Ben Gregg: Recent Publications and Presentations

“Teaching Human Rights in the College Classroom as a Cognitive Style,” in J. Shefner, H. Dahms, R. Jones, and A. Jalata, eds., Social Justice and the University, Basingstoke, United Kingdom: Palgrave (forthcoming 2014)

“Might the Noble Savage have Joined the Earliest Cults of Rousseau?” in  Jesko Reiling and Daniel Tröhler, eds., Entre hétérogénéité et imagination. Pratiques de la réception de Jean-Jacques Rousseau. Genève: Éditions Slatkine (in the series Travaux sur la Suisse des Lumières (2013): 347-366

August 13: Paper presentation on “International Relations in a Community of Human Rights States,” 2013 Annual Meeting of the American Sociological Association, New York City

June 13-14: Paper presentation on “Developing Human Rights Commitment in Post Communist Societies through Education,” 2013 Russian Political Science Association, St. Petersburg, Russia

 

 

Weyland Podcast On Latin America’s Authoritarian Drift

Listen to Kurt Weyland, on the Journal of Deomcracy’s podcast, discuss his article on Latin America’s populist left and the drift toward authoritarianism:

http://www.journalofdemocracy.org/sites/default/files/media/JODPodcast-Kurt-Weyland.mp3

Read the article: http://www.journalofdemocracy.org/article/latin-america%E2%80%99s-authoritarian-drift-threat-populist-left

PS Article by David Leal

David Leal has published an artilce in PS: Political Science & Politics.

“Chapters, Volumes, Editors! Oh My! Reassessing the Role of Edited Volumes in the Social Sciences.”

Abstract: Many scholars discount the value of edited volumes and book chapters to the social science enterprise. Nevertheless, these unique formats advance scholarship, help faculty and graduate students achieve their goals, and enhance teaching and learning. This article therefore assesses the criticisms of volumes and chapters, reconsiders the contributions of these publications, and makes recommendations for improving their accessibility and status.

New Publications from Ben Gregg

Ben Gregg has a couple of new publications:

“Might the Noble Savage have Joined the Earliest Cults of Rousseau?” in  Jesko Reiling and Daniel Tröhler, eds., Entre hétérogénéité et imagination. Pratiques de la réception de Jean-Jacques Rousseau. Genève: Éditions Slatkine (in the series Travaux sur la Suisse des Lumières (2013): 347-366

“Teaching Human Rights in the College Classroom as a Cognitive Style,” in J. Shefner, H. Dahms, R. Jones, and A. Jalata, eds., Social Justice and the University, Basingstoke, United Kingdom: Palgrave (2013)

Weyland Article Compares 1848 and Arab Spring

Kurt Weyland’s article, “The Arab Spring: Why the Surprising Similarities with the Revolutionary Wave of 1848?” has been published in the December issue of Perspectives on Politics.

Abstract:

Prominent scholars have highlighted important similarities between the Arab Spring of 2011 and the “revolutions” of 1848: Both waves of contention swept with dramatic speed across whole regions, but ended up yielding rather limited advances toward political
liberalism and democracy. I seek to uncover the causal mechanisms that help account for these striking parallels. Drawing on my recent analysis of 1848, I argue that contention spread so quickly because many people in a wide range of countries drew rash
inferences from the downfall of Tunisia’s dictator. Applying cognitive heuristics that psychologists have documented, they overrated the significance of the Tunisian success, overestimated the similarities with the political situation in their own country, and jumped
to the conclusion that they could successfully challenge their own autocrats. This precipitation prompted protests in many settings that actually were much less propitious; therefore problems abounded. Cognitive shortcuts held such sway because Arab societies were weakly organized and repressed and thus lacked leaders from whom common people could take authoritative cues. The decision whether to engage in emulative contention fell to ordinary citizens, who—due to limited information access and scarce experience—were especially susceptible to the simple inferences suggested by cognitive heuristics.

Weyland Publishes New Article in Comparative Politics

Kurt Weyland’s article, “Diffusion Waves in European Democratization: The Impact of Organizational Development,” has been published in the October issue of Comparative Politics.

Abstract: Surprisingly, waves of political regime contention in Europe have slowed down through history, but have achieved more success in triggering advances toward democracy, as a comparison of the revolutions of 1848 and 1917/19 shows. To account for these inverse trends, I emphasize major organizational developments. Before political mass organizations had arisen, ordinary people decided whether to emulate foreign challenges to established autocrats. Short on information, citizens relied heavily on inferential shortcuts and acted rashly – with little success. After the rise of mass organizations, common people took cues from their representative leaders, who had more information and greater processing capacity. Before emulating an external precedent and challenging their ruler, leaders waited for propitious circumstances. Therefore, 20th century regime contention diffused more slowly yet with greater success.

Read more on our website.

Books by Faculty: Recent and Forthcoming

Zoltan Barany: The Soldier and the Changing State:  Building Democratic Armies in Africa, Asia, Europe, and the Americas

Jason Brownlee: Democracy Prevention: The Politics of the U.S.-Egyptian Alliance

Bruce Buchanan: Presidential Power and AccountabilityToward A Presidential Accountability System

Stephen Jessee: Ideology and Spatial Voting in American Elections

Rob Moser (with Ethan Scheiner): Electoral Systems and Political Context: How the Effects of Rules Vary Across New and Established Democracies

Ami PedahzurThe Triumph of Israel’s Radical Right

Recent and Forthcoming Publications from Ben Gregg

“Might the Noble Savage have Joined the Earliest Cults of Rousseau?” in  Jesko Reiling and Daniel Tröhler, eds., Rousseaus Feiern  Rousseaus feiern. Zur Rezeption von Jean-Jacques Rousseau seit dem 18. Jahrhundert. Genève: Éditions Slatkine (in the seriesTravaux sur la Suisse des Lumières) (forthcoming 2012)

“Abstracting from Human Bodies and National Boundaries via Electronically Mediated Communication: The Internet as Human Rights Resource,” Current Perspectives in Social Theory (forthcoming 2012)

“Comparative Perspectives on Social Integration in Pluralistic Societies: Thick Norms versus Thin,” Comparative Sociology 11:629-648

“Approaching Human Rights as a Cognitive Style in the College Classroom,” in J. Shefner, H. Dahms, R. Jones, and A. Jalata, eds., Social Justice and the University, Palgrave (forthcoming 2012)

Joint review of Human Rights and Memory by Daniel Levy and Natan Sznaider (Penn State University Press, 2010) and of Humanitarianism and Modern Culture by Keith Tester (Penn State University Press, 2010):Perspectives on Politics 10 (2) (June 2012): 456-458

“Genetic Enhancement: A New Dialectic of Enlightenment?” in Perspektiven der Aufklärung: Zwischen Mythos und Realität, ed. Dietmar Wetzel. Paderborn, Germany: Verlag Wilhelm Fink (2012): 133-146

Recent Faculty Books

J. Budziszewski, On The Meaning of Sex, Intercollegiate Studies Institute Books. (Budziszewski’s project on Thomas Aquinas’ Treatise on Law has recently been accepted by Cambridge University Press.)

Terri Givens (and Rahsaan Maxwell) eds., Immigrant Politics: Race and Representation in Western Europe, Lynne R ienner Publishers.

Benjamin Gregg, Human Rights as Social Construction, Cambridge University Press.

Patricia Maclachlan, The People’s Post Office: The History and Politics of the Japanese Postal System, 1871-2010, Harvard University Press.

Raúl Madrid, The Rise of Ethnic Politics in Latin America, Cambridge University Press.

Two Recent Articles from Ken Greene

Ken Greene recently published “The Latin American Left’s Mandate: Free-Market Policies and Issue Voting in New Democracies” in World Politics (with Andy Baker) and “Campaign Persuasion and Nascent Partisanship in Mexico’s New Democracy” is forthcoming the American Journal of Political Science.

Shaw Back in APSR

Daron Shaw has made it back to the American Political Science Review. Coauthored with Alan Gerber, James Gimpel and Donald Green, “How Large and Long-lasting Are the Persuasive Effects of Televised Campaign Ads? Results from a Randomized Field Experiment,” was published in the February issue.

Three Books from Galbraith

Jamie Galbraith’s book, Inequality and Instability: A Study of the World Economy Just Before the Great Crisis, has been accepted for publication by Oxford. He is also under contract to produce a new book, tentatively entitled One Crisis: How the World Economy Fell Apart for Free Press. Last year, the Library of America published John Kenneth Galbraith: The Affluent Society and Other Writings, 1952-1967; Galbraith was general editor.