptation of her husband James Welch’s novel into film.


A reception will follow in the Santa Rita Suite of the Union (UNB 3.502). Doors for the panel open at 4:00pm. Seating is limited, so please arrive early.
About Alexie

Sherman Alexie has won a National Book Award for The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian (2007), the PEN/Hemingway Award for The Lone Ranger & Tonto Fistfight in Heaven (1993), a National Endowment for the Arts Poetry Fellowship, the Pushcart Prize, and the PEN/Malamud Award, to name a few. In addition to Winter in the Blood, his film credits include Smoke Signals (1998), a critically acclaimed movie inspired by his short story “This Is What It Means to Say Phoenix, Arizona.” With a style that has been described as “emotionally spring-loaded, linguistically gymnastic, and devastatingly funny,” Alexie captures both the trauma and dignity of contemporary Native American life.

About TILTS
The 2013-2014 edition of TILTS, “Reading Race in Literature & Film,” brings together scholars, artists, filmmakers, and writers for conversations about the ways that we experience race and ethnicity. TILTS is an annual, multidisciplinary initiative that showcases dynamic scholarship in literary and textual based studies.

Sponsors
TILTS is sponsored by the Office of the President, the Vice-Provost, the College of Liberal Arts, and the Department of English of The University of Texas at Austin. The co-sponsor of this event is the Austin Film Festival.


TILTS Directors
Dr. James Cox (jhcox@austin.utexas.edu)
Dr. Domino Perez (drperez@austin.utexas.edu)
Dr. Jennifer Wilks (jmwilks@austin.utexas.edu)

Contact Information
Email: tilts2014@gmail.com
Website: http://www.utexas.edu/cola/insts/tilts-2014/
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Tilts2014
Twitter: https://twitter.com/TILTS2014

Comparative Literature Graduate Student Conference “What We Read: Materiality, Narrative, Text”

Join us this Friday, October 11th for the tenth annual Comparative Literature Graduate Student Conference “What We Read: Materiality, Narrative, Text” and our plenary address by Dr. N. Katherine Hayles.
“The Book and the Document: Materiality and Deformation”
Friday, October 11th
5:30PM – CLA 0.126
Reception to follow
N. Katherine Hayles is Professor of Literature and Director of Graduate Studies at Duke University. She teaches and writes on the relations of literature, science and technology in the 20th and 21st centuries. Her book “How We Became Posthuman: Virtual Bodies in Cybernetics, Literature and Informatics” won the Rene Wellek Prize for the Best Book in Literary Theory for 1998-99, and her book Writing Machines won the Suzanne Langer Award for Outstanding Scholarship. Her most recent book is How We Think: Digital Media and Contemporary Technogenesis.
Find attached our official program for times and locations of all the day’s events. Follow us for updates and other news on our website at: http://gracls2013.tumblr.com/
Best,
Cory Hahn and Hannah Alpert-Abrams

Archives Week

Archives Week is an annual celebration of historical archives and their role in society put on by UT’s student chapter of the Society of American Archivists. Archives play an important role in caring for and providing access to historical records, both paper and digital. This year’s theme is “Technology in the Archives” and includes events that demonstrate how emerging technologies affect and are used in archives, as well as the current research in digital archives being done at UT’s School of Information. If you have ever wondered what an archivist is or how archives save historical digital files, then these events are for you! Please join us for any or all of them.

Monday October 14th:

Event: “Getting Medieval with Crowdsourcing: Utilizing Flickr and Social Media to Describe Medieval Manuscript Fragments”

Speaker: Micah Erwin, Project Archivist & Medieval Manuscripts Specialist, Harry Ransom Center

Time: Snacks at 5:30 p.m., Presentation 6-7 p.m.

Location:  Benson Latin American Collection, Second Floor Conference Room (2300 Red River St)

Over the past two years Micah Erwin has lead a project to survey and describe medieval manuscript fragments, or binder’s waste, in the Ransom Center’s book collection. Micah will share how the project has utilized Flickr and social media to “crowdsource” the identification of many of these fragments.

Tuesday October 15th:

Event: iSchool Research Colloquium: “Orders and authenticity: Lifetime serializations of digital objects” by Dr. Patricia Galloway

Time: 3:15-4:30 p.m.

Location: UTA 1.208 (1616 Guadalupe St)

Dr. Galloway will discuss the archiving of digital records from the perspective of a formal “order as received” based upon groupings of digital files on received legacy media prepared by or for a donor and documented through description of the set of derivative orderings available through the original operating system environment. Dr. Galloway will also discuss the repeated undocumented serializations to which digital objects are subject throughout their lives and how only a few of these activities are formalized as “refreshing,” “migration,” or “reformatting.”

Event: Digital Archaeology Lab Demonstration

Time: 5:30 p.m.

Location: Digital Archaeology Lab, UTA 5.508 (1616 Guadalupe St)

Dr. Galloway and a team of iSchool students will give a tour of the Digital Archaeology lab and demonstrate the equipment. The digital archaeology lab is used for research and education in digital forensics and contains a complete forensic workstation, a variety of media drives, and current and legacy software for the purpose of recovering digital objects from noncurrent environments for transfer into a preservation environment.

Wednesday October 16th:

Event: iSchool Doctoral Student Presentations

Speakers: Jane Gruning and Jessica Meyerson

Time: 6:00 p.m.

Location: UTA 1.208 (1616 Guadalupe St)

Come hear two iSchool doctoral students, Jane Gruning and Jessica Meyerson, present on their current research in digital archives. Jane will talk about the connection between digital preservation and human computer interaction, whether people think of digital objects as less “real” than physical objects, and whether this decreases the likelihood that digital objects will be preserved. Jessica will talk about her interests in combining research and practice, “persistence” in social infrastructure for digital preservation and representation of hybrid collections online.

Friday October 18th:

Event: Happy Hour

Time: 6:00 p.m.

Location: Easy Tiger, 709 E. 6th Street

Help us celebrate Archives Week with a happy hour at Easy Tiger. All archivists, students, alumni, and Austin archival enthusiasts are welcome to join.

Saturday October 19th:

Event: Home Movie Day

Time: 1-4:00 p.m.

Location: The Austin Film Society Screening Room, 1901 E 51st St, Austin, TX 78723

Join the Texas Archive of the Moving Image (http://www.texasarchive.org) and Austin’s Experimental Response Cinema (http://ercatx.org) for the 2013 edition of Home Movie Day. Home Movie Day is a celebration of amateur films and filmmaking held annually at local venues worldwide. Home Movie Day provides the opportunity for individuals and families to see and share their own home movies with an audience of their community and to see their neighbors’ in turn.  We are able to screen your 8mm, Super 8mm, and 16 mm films as well as home movies you’ve already digitized and transferred to DVD. Transfers of VHS will be limited to 10-minute segments, so please preview your DVDs. Members of the Texas Archive of the Moving Image and Experimental Response Cinema will be present to help look over and project your films and will be showcasing items from their collections. Come by with your movies and enjoy them with others. Drop by for an hour or stay all day!

You can find out more about these events on our Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/saautx. Feel free to send any questions to saautx@gmail.com. Hope to see you soon!

University of Texas at Austin Society of American Archivists Student Chapter

CALL FOR PAPERS for the 11th Annual Duke-UNC Islamic Studies Graduate Student Conference in February 2014. This year’s theme is “Cartographies of Islam: Creating Locations and Places Beyond Meaning.”

From: duke unc <dukeuncconf@gmail.comCFPDukeUNCIslamicStudies2014

Please see the attached CALL FOR PAPERS for the 11th Annual Duke-UNC Islamic Studies Graduate Student Conference in February 2014. This year’s theme is “Cartographies of Islam: Creating Locations and Places Beyond Meaning.”

If you could forward this CFP to a listserv that reaches your graduate students, we would greatly appreciate it.


Duke-UNC Graduate Islamic Studies
Conference Committee

Call for Papers for Trans-Scripts, the interdisciplinary journal in the Humanities and Social Sciences at UC Irvine

Attached please find a Call for Papers for Trans-Scripts, the interdisciplinary journal in the Humanities and Social Sciences at UC Irvine. Please distribute this CFP to your graduate students at your earliest convenience. The deadline for submissions is January 10, 2014.

The theme of the fourth volume of Trans-Scripts is “Constructing (Dis)Ability.” We welcome a wide range of submissions from a variety of disciplines. Founded in 2010, Trans-Scripts is a student-run and edited interdisciplinary journal, and the editorial collective of graduate students come from diverse academic fields, including English, History, Culture & Theory, Psychology and Social Behavior, Anthropology, Philosophy, Women’s Studies, and African-American Studies. Faculty advisors represent an even more varied range of disciplines. All submissions will be reviewed by both students and faculty to ensure the highest quality of work. Though primarily a forum for student work, faculty are welcome to contribute as well. We also publish editorials by renowned experts on each theme covered.

For more information, the Trans-Scripts journal can be accessed at the following website: http://www.humanities.uci.edu/collective/hctr/trans-scripts/ Please direct all general inquiries about the journal or any comments on published pieces to our 2013-2014 volume’s Editor-in-Chief, Andrea Milne, at milnea@uci.edu Trans-Scripts 2014 CFP

 

Thank you,

Andrea Milne

The Trans-Scripts Editorial Collective