2022 Danyliw Seminar on Ukraine Call for Proposals

Deadline: June 30, 2022

After a two-year pause due to the pandemic, the Danyliw Research Seminar on Contemporary Ukraine will be back in person on 13-15 October 2022. The Seminar is hosted by the Chair of Ukrainian Studies at the University of Ottawa with the support of the Danyliw Foundation in Toronto.

Since 2005, the Danyliw Seminar has provided an annual platform for the presentation of some of the most influential academic research on Ukraine — from scholars, including doctoral students, based in Ukraine, the rest of Europe, the United States, Canada, or anywhere in the world. The 2022 Seminar will be in-person only.

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CFP: JIS Symposium 2022: “The American Century & Its Challenges: U.S., Russia, China”

Deadline: June 1, 2022

Pasadena, California, 30 July 2022
(Zoom)
Suggested Themes:
It is by now legendary that the 20th century was “the American Century.”
But, did the West celebrate prematurely the implosion of the Soviet
empire? Apart from “Havana Syndrome” (microwave attacks on U.S.
diplomats), Putin’s Russia, and its war to reclaim Ukraine, remains a
major geopolitical rival, with its hackers holding U.S. companies
hostage for ransom. Of the remaining communist one-party
states–People’s Republic of China, N. Korea, Vietnam, Laos, and
Cuba–“China” poses the greatest challenge. China’s hackers excel at
stealing U.S. civilian and military tech secrets, while its trade and
investment policies aim to create dependent “vassal” states. Thus, U.S.
companies are constrained by lack of parts that are manufactured abroad,
including strategic high tech and medicines. The question arises: Can
the U.S. heal its unprecedented internal social divisions of identity
politics, and find the courage to withstand China’s “smoke-and-mirrors”
gambit for world domination? According to David P. Goldman’s You Will Be
Assimilated: China’s Plan to Sino-Form the World, “China” has thrown
down the gauntlet globally, whose success would signify the ultimate
triumph of its “Made in China” strategy. Can democracies compete with
dictatorships in the 21st century without becoming like their
adversaries? If so, how can the American experiment in popular
self-government meet the challenges of an uncharted future?

Continue reading “CFP: JIS Symposium 2022: “The American Century & Its Challenges: U.S., Russia, China””

CFP: Industrious Nations: Reconsidering Nationality and Economy in the Soviet Union

Deadline: May 31, 2022

Co-sponsored by Princeton University’s Department of History and Columbia University’s Harriman Institute

Russia’s attack on Ukraine illustrates the continued importance of understanding the historical formation of national narratives in post-Soviet spaces. Marking the centennial of the Soviet Union’s founding in 1922, this two-day workshop will explore the relationship between national identity and the economy in the Soviet Union. Although the pursuit of economic equality among all national groups was an explicit goal of Soviet economic policy, the interplay of nationality and economic issues has received little scholarly attention. Historians writing on nationality in the Soviet Union have long focused on the politics of language and culture. At the same time, scholars researching the Soviet economy have often tacitly assumed a uniform, technocratic, de-nationalized society, revealing an imagined binary of Soviet vs. national. In a similar vein, studies of the Soviet working class have long centered on ethnic Russians, paying little attention to other national groups.

Continue reading “CFP: Industrious Nations: Reconsidering Nationality and Economy in the Soviet Union”

Call for Essays on Soviet and Post-Soviet Animation 

Deadline: June 7, 2022

We are editing a collection of essays on “Transcultural Influences in Soviet and Post-Soviet Animation.” The goal of the volume is to illuminate transcultural links in Soviet and Post-Soviet Animation, for instance, the influence of Disney on Soviet animation, screenings of Soviet cartoons abroad, animation festivals, etc. We are including both influences from the West to the Soviet Union (and back) and cross-cultural exchanges within the (former) Soviet republics.

Continue reading “Call for Essays on Soviet and Post-Soviet Animation “

CFP: JIS Symposium 2022: “The American Century & Its Challenges: U.S., Russia, China” (Online)

Deadline: June 1, 2022


Suggested Themes:
It is by now legendary that the 20th century was “the American Century.”
But, did the West celebrate prematurely the implosion of the Soviet
empire? Apart from “Havana Syndrome” (microwave attacks on U.S.
diplomats), Putin’s Russia, and its war to reclaim Ukraine, remains a
major geopolitical rival, with its hackers holding U.S. companies
hostage for ransom. Of the remaining communist one-party
states–People’s Republic of China, N. Korea, Vietnam, Laos, and
Cuba–“China” poses the greatest challenge. China’s hackers excel at
stealing U.S. civilian and military tech secrets, while its trade and
investment policies aim to create dependent “vassal” states. Thus, U.S.
companies are constrained by lack of parts that are manufactured abroad,
including strategic high tech and medicines. The question arises: Can
the U.S. heal its unprecedented internal social divisions of identity
politics, and find the courage to withstand China’s “smoke-and-mirrors”
gambit for world domination? According to David P. Goldman’s You Will Be
Assimilated: China’s Plan to Sino-Form the World, “China” has thrown
down the gauntlet globally, whose success would signify the ultimate
triumph of its “Made in China” strategy. Can democracies compete with
dictatorships in the 21st century without becoming like their
adversaries? If so, how can the American experiment in popular
self-government meet the challenges of an uncharted future?

Continue reading “CFP: JIS Symposium 2022: “The American Century & Its Challenges: U.S., Russia, China” (Online)”

CFP: Bobby R. Inman Award

Deadline: June 30, 2022

Overview: The Inman Award competition is designed to recognize outstanding research and writing by students at the undergraduate or graduate levels on topics related to intelligence and national security. There is no prescribed topic, format, or length for papers submitted. It is presumed that most papers will have been prepared to satisfy a course or degree requirement of the author’s academic program. Co-authored and “team project” papers will be accepted.

About: The Bobby R. Inman award recognizes more than six decades of distinguished public service by Bobby R. Inman, Admiral, U.S. Navy (Ret.). Admiral Inman served in multiple leadership positions in the U.S. military, intelligence community, private industry, and at The University of Texas. His previous intelligence posts include Director of Naval Intelligence, Vice-Director of the Defense Intelligence Agency, Director of the National Security Agency, and Deputy Director of Central Intelligence. He continues to serve as an advisor and mentor to UT students and faculty members, and current government officials.

Eligibility: All undergraduate and graduate students enrolled at an accredited U.S. higher education institution during the 2021-22 academic year are eligible to participate. A student may submit only one paper that has not been published previously.

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CFP: JIS Symposium – The American Century and its Challenges

Deadline: May 15, 2022

Special Panel: Russia-Ukraine Reconciliation: Two People, One Faith–The Promise of Eastern Orthodoxy

Keynote: Charles McDaniel (Baylor University): “Reinhold Niebuhr’s Vision: Christian Realism in an Emergent World Order” 

Suggested Themes:

It is by now legendary that the 20th century was “the American Century.”  But, did the West celebrate prematurely the implosion of the Soviet empire?  Apart from “Havana Syndrome” (microwave attacks on U.S. diplomats), Putin’s Russia, and its war to reclaim Ukraine, remains a major geopolitical rival, with its hackers holding U.S. companies hostage for ransom.  Of the remaining communist one-party states–People’s Republic of China, N. Korea, Vietnam, Laos, and Cuba–“China” poses the greatest challenge.  China’s hackers excel at stealing U.S. civilian and military tech secrets, while its trade and investment policies aim to create dependent “vassal” states.  Thus, U.S. companies are constrained by lack of parts that are manufactured abroad, including strategic high tech and medicines.  The question arises: Can the U.S. heal its unprecedented internal social divisions of identity politics, and find the courage to withstand China’s “smoke-and-mirrors” gambit for world domination?  According to David P. Goldman’s You Will Be Assimilated: China’s Plan to Sino-Form the World, “China” has thrown down the gauntlet globally, whose success would signify the ultimate triumph of its “Made in China” strategy.  Can democracies compete with dictatorships in the 21st century without becoming like their adversaries?  If so, how can the American experiment in popular self-government meet the challenges of an uncharted future?

Continue reading “CFP: JIS Symposium – The American Century and its Challenges”

CFP: Industrious Nations: Reconsidering Nationality and Economy in the Soviet Union

Deadline: May 22, 2022

Princeton, New Jersey
October 28-29, 2022

Call for Papers
Deadline: May 22, 2022

Co-sponsored by Princeton University’s Department of History and Columbia University’s Harriman Institute

Russia’s attack on Ukraine illustrates the continued importance of understanding the historical formation of national narratives in post-Soviet spaces. Marking the centennial of the Soviet Union’s founding in 1922, this two-day workshop will explore the relationship between national identity and the economy in the Soviet Union. Although the pursuit of economic equality among all national groups was an explicit goal of Soviet economic policy, the interplay of nationality and economic issues has received little scholarly attention. Historians writing on nationality in the Soviet Union have long focused on the politics of language and culture. At the same time, scholars researching the Soviet economy have often tacitly assumed a uniform, technocratic, de-nationalized society, revealing an imagined binary of Soviet vs. national. In a similar vein, studies of the Soviet working class have long centered on ethnic Russians, paying little attention to other national groups.

Continue reading “CFP: Industrious Nations: Reconsidering Nationality and Economy in the Soviet Union”

CFP: Northeast Modern Language Association Conference (NeMLA)

Deadline: April 29, 2022

As area director in comparative literature and Slavic studies, I invite you to submit session proposals for next year’s Northeast Modern Language Association conference (NeMLA) at Niagara Falls (USA) to be held on March 23-26, 2023.  At our last convention in Baltimore we already had several excellent sessions on Russian poetry and prose, and it would be wonderful to continue these conversations and to have a broader representation of the Slavic field at NeMLA. The deadline for Call for Session Proposals is April 29.

Please propose a session for inclusion in the Northeast Modern Language Association’s 54th Annual Convention in Niagara Falls, NY, March 23-26, 2023. Chair guidelines and information about session formats are available on our website.

Click here to propose a session!* The deadline is April 29, 2022.

*Abstract proposals will be accepted between June 15 and September 30.

The Thursday opening address will be given by Tim Dean. The Friday keynote event will be given by Anne Enright.


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CFP: Firms, Wars, and Ethics in the Business History of Central, East Europe, and Russia

Deadline: April 28, 2022

Place: Università Ca’ Foscari, Venice
Date: October 21-22, 2022

For this 4th Workshop on Business History in Central and Eastern Europe, the organizers invite scholars, including Ph.D. students of any relevant discipline to submit paper proposals on a broad range of topics related to business actors & corporate behavior in (and after) armed conflicts during the 20th century.

The workshop will particularly draw on historical research on the two World Wars and their aftermaths to provide tentative answers to several questions evoked by the Russia-Ukraine war of 2022. The aim is to explore the relationship between business and geopolitics from a long-term historical perspective focusing on the economic and social consequences of the war, including (de)globalization processes.

Continue reading “CFP: Firms, Wars, and Ethics in the Business History of Central, East Europe, and Russia”