Jennifer A Miller, PhD

Entries Tagged as 'GIS'

Congrats to Dr. Brendan Hoover

May 13th, 2020 · No Comments

Brendan Hoover successfully defended his dissertation (“Spatiotemporal Analysis of Animal Movement and Interactions”) on zoom May 1, followed by an even more successful zoom happy hour to celebrate with lab colleagues and alumni.

 

 

 

Tags: GIS · grad students · movement pattern analysis

Post-doc opportunity in SDM

February 5th, 2020 · No Comments

Opportunity: 1-3 years post-doctoral position using species distribution models to track movement of pollen. This opportunity will be in the Geography Department at UT-Austin but part of a collaborative project with the Biology Department at UT, Arizona State University, and Emory University.

Responsibilities: This (potentially) 5 year project is focused on forensic palynology (NYMPHS) The post-doc position will primarily be involved in developing models that incorporate ‘movement’ (dispersal, accessibility) and human impacts, in addition to biotic and abiotic factors (see figure 1) in order to model the distribution of pollen and pollinators. Ultimately, we are interested in developing a geocomputation toolbox that is capable of predicting the movement paths of forensic pollen samples over space and time.

Experience: Ideal candidates will have PhD in Geography, Ecology/Biology, or similar discipline with excellent statistical and data management skills. In particular, we are looking for candidates with extensive experience using R for species distribution models (preferably experience using BIOMOD2 or similar ensemble forecasting package). Additional experience and interest in pollen/pollinator networks, data science, and/or GIScience is preferred. Candidate should also have a strong publication record and ability to work in a collaborative research environment.

Location: The University of Texas at Austin, one of the biggest and best research universities in the world, is located in the dynamic capitol city of Austin, recently named the best place to live in America for the 2nd year in a row. The position will be in the Department of Geography and the Environment.

More information: Start date can be as soon as March 2020 (negotiable). To apply, please send a single .PDF document with your CV, cover letter outlining your relevant experience and when you could start, and names and contact information for three references.  For more information, contact Jennifer A Miller

Tags: GIS · species distribution models

New project on Forensic Palynology

April 8th, 2019 · No Comments

Jennifer is one of six PIs on a new MURI-funded project on ‘Multi-layer Network Modeling of Plant and Pollen Distribution across Space’ (NYMPHS). The purpose of this research program is to make forensic palynology via metabarcoding a key operational contributor to national security by equipping the DoD with a set of reliable, globally validated, easy-to-use geocomputational tools, mathematical models, and SDMs for geolocating pollen samples.

Tags: GIS · grad students · species distribution models

Book chapter on Tapir movement

January 28th, 2019 · No Comments

Jennifer and 2 of her former and current doctoral students (Cody Schank and Brendan Hoover, respectively) published a chapter on the impact of Hurricane Otto on Baird’s Tapir movement in Nicaragua in Movement Ecology of Neotropical Forest Mammals

Tags: GIS · grad students · movement pattern analysis · publication

New paper on Science of Movement in IJGIS

January 25th, 2019 · No Comments

Jennifer was a co-author on a new foresight paper with Harvey Miller, Somayeh Dodge, and Gil Bohrer: ‘Towards an integrated science of movement: converging research on animal movement ecology and human mobility science.” This paper was a result of two NSF-funded workshops on movement analysis in Nov. 2016 (UT-Austin) and May 2017 (OSU).

Tags: GIS · movement pattern analysis · publication

Jennifer invited to give seminar at University of Amsterdam

April 27th, 2018 · No Comments

I was invited to give a seminar at the Institute of Biodiversity and Ecosystem Dynamics (IBED) at the University of Amsterdam. The visit coincided with King’s Day, a national holiday to celebrate the King’s birthday.

Tags: conference · GIS · grad students · movement pattern analysis · spatial analysis · species distribution models

Special Issue on Spatial Ecology in IJGIS

November 15th, 2017 · No Comments

CFP for the 5th special issue on Spatial Ecology in International Journal of Geographical Information Science is announced.

Special Issue Editors:

Assoc Prof Jennifer Miller, University of Texas at Austin, USA;

Assoc Prof Shawn Laffan, University of NSW, Australia; 

Prof Andrew Skidmore, ITC, University of Twente, The Netherlands;

Prof Janet Franklin, University of California-Riverside, USA

A 5th special issue on spatial ecology has been approved by the Editors and Publisher of the International Journal of GIS. You are encouraged to submit relevant and high quality manuscripts for this special issue (see details below). This special issue continues the tradition of Spatial Ecology publications in the IJGIS.

For this special issue, we are seeking the submission of papers from ecological and related environmental studies, as well as more technical articles including topics such as spatial data infrastructure relevant to ecological applications. We are especially interested in special and novel ways of addressing spatial ecology questions, managing spatial ecological data, and advancing open science in spatial ecology.

Key words and topics for this special issue include scale, geovisualization, spatial data infrastructure for ecological (biodiversity) data, methods to derive ancillary data required for ecological modeling (climate, terrain, soils etc), animal movement including both spatial and temporal analysis, phenology, global databases for ecological studies (biodiversity, NPP, carbon etc), fragmentation and connectivity, biodiversity hotspots and endemism, physical vegetation structure for biomass assessment, palaeoecology and reconstructing past environments with respect to climate change, innovative methods and models for spatial ecological analysis, and open science and new directions for spatial ecology research. Applications across terrestrial, marine and atmospheric ecology are welcome. Relevant cross-over papers between GIS and remote sensing will also be considered.

The deadline for submission of papers is 15-July-2018. The anticipated publication date will be in 2019.

Papers are to be submitted via http://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/ijgis. Please choose ‘Special Issue Paper’ from the Manuscript Types field when doing so.

Tags: GIS · movement pattern analysis · spatial analysis · spatial scale · species distribution models

Jennifer presents research at Geocomputation conference

September 15th, 2017 · No Comments

Jennifer presented her work on “A computational movement analysis approach for modelling interactions between pairs of moving objects” at the 2017 Geocomputation conference in Leeds, UK. Paul Holloway (UT PhD ’16) also presented his work on “Individual-based modelling of species’ dynamic resource use.”

 

Lots of ham was eaten

Friends of Ham

Tags: conference · GIS · movement pattern analysis · spatial analysis

UT PhD (’16) Paul Holloway starts position at Cork

September 15th, 2017 · No Comments

Jennifer’s first PhD student, Paul Holloway, started his new position as a lecturer in the Geography department at University College Cork. Paul’s dissertation focused on incorporating movement in species distribution models and he had a post-doc in the Computer Science department at York University for a year immediately following his graduation.

Tags: GIS · grad students · teaching

Jennifer participates in Leiden workshop

August 25th, 2017 · No Comments

Jennifer was back in Europe for a Leiden workshop on Movement: New Sensors, New Data, New Challenges. Lorentz Center (Leiden, The Netherlands), August 21-25, 2017. Jennifer gave a keynote lecture on “Advances & Issues in Spatial Ecology (with applications & implications for Movement pattern analysis and computational movement analysis)”.

We all rented bikes and were able to bike to and from the workshop and to downtown Leiden. The end-of-workshop dinner was on the beach in Katwijk.

Tags: conference · GIS · movement pattern analysis