Historian Emilio Zamora's Book Acknowledged as Best in Texas

zamora_claimingrights-195x300Historian Emilio Zamora has been named a fellow of the Texas State Historical Association (TSHA), in addition to winning its annual Coral Horton Tullis Memorial Prize for best book on Texas for his work “Claiming Rights and Righting Wrongs in Texas: Mexican Workers and Job Politics during World War II,” (Texas A&M University Press, 2009).

The award bears the name of the late Tullis (UT alumnas, B.A. ’24 and M.A. ‘27), who was one of the first women on faculty in the History Department.

In addition, The Texas Institute of Letters presented him with its Scholarly Book Award this spring. Zamora brings focus to his study with the overarching argument that wartime concerns in Mexico-U.S. relations raised the issue of race to a hemispheric level of importance and encouraged Mexican workers to continue their call for equal rights. It will remain relevant to scholars and policy makers in the present as questions about immigrant labor, Mexican Americans, Mexico-U.S. relations and discrimination continue to draw our attention.

Historian Emilio Zamora’s Book Acknowledged as Best in Texas

zamora_claimingrights-195x300Historian Emilio Zamora has been named a fellow of the Texas State Historical Association (TSHA), in addition to winning its annual Coral Horton Tullis Memorial Prize for best book on Texas for his work “Claiming Rights and Righting Wrongs in Texas: Mexican Workers and Job Politics during World War II,” (Texas A&M University Press, 2009).

The award bears the name of the late Tullis (UT alumnas, B.A. ’24 and M.A. ‘27), who was one of the first women on faculty in the History Department.

In addition, The Texas Institute of Letters presented him with its Scholarly Book Award this spring. Zamora brings focus to his study with the overarching argument that wartime concerns in Mexico-U.S. relations raised the issue of race to a hemispheric level of importance and encouraged Mexican workers to continue their call for equal rights. It will remain relevant to scholars and policy makers in the present as questions about immigrant labor, Mexican Americans, Mexico-U.S. relations and discrimination continue to draw our attention.

Celebrated Cookbook Author Serves Up Stories of Mexico’s Culinary Heritage

oaxaDiana Kennedy, known by many as the “Julia Child of Mexican Cuisine,” will discuss the history of Mexican cooking on Thursday, April, 29, 6 p.m., at the Blanton Museum of Art, as part of the Mexican Center’s “Foodways of Mexico” speaker series.

From recipes shared between mothers and daughters to village feasts in which the entire community prepares the meal, Mexico has a rich food tradition. With her profound knowledge of the culture, Kennedy will discuss the dishes and recipes of Mexico that are handed down from generation to generation.

With a zest for adventure and a passion for Mexican culture, foodKennedy spent more than 30 years traveling to the farthest reaches of her adopted homeland to track down authentic recipes.

Stories from her travels along with a wide assortment of recipes are documented in her classic cookbooks, which include “The Cuisines of Mexico” and “The Art of Mexican Cooking.” She received the highest honor given to foreigners by the Mexican government, the Order of the Aztec Eagle, as well as numerous awards from gastronomic institutions throughout the world. Her latest book, “Oaxaca al Gusto: An Infinite Gastronomy” will be published in September 2010 by the University of Texas Press.

Mexican Center Hosts Distinguished Authors

460941Distinguished Mexican writers Héctor Aguilar Camín and Ángeles Mastretta will speak Thursday, March 25, as part of the Mexican Center’s “Many Mexicos” series.

One of Mexico’s foremost intellectuals, Héctor Aguilar Camín is a journalist, historian and writer, or, as he puts it, “ a historian by accident and novelist by vocation.” Born in 1946, Aguilar Camín has been a Guggenheim scholar and editor of NEXOS, one of Mexico’s leading cultural magazines. Some of his most renowned novels are “La frontera nómada” (1977), “Morir en el Golfo” (1985) and “El error de la luna” (1995). “A la sombra de la Revolución Mexicana,” his 1991 collaboration with Lorenzo Meyer, was published in the Teresa Lozano Long Institute of Latin American Studies (LLILAS) Translations from Latin America Series as “In the Shadow of the Mexican Revolution” and was honored as an alternate selection by the History Book Club.

Aguilar Camín will explore the history of Mexican politics in his talk “Actualidad del pasado: Reflexiones sobre doscientos años de cambios y costumbres políticas de México” (The Past as Present: Reflections on 200 Years of Political Practices and Change in Mexico). The presentation—given in Spanish with simultaneous translation provided—will be held 4 to 5 p.m., Thursday, March 25, in the Sinclair Suite at the Texas Union (UNB 3.128).

Ángeles Mastretta is one of Mexico’s leading literary figures, a prize-winning novelist and journalist whose 1985 novel “Arráncame la vida” was a stunning critical and popular success in Mexico. As a young writer, she studied with authors Juan Rulfo and Salvador Elizondo and wrote as a columnist for various newspapers before publishing “Arráncame,” the story of a young woman who grows up in Puebla in the unsettled world of post-Revolutionary Mexico. A special screening of the film based on the book, will be held at the Paramount Theatre at 8 p.m., March 25. Mastretta will hold a Q&A session following the movie. For more information and tickets, visit Cine Las Américas.