Research

The research produced by the network affiliates was presented at three meetings: at the University of California, Riverside on March 2,  2018, at the University of Wisconsin, Madison on June 21. 2018, and at a final meeting on Friday, February 8, 2019 at the University of Texas at Austin.

Below is a list of papers presented at these various meetings:

  • Brown, Michael. “Collision Courses: Velocity, Identity, and Motivational Beliefs in the Trajectory of Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math Majors.”
  • Chaturapruek, Tum, Monique Harrison and Marissa Thompson. “Sticking with STEM: Gender, Grades, and Persistence.”
  • Cohen, Emma D. “STEM Persistence in Institutional Context: The Role of Grit, Belonging, and Gender.”
  • Denice, Patrick. “Choosing and Changing Course: Postsecondary Students and the Process of Selecting a Major
  • Hao, Lingxin and Stephanie D’Souza. “STEM Major Initialization and Persistence: The Role of Precollege and College Factors.”
  • Ma, Yingyi. “Timing and Entry into STEM.”
  • Quadlin, Natasha. “From Major Preferences to Major Choices: Gender and Logics of Major Choice.”
  • Ro, Hyun Kyoung. “Who Expects to Go to Graduate School? Focusing on Self-Beliefs, Undergraduate Experiences, and Institutional Support and Barriers.”
  • Shandra, Carrie L. “The New Bottom Rung: Internships, Inequality, and the College-Career Transition.”

The research affiliates are presenting their research at professional conferences.  They have also submitted and will continue to submit their papers to peer-reviewed journals.   Several researchers currently have their papers are under review at peer-reviewed journals.  One researcher has a book in progress and another a dissertation in progress. Once the research papers have been presented at professional meetings or accepted for publication, they will be listed below.

Published articles:

  • Quadlin, Natasha. Published online on November 9, 2019 at doi:10.1177/0038040719887971 ” From Major Preferences to Major Choices: Gender and Logics of Major Choice”. Sociology of Education.
    https://doi.org/10.1177%2F003804071988797

Papers presented or soon to be presented at conferences:

  • Denice, Patrick. 2019. “Choosing and Changing Course: Postsecondary Students and the Process of Selecting a Major.” Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Sociological Association (ASA), August 13, 2019, New York, NY.
  • Harrison, Monique, Marissa Thompson and Tum Chaturapruek. 2019. “Sticking with STEM: Gender, Grades and the STEM Persistence Gap.” Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Sociological Association (ASA), August 11, 2019, New York, NY.
  • Ma, Yingyi. 2019. “What Inhibits Women’s Entry to STEM fields and What Could Change It?” Paper presented at the National Academy of Sciences’ Promising Practices for Improving the Inclusion of Women in Science, Engineering, and Medicine: Lessons from Kuwait and the United States Workshop.” October 28, 2019, Washington, DC.
  • Shandra, Carrie L. 2019. “Internship Course Credit: Challenges and Opportunities.” Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association (AERA), April 6, 2019, Toronto.
  • Shandra, Carrie L. 2019. “What Employers Want from Interns: Demand-Side Trends in the Internship Market.” Paper presented at the National Symposium on College Internship Research, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Madison, WI.

 

 

 

Suggested Template to Acknowledge the Network:

Research reported in this [publication/press release/presentation] was supported by the Pathways Through College Research Network funded by the National Science Foundation under grant numbers DUE 1317196 and DUE 1317206.  Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.

 

 

This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant Numbers 1317196 and 1317206. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.

 

 

 

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