Category Archives: Visual Resources Collection

Capturing Construction: Historic Images of Seattle’s Space Needle

Workers stand inside the Space Needle’s restaurant level, circa January 1962. (George Gulacsik / Courtesy of The Seattle Public Library)

Workers stand inside the Space Needle’s restaurant level, c. January 1962. (George Gulacsik / Courtesy of Seattle Public Library)

The Seattle Public Library is now the repository for 2,400 never-before-displayed photographs of the construction of Seattle, Washington’s iconic Space Needle. The unique collection chronicles the construction process from pouring the foundation to the placing of glazing in the restaurant. The collection offers an intimate view into the implementation of an engineering and design wonder.

Source: The Seattle Times

Urban Instagrammers

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Instagram—currently numbering over 300 million users—has become a revolutionary medium for wide-scale image sharing for amateur photographers. The Guardian has done all city lovers and Instagram fans a favor by creating a list of the best urban Instagrammers in the United States. The list highlights a diversity of visions, locations, and aspects of a city captured by Instagrammers.

To see what students, alums, and faculty of The University of Texas at Austin’s School of Architecture have been documenting during their research travel, check out the Visual Resources Collection’s Instagram.

Source: The Guardian

Spring 2015 Exhibition Opening | Restoring Cultural Monuments: Oaxaca, Mexico

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The images on display document restoration projects of the Open Chapel at Teposcolula (1995-1999) and Santo Domingo de Guzmán Monastery (1994- 2000).

Join us for the opening of the School of Architecture Visual Resources Collection’s Spring 2015 exhibition “Restoring Cultural Monuments: Oaxaca, Mexico.” Assistant Professor
Benjamin Ibarra Sevilla contributed to the VRC’s collection the images featured in this exhibition documenting the restoration of Santo Domingo de Guzmán and the Open Chapel of Teposcolula in Oaxaca, Mexico.

WHEN: February 17, 2015 from 2-4 pm
WHERE: VRC, Sutton 3.128

Refreshments will be served.

Image Source: School of Architecture Visual Resources Collection

Tomorrow! Fall Exhibit Opening: Focus on Interiors

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The VRC invites you to celebrate our fall 2013 exhibit, Focus on Interiors: A Tapestry of Images. This year, the Interior Design Program celebrates 101 years at the University of Texas. With that rich history in mind, this exhibit features images from the VRC’s online image collection that highlight the varied interiors and furniture that have spanned the century.

Tomorrow, join us for the exhibit opening,Thursday, September 26th!

DATE: September 26, 2013
TIME: 3-5 pm
WHERE: VRC, Sutton 3.128

Refreshments will be served.

Image Source: VRC

Fall 2013 Exhibit Opening: Focus on Interiors

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The School of Architecture Visual Resources Collection (VRC) invites you to celebrate our fall 2013 exhibit, Focus on Interiors: A Tapestry of Images. This year, the Interior Design Program celebrates 101 years at The University of Texas at Austin. With that rich history in mind, this exhibit features images from the VRC’s online image collection that highlight the varied interiors and furniture that have spanned the century.

Join us for the Exhibit Opening, next Thursday, September 26th!

DATE: September 26, 2013
TIME: 3-5 pm
WHERE: VRC, Sutton 3.128

Refreshments will be served.

Image Source: VRC

Focus on Brazil: The Church of St. Francis

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Pampulha is an engineered lake punctuated by a series of buildings in Belo Horizonte, Brazil. The buildings were designed by Oscar Niemeyer, who was commissioned by Juscelino Kubitschek when he was mayor of Belo Horizonte in the 1940s. According to Andreoli and Forti, with the Pampulha complex, Niemeyer was the first to articulate Brazil’s nascent modern architecture vocabulary that would go on to shape the design of Brasilia in the late 1950s.

This image is of the Church of St. Francis, inaugurated in 1940. The load-bearing concrete vaults are met by a vertical plane of Candido Portinari’s mosaic panel, demonstrating the hybridity of Brazilian modernism. Drawing from Corbusier to Brazilian Baroque churches to colonial Portuguese tile painting, the Church of St. Francis was one of the first structures to express how plural influences paved the way for unique future synergies seen in the Ibirapuera Park in São Paulo (early 1950s) and Brasilia (late 1950s).

See: Andreoli, Elisabetta and Adrian Forty (2004) Brazil’s Modern Architecture, New York: Phaidon Press.

Find images of this project by searching the VRC’s online image collection using the search terms “Chapel” in the Subject field and “Belo Horizonte” in the City field.

Photograph by Kristine Stiphany, courtesy UTSOA Visual Resources Collection

Focus on Brazil: The Roof Structure at Ibirapuera Park

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The roof structure at the Ibirapuera Park was designed by Oscar Niemeyer in 1953 as an open-air passageway between the Bienale Pavilions. Floating sinuously above a concrete walkway punctuated by openings for lush vegetation, the structure has supported ad hoc activities over the course of its nearly sixty years of existence, from protests and governmental functions to street vending and skateboarding.

In distinction to contemporary parks designed for particular functions on the ground plane, the Ibirapuera roof structure project employs the roof plane to unite users, who in turn determined its function.

Find images of this project by searching the VRC’s online image collection using the search terms “Ibirapuera Skate” in the Subject field and “Sao Paulo” in the City field.

Photograph by Kristine Stiphany, courtesy UTSOA Visual Resources Collection

 

Focus on Brazil: The Museu Afro Brasil

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The Afro-Brasil Museum (Manoel da Nóbrega Pavilion), is located in São Paulo’s Ibirapuera Park. The building was designed by Oscar Niemeyer, and opened in late 1953 in celebration of São Paulo’s 400th anniversary. The design exemplified a number of Le Corbusier’s Five Points of Architecture, including the use of pilotis, free plan, and the separation of the facade from the building’s structure. In the 1960s, the main level’s open continuity between the interior and the park was enclosed with glazing. The building’s 110,000 square foot interior was renovated in 2004 by Brasil Arquitetura to celebrate Brazil’s African cultural heritage. Toward this end, the museum accommodates a range of cultural programs and events that engage the community, including courses, seminars, lectures, workshops and school visitation programs. The museum contains over 3,000 items devoted to African influence and importance in Brazil’s cultural heritage; the collection includes a range of artifacts, from tribal icons to contemporary artworks.

Find images of this project by searching the VRC’s online image collection using the search terms “AfroBrasil” in the Subject field and “Sao Paulo” in the City field.

Photograph by Kristine Stiphany, courtesy UTSOA Visual Resources Collection

Focus on Brazil: The Conjunto Nacional Building

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Sao Paulo’s Conjunto Nacional Building was designed by David Libeskind and opened in 1956. Located on Paulista Avenue, the city’s most prominent boulevard of commerce, culture and public space, the Conjunto was one of Sao Paulo’s first modern buildings with a mixed-use program.

The Conjunto is divided into two primary volumes: a vertical tower housing office spaces and residences and, at the street level, a commercial center that includes a Liviaria Cultura bookstore, Cinema and a host of restaurants and small stores. The roof of the commercial center is occupiable and contains two penthouse structures, one of which was occupied until 1968 by the Fasano restaurant known for its infamous dancing dinners. Like the galleries in Central Sao Paulo, the Conjunto Nacional reconfigures the massive street block through a series of internal pedestrian passages paved with black and white Portuguese tiles, merging Brazil’s colonial past and modern future.

Find images of this project by searching the VRC’s online image collection using the search terms “Conjunto Nacional” in the Subject field and “Sao Paulo” in the City field.

Photograph by Kristine Stiphany, courtesy UTSOA Visual Resources Collection

Focus on Brazil: The Musem of Contemporary Art

 

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The Museum of Contemporary Art was designed by Oscar Niemeyer and inaugurated in 1996. Perched on a peninsular cliff in Niteroi, the museum affords spectacular views across the Guanabara Bay to Rio de Janeiro.

Primary exhibition spaces are located within a circular volume that looms above a reflection pool within a vast open plaza, linked by a sinuous entrance ramp paved with red carpet. While the outer corridor of the volume affords 360 degree views around the building, a series of inner circular galleries display the work of contemporary Brazilian and international artists. Underground programs of an auditorium and restaurant serve as subterranean departures from the otherworldly experience of the circular volume, the two realms offering complementary but distinct experiences of a singular project.

Find images of this project by searching the VRC’s online image collection using the search terms “Museum of Contemporary Art” in the Subject field and “Rio de Janeiro” in the City field.

Photograph by Kristine Stiphany, courtesy UTSOA Visual Resources Collection

Focus on Brazil: The Guaimbé Building

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The Guaimbé Building in São Paulo, Brazil was designed by Paulo Mendes da Rocha and J. de Gennaro and completed in 1962. As the city’s first Brutalist style residential building, the Guaimbé was a key project for distinguishing the Paulista School of architecture (São Paulo) from that of the Carioca School (Rio de Janeiro), whose roots can be traced to the International Style.

Situated on a long and narrow site, the building has fourteen floors, each floor with one unit. Utilizing the concept of a gallery plan, spaces are interlocked around three curvilinear walls that delineate dining, bathroom, powder room and master suite shower. To ensure that the interior spaces would always receive light, the tower maintains significant distance from the site’s frontal and lateral limits.

Find images of this project by searching the VRC’s online image collection using the search terms “Guaimbe” in the Subject field and “São Paulo” in the City field.

Photograph by Kristine Stiphany, courtesy UTSOA Visual Resources Collection

Focus on Brazil: The Miguel Rio Branco Gallery

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The Miguel Rio Branco gallery was designed between 2008 and 2010 by the office of Arquitetos Associados in Minas Gerais, Brazil. It is one of several galleries located in the Inhotim Sculpture Park whereby architects are charged with designing appropriate gallery space for artists chosen for permanent exhibition.

The project is inspired by an image taken by the artist of a large boulder in the landscape. To yield a sense that the cor-ten structure is looming above the lush Brazilian forest, the entry level is buried into a hill and concealed, initiating a gallery tour through cavernous spaces emphasizing Rio Branco’s haunting images of street life, poverty, and the often unexpected plight of people living in Brazil today. Introspective in nature, the Miguel Rio Branco gallery approximates the user to the country’s darker side, provoking a reconsideration of how architecture and art have a shared social purpose to subtly reveal the simultaneous exuberance and decay that characterize present day Brazil.

Find images of this project by searching the VRC’s online image collection using the search terms “Inhotim” in the Subject field and “Brumadinho” in the City field.

Photograph by Kristine Stiphany, courtesy UTSOA Visual Resources Collection