Jennifer A Miller, PhD

Entries Tagged as 'spatial analysis'

Jennifer invited to give seminar at University of Amsterdam

April 27th, 2018 · No Comments

I was invited to give a seminar at the Institute of Biodiversity and Ecosystem Dynamics (IBED) at the University of Amsterdam. The visit coincided with King’s Day, a national holiday to celebrate the King’s birthday.

Tags: conference · GIS · grad students · movement pattern analysis · spatial analysis · species distribution models

Special Issue on Spatial Ecology in IJGIS

November 15th, 2017 · No Comments

CFP for the 5th special issue on Spatial Ecology in International Journal of Geographical Information Science is announced.

Special Issue Editors:

Assoc Prof Jennifer Miller, University of Texas at Austin, USA;

Assoc Prof Shawn Laffan, University of NSW, Australia; 

Prof Andrew Skidmore, ITC, University of Twente, The Netherlands;

Prof Janet Franklin, University of California-Riverside, USA

A 5th special issue on spatial ecology has been approved by the Editors and Publisher of the International Journal of GIS. You are encouraged to submit relevant and high quality manuscripts for this special issue (see details below). This special issue continues the tradition of Spatial Ecology publications in the IJGIS.

For this special issue, we are seeking the submission of papers from ecological and related environmental studies, as well as more technical articles including topics such as spatial data infrastructure relevant to ecological applications. We are especially interested in special and novel ways of addressing spatial ecology questions, managing spatial ecological data, and advancing open science in spatial ecology.

Key words and topics for this special issue include scale, geovisualization, spatial data infrastructure for ecological (biodiversity) data, methods to derive ancillary data required for ecological modeling (climate, terrain, soils etc), animal movement including both spatial and temporal analysis, phenology, global databases for ecological studies (biodiversity, NPP, carbon etc), fragmentation and connectivity, biodiversity hotspots and endemism, physical vegetation structure for biomass assessment, palaeoecology and reconstructing past environments with respect to climate change, innovative methods and models for spatial ecological analysis, and open science and new directions for spatial ecology research. Applications across terrestrial, marine and atmospheric ecology are welcome. Relevant cross-over papers between GIS and remote sensing will also be considered.

The deadline for submission of papers is 15-July-2018. The anticipated publication date will be in 2019.

Papers are to be submitted via http://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/ijgis. Please choose ‘Special Issue Paper’ from the Manuscript Types field when doing so.

Tags: GIS · movement pattern analysis · spatial analysis · spatial scale · species distribution models

Jennifer presents research at Geocomputation conference

September 15th, 2017 · No Comments

Jennifer presented her work on “A computational movement analysis approach for modelling interactions between pairs of moving objects” at the 2017 Geocomputation conference in Leeds, UK. Paul Holloway (UT PhD ’16) also presented his work on “Individual-based modelling of species’ dynamic resource use.”

 

Lots of ham was eaten

Friends of Ham

Tags: conference · GIS · movement pattern analysis · spatial analysis

Research collaboration with AIMS continues

March 31st, 2017 · No Comments

Jennifer spent several weeks back in Perth, Western Australia continuing a collaboration with Drs. Ben Radford and Marji Puotinen at the Australia Institute of Marine Science. They focused on using geographically weighted regression to explore spatial accuracy of models of mixed benthos assemblages in the Northern Kimberley region and were able to squeeze in a writing retreat on Rottnest Island.

Tags: GIS · spatial analysis · spatial scale · species distribution models

Modeling interactions workshop at UT

November 13th, 2016 · No Comments

I co-organized (along with Harvey Miller and Gil Bohrer from Ohio State) a workshop on Modeling interactions as part of a two workshop series focused on addressing issues in computational movement analysis. The workshops are intended
to draw participants from both the human movement/mobility and animal movement ecology fields.

The interaction workshop was held at UT-Austin Nov. 10-11, 2016. We had about 30 participants and 3 great keynotes from Francesca Cagnacci, Patrick Laube, and Jed Long. More information is here.

The 2nd workshop will be held at Ohio State May 10-11, 2017. More information is here.

Workshop participants

Workshop participants

Tags: conference · GIS · movement pattern analysis · spatial analysis

New project on exploring anonymity in movement trajectories

June 8th, 2015 · No Comments

Dr. Jennifer Miller has received funding from UT’s Center for Identity for a new project that explores how anonymous  movement trajectories are based on GPS locations from smartphones. Location data are often released after they have been ‘anonymized’—which means that the trajectory has been stripped of any obvious

Microsoft GeoLife trajectories in Beijing

Microsoft GeoLife trajectories in Beijing 

identifying information such as name, address, phone number, etc. However, personal points of interest (home, work) can be easily identified by mining trajectory data for movement patterns, and these points of interest are often associated with unique individuals. This project will explore privacy issues associated with smartphone location data using a computational movement analysis framework.

 

Tags: GIS · movement pattern analysis · privacy · spatial analysis

New project on analyzing animal interactions using GPS data

August 25th, 2014 · No Comments

I just received a three year grant to support research on developing a framework for analyzing dynamic interactions between animals using GPS data (NSF #1424920). I’m looking for a graduate student (preferably doctoral) to work on the project starting fall 2015. Student should have a GIScience and/or ecology background and be very comfortable with spatial analysis and modeling. Must have very strong R skills and preferably some python programming experience as well.

di_hy

If you are a potential graduate student interested in working on this project, please see general information about our graduate program here and more specific information about working with me here.

Tags: GIS · grad students · movement pattern analysis · spatial analysis

PiPG Progress Report

February 24th, 2014 · No Comments

Another SDM-related progress report in Progress in Physical Geography is coming out. This one is on the use of simulated data to assess models.

Tags: GIS · publication · simulated data · spatial analysis · species distribution models