Author: Molly Ellsworth
Molly Ellsworth is a first-year graduate student at the LBJ School of Public Affairs. She graduated from Carleton College in 2016 with a degree in environmental science and a specialization in conservation and development. Her studies are focused on environmental policy, particularly in air quality, climate change mitigation, and climate adaptation planning. Her prior work experience includes Adaptation International, the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality, and the Wisconsin State Legislature. Recent projects include; The City of San Antonio Sustainability Plan’s Vulnerability Assessment and the Shoshone Bannock Tribes Climate Change Vulnerability Assessment and Adaptation Plan.

Neural Networks for Object Recognition and Disaster Planning

Convolutional Neural Networks (CNNs) are neural networks that can process images and identify objects within them. Although these methods of machine learning have been around for a long time, it was only within the past 10 years that the error

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Modeling and Protecting Freshwater Resources for Disaster Resilience

In 2016, a drought on the Marshall Islands caused over 16,000 people to suffer from extreme water shortages. The government declared a state of emergency well after freshwater wells had already been contaminated by seawater, leaving thousands to drink from

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Shrinking Shores? – Ocean Dynamics and Customizing Adaptation Plans

When it comes to climate vulnerability, one group of people will be particularly challenged: those living on low-lying islands, especially atolls. There’s frequently news about how quickly climate change will necessitate relocation or resettlement but it often focuses on the

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Bathymetry Data Collection: Historical Challenges and New Developments

image of a plane and lidar data

In May of 2019, the Tuvalu Coastal Adaptation Project (TCAP), in partnership with the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), contracted the company Furgo to conduct an airborne LIDAR survey across nine of Tuvalu’s atoll islands. The purpose of this survey

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