Lang. Training: Russian Pronunciation Master Class

Deadline: February 18, 2021

For all Russian language learners: Master Class in Russian pronunciation is being offered this spring. Our mission: to learn to sound authentically Russian! It is a free six-session class held via Zoom.

Appropriate for:
all students and teachers of Russian
beginners who know the alphabet
students with experience (a little or a lot!)
adult professional non-native speakers who want to improve their pronunciation
Russian teachers who want to expand their repertoire for teaching pronunciation

Level of instruction is aimed at:
college students
grad students
adult professionals
advanced high school students age 16+

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Resource: Open-Access Russian Textbook

Decoding the 1920s: A Reader for Advanced Learners of Russian

The materials presented in this book were developed for an advanced-level content-based Russian language course at Portland State University entitled “Russian Literature of the Twentieth Century: The 1920s.” Literature of this period is a major part of the Russian canon, but is notoriously difficult for learners of Russian to read in the original, due both to its stylistic complexity and the relative obscurity of its historical, political, and cultural references. And yet, this decade is crucial for understanding Russia – not only in the Soviet period, but also today. This was the period, when Mikhail Zoshchenko, Isaak Babel, Mikhail Bulgakov, and Andrei Platonov meticulously documented the birth of the “New Soviet Man,” his “newspeak” and Soviet bureaucratese; when Alexandra Kollontai, a Marxist revolutionary and a diplomat, wrote essays and fiction on the “New Soviet Woman”; when numerous satirical works were created; when Babel experimented with a literary representation of dialects (e.g.,Odessa Russian or Jewish Russian). These varieties of language have not disappeared. Bureaucrats still use some form of bureaucratese. Numerous contemporary TV shows imitate the dialects that Babel described. Moreover, Bulgakov’s “Heart of a Dog” gave rise, due largely to its film adaptation, to catch-phrases that still appear throughout contemporary Russian media, satirical contexts, and everyday conversation. Thus, the Russian literature of the 1920s does not belong exclusively to the past, but has relevance and interpretive power for the present, and language learners who wish to pursue a career in humanities, media analysis, analytical translation, journalism, or international relations must understand this period and the linguistic patterns it established.

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Scholarships to learn Russian, Persian and Armenian

Deadlines in February, March, and April

Several Scholarships are available to learn Russian, Persian, and Armenian during the ASPIRANTUM summer schools in Yerevan

Russian Language Summer School 2021 – https://aspirantum.com/courses/russian-language-summer-school-04-july-24-july-2021-yerevan-armenia

Dostoyevsky Scholarships to Learn Russian – https://aspirantum.com/scholarships/dostoyevsky-grants-to-learn-russian

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Funding: Language Teaching and Learning Research Grants (SLI, University of Pittsburgh)

Deadline: February 10, 2021

The Center for Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies (REEES) at the University of Pittsburgh will award up to two Language Teaching and Learning Research (LTLR) grants for scholars to conduct research projects on-site or remotely at Pitt’s Slavic, East European, and Near Eastern Summer Language Institute (SLI) in June–July 2021. Funded projects must focus on the teaching and learning of one or more of the following priority languages: Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian, Polish, Russian, Turkish, and Ukrainian. Other languages that are taught at the SLI may be included in a project proposal in addition to these priority languages; see sli.pitt.edu for the complete list of language courses offered.

Applicants may propose to be in residence in Pittsburgh for all or a portion of the two-month duration of the SLI, according to the needs of their projects. However, please note that applicants should be prepared to conduct their projects entirely remotely in the event that pandemic conditions prevent the 2021 SLI from offering in-person instruction, and/or if University of Pittsburgh restrictions on non-essential travel prohibit the use of grant funds to cover travel expenses in Summer 2021.

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Title VIII Funding for Intensive Language Study (Arizona State University)

Deadline: January 25, 2021

I wanted to send a final reminder regarding the opportunity for current and incoming graduate students to apply for Title VIII funding for intensive language study at ASU’s Critical Languages Institute (CLI).

The Department of State’s Title VIII program funds graduate students with U.S. citizenship to study the less commonly taught languages of Eastern Europe and the Former Soviet Union. ASU’s Critical Language’s Institute will welcome our 8th cohort of Title VIII Fellows in summer 2021. If you are a current or incoming graduate student who would benefit from language training and Title VIII funding, we hope to hear from you! If you know any graduate students who might benefit from our program, we hope that you share this information with them!

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ROTC Scholarship for Project GO (Global Officers) Intensive Russian Study (University of Pittsburgh)

Deadline: January 13, 2021; February 17, 2021

The University of Pittsburgh invites Army, Navy/Marine, and Air Force ROTC students from any US college or university to apply for a Pitt Project GO (Global Officers) scholarship for intensive study of 1st-4th year Russian in Summer 2021. Project GO is an initiative sponsored by the Defense Language and National Security Education Office (DLNSEO) and administered by the Institute of International Education (IIE).

Students who have not yet begun their pursuit of Russian are encouraged to apply for an 8-week beginning-level class, which will cover the equivalent of one academic year’s worth of language training. The beginning-level classes, offered by Pitt’s Summer Language Institute (SLI), are held at the University’s main campus in the Oakland neighborhood of Pittsburgh from June 7–July 30, 2021. Pitt Project GO scholarships for Beginning Russian cover:

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Language courses at the Central Eurasian Studies Summer Institute (University of Wisconsin)

Deadline: February 1, 2021

Greetings from the Central Eurasian Studies Summer Institute (CESSI)!

We are excited to announce that applications to CESSI are now open! CESSI typically offers courses in Kazakh, Tajik, Uyghur, and Uzbek. Additional Central Eurasian languages (such as Azerbaijani or Kyrgyz) may be added with sufficient student interest.

Several funding opportunities exist for undergraduate and graduate students, researchers, and working professionals. Graduate students (including incoming students), post-baccalaureate researchers, and professionals who are U.S. citizens are especially encouraged to apply for the Title VIII fellowship, which covers full tuition plus a stipend of $2,500 for the summer.  Note: this is a great opportunity for incoming MA and PhD students to develop language skills before embarking on fieldwork.

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Online Courses and Workshops: Russian Classics, Ukrainian Identity, Language (SRAS)

Deadline: Varies

Reading the Russian Classics with SRAS

Join SRAS for a new look at the Russian classics. Each course will look at a major work from five of Russia’s most famous authors. We will present the author’s biography and the history of the book’s creation, and then over the course of four meetings reference excerpts to discuss plot, character, and important themes to the work. We will also take a virtual excursion to a location in Russia of relevance to the work, its author, and its history to learn still more.

Educators: If you are teaching a Russian literature course this spring, contact us about participating in the virtual excursion components of these courses.

Perspectives on Ukrainian Identity

Perspectives on Ukrainian Identity is a multidimensional look at the people and events which have shaped Ukrainian identity. Starting from a broad introduction to Ukrainian history, we then move to four focused events – both tragic and heroic – that have had an outsized influence on modern Ukrainian identity. We will come to understand the geography, history, politics, and geopolitics of this large and fascinating country. We combine lecture, “live” visits to sites of relevance, and panel discussions with Ukrainian students as they reflect on their own history and identity.

Apply the full cost of this course to study abroad in Kyiv in 2021!

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American English Program Teaching Positions / Intensive Russian Language Program (American Home, Russia)

Deadline: March 1, 2021

1) American English Program Teaching Positions – Application Deadline March 1, 2021 (NEW WEBSITE: http://www.ah33.ru/teach-english/)

The American English Program has been helping Vladimir residents to learn English since 1992 and currently has more than 600 students each semester who are taught by a group of American and Russian teachers.

PROGRAM BENEFITS: monthly stipend, room and board, three hours per week of one-to-one Russian lessons with faculty trained to teach Russian as a foreign language, thorough teacher orientation and ongoing teaching support from 2 full-time teacher trainers, textbooks customized specifically for our program, a pleasant and well-equipped teaching environment, full Russian visa application support, complete on-site administrative support from an excellent Russian staff, and much more.

TEACHER OBLIGATIONS: Plan and teach four (possibly 5) 1½ hour classes that meet twice a week, hold office hours, present a brief “Saturday lecture” on an aspect of American culture, airfare to and from Moscow, visa fee, TESOL certification.

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