People

Professor Blair Johnson

Dr. Blair Johnson performs experimental research to model turbulence-driven environmental flows.  She grew up in Baltimore, MD, where annual summer trips to Ocean City, MD inspired her fascination with waves and sand.  Although she originally planned to become a structural engineer, undergraduate coastal engineering research introduced her to fluid mechanics and phenomena such as turbulent diffusion and coastal erosion.  Dr. Johnson completed her B.S. at Johns Hopkins University in Civil Engineering with a concentration in Structures, and a minor in Piano at the Peabody Conservatory of Music in 2008.  Following completion of her M.S. in Civil and Environmental Engineering at Cornell University (2011), she was a visiting researcher at the Instituto de Hidráulica Ambiental (IH Cantabria) in Santander, Spain, in 2012.  Dr. Johnson completed her Ph.D. in Environmental Fluid Mechanics and Hydrology at Cornell University in August 2016.  She worked as a Postdoctoral Research Associate in the Laboratory of Energetic Flow and Turbulence at Arizona State University from 2016 to 2017.

Graduate Students

Aubrey McCutchan, Ph.D. Candidate

Aubrey studies the effect of turbulence on ice melting rates. This knowledge will be used in ice melting models to obtain more accurate rates of sea level rise. In her free time, she enjoys outdoor activities such as hiking and horseback riding. Aubrey has a B.S. (2018) in Civil Engineering from Oklahoma State University.

Arefe Ghazi, Ph.D. Candidate

Arefe is studying the Mixing of desalination brine plumes in homogeneous isotropic turbulence. She studied her master’s in Sharif University of Technology working on the numerical modeling of a two-layered flow. She is interested in the fundamental environmental flow processes.  In her spare time, she is busy doing puzzles and going to the gym.

James Holyoke, M.S. Student

James is interested in environmental fluid mechanics, and he will specifically be focused on understanding the impacts of flooding and their relationships to roadway safety. Additionally, he hopes to research image processing for use in studying environmental flows related to turbulence and sediment transport.  James enjoys playing and watching any sports, and he loves to exercise both his mind and body by either working out or learning about investing strategies. James attended University of Delaware, where he obtained an honors Bachelor of Civil Engineering with distinction and discovered his passion for water by researching at the Center for Applied Coastal Research.

Po-Chen Chen, Ph.D. Student

Po-Chen is interested in turbulent transport processes within the environment, such as pollutants or sediments. He obtained his B.S. and M.S. from National Taiwan University. In his spare time, he enjoys biking, playing soccer, and traveling.

JETlab Alumni!

*with first job after graduation listed

May 2019:

  • Joel (Junior) Lagade, Jr., M.S., Black & Veatch
  • Yongsik Kim, Ph.D. (co-supervised with Ben Hodges), K-water

December 2019:

  • Luisa Florez, M.S., B.P.
  • Andrew Jaeger, M.S., U.S. Coast Guard

May 2020:

  • Greg Hendrickson, M.S., Ph.D. student w/ Lina Sela at UT Austin
  • Hannah Knaup, M.S., Exxon
  • Aubrey McCutchan, M.S., Ph.D. student in JETlab!

August 2021:

  • Julio Chavez, M.S., Ph.D. student with Michelle DiBenedetto at U Washington
Join our group!

We are currently seeking M.S. and Ph.D. students to join the laboratory!  It is recommended that incoming students have a background in engineering (civil, environmental, mechanical, or aerospace) or geophysics, though students from other disciplines are encouraged to apply as well.  Incoming doctoral students preferably have a foundation in graduate level fluid mechanics and laboratory experience.  Incoming M.S. students should come prepared with an excitement and curiosity for laboratory work in environmental fluid mechanics.  All students should have a strong background in mathematics and competency in programming.  If you’d like to send an email to inquire about future openings, please describe how your interests are relevant to the work happening in the lab and what your goals would be at the University of Texas.

Undergraduate students are also encouraged to assist in laboratory research, no experience necessary.  Please keep in mind most of our work happens at the Pickle campus.  If interested, please send an email to blairjohnson [at] utexas [dot] edu to inquire about possible positions.