Norah Ashoura wins the Science in Plain English Contest! Congratulations, Norah!

Graduate Researcher Norah Ashoura wins the Science in Plain English contest, sponsored by UT’s Science Communications Interest Group, by giving remarks comparing cancer to Darth Vader and the hapless immune system to Jedi Knights in the Star Wars universe. She won a trip to one of the largest gatherings of scientists, which is happening this week, the annual meeting for the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS).

https://cns.utexas.edu/news/fight-cancer-she-must

Nature Medicine Focuses on Influenza

The November Nature Medicine issue focused on recent progress in influenza vaccine research, and published two critical papers from our group highlighting how influenza vaccines may be improved.

http://www.nature.com/nm/journal/v22/n12/abs/nm.4224.html
http://www.nature.com/nm/journal/v22/n12/abs/nm.4223.html
https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/11/161115145854.htm
http://che.utexas.edu/2016/11/15/flu-vaccines-effectiveness-can-be-improved/

Antibodies that could help develop a vaccine for HIV

George Georgiou, a professor of engineering and molecular biosciences at the University of Texas at Austin, and his colleagues have developed a hybrid antibody that neutralized 99 percent of HIV-1 strains tested. The antibody is based on so-called “broadly-neutralizing antibodies,” a group of antibodies from HIV-infected patients that are able to take down an array of rapidly mutating HIV-1 viruses.

The research was published last week in the journal Science Immunology.

https://cns.utexas.edu/news/hybrid-antibody-takes-down-hiv

https://news.utexas.edu/2016/11/15/new-findings-on-flu-vaccines-effectiveness

http://www.contagionlive.com/news/duke-may-have-developed-the-most-powerful-hiv-destroying-antibody-thus-far

Enzyme Safely Starves Cancer Cells in Preclinical Study

A research team led by scientists at The University of Texas Austin has engineered an enzyme that safely treats prostate and breast cancer in animals and also lengthens the lifespan of models that develop chronic lymphocytic leukemia. The new treatment and results from preclinical trials are described in a paper published in the Nov. 21 issue of Nature Medicine.

https://news.utexas.edu/2016/12/09/enzyme-starves-cancer-cells