Author Archives: Roy Flores

Conference: Reading Race in Cold War Cultural Internationalism (UCLA)

Dates of the Conference: March 29-April 1, 2018

Reading Race in Cold War Cultural Internationalism
An ACLA Seminar (UCLA, March 29-April 1, 2018)
Organized by Cate I. Reilly, Duke University

This seminar looks at the intertwined Soviet and Eastern Bloc legacies on race, cultural solidarity, and geopolitics. It moves beyond the extensive body of prior scholarship on regional ethnic minorities within Central and Eastern Europe and related questions of religious conflict. The seminar instead focuses on how writers, artists, and filmmakers in Central and Eastern Europe and across decolonizing regions during the Cold War, conceived of and negotiated race in the context of newfound, transnational aesthetic commitments.

The seminar asks: How did the epistemic effort to think internationally (by intellectuals from the USSR, GDR, Africa, and the Americas) interface with questions of racial identity? How did such concerns play out when the rough ideological alliances between the Eastern Bloc and emerging nations were challenged by writers and thinkers who were critical of the Soviet Union? In what ways did the early political framework of international solidarity in the USSR, conceived under the heading of the “Friendship of the Peoples,” contain a racialized dimension later played out in the global power struggles of the Cold War? How should frequent claims to racial equality in the Eastern Bloc be treated when occurring in the context of anti-imperialist (and anti-U.S.) propaganda?

The seminar invites literary-critical and interdisciplinary reflections on the conflicted history of race in Central and Eastern Europe during the Cold War, as situated against a backdrop of changing ideological and national alliances.  It pays specific attention to a gap within postcolonial theory related to Soviet ideologies and cultural influences. Building on recent conferences that have addressed the legacy of Bandung humanisms, “translating” race in Eurasia, and performances of difference in Central and Eastern Europe, it moves temporally forward from the abundance of research on the role of minorities in the Russian avant-garde of the 1920s and 1930s. Possible paper topics include, but are not limited to: Eurasia’s place in postcolonial theory; literature and national autonomy movements of the Cold War; the conflicted relationship between the Communist and non-Communist intellectuals (Jomo Kenyatta, Kwame Nkrumah, Patrice Lumumba, Léopold Senghor, Cheikh Anta Diop, among others); negritude and internationalism; translation and the circulation of texts/media between Eastern Europe and Africa; the influence of Socialist realist literature on African writers.

Interested applicants should submit a 250-300 word proposal.

Academic Job: Jean Monnet Postdoctoral Fellowships (RSCAS)

Deadline for Applications: October 25, 2017

The Robert Schuman Centre for Advanced Studies (RSCAS) offers one-year Jean Monnet Fellowships to scholars who have obtained their doctorate more than 5 years prior to the start of the fellowship, i.e. 1 September 2018 for the academic year 2018-19. The Fellowship programme is open to post-docs, tenure track academics and those wishing to spend their sabbatical at the Robert Schuman Centre. We invite you to become part of a lively and creative academic community. The Centre offers up to 20 Fellowships a year.

Jean Monnet Fellows are selected on the basis of a research proposal and of their CV. The research proposal should fit well with one of the Centre’s main research themes, programmes and projects. The three main research themes of the RSCAS are:

  • Integration, Governance and Democracy;
  • Regulating Markets and Governing Money; and
  • 21st Century World Politics and Europe.

More information about the Centre’s research programmes and projects can be found on the RSCAS web site. Continue reading

Funding Opportunity: Samuel H. Kress Fellowship (Fitch Foundation)

Deadline for Applications: October 25, 2017

Research grants of up to $15,000 will be awarded to one mid-career professional whose research project relates to the appreciation, interpretation, preservation, study and teaching of European art, architecture and related disciplines from antiquity to the early 19th century, in the context of historic preservation in the United States. Potential Kress Fellow projects could include the exploration of shared European and American influences in style, design, materials, construction techniques, building types, conservation and interpretation methodologies, philosophical and theoretical attitudes, and other factors applicable to preservation in both Europe and America.

Funding for the Kress Fellowship is made possible through the generous support of the Samuel H. Kress Foundation.

Criteria for Evaluation

Applications are reviewed by the Fitch Trustees. Projects will be evaluated on the following criteria:

  • The project will make a meaningful contribution to the academic and/or professional field of historic preservation in the United States
  • The applicant has a realistic plan for the dissemination of research and/or final work product
  • The project has a clear and realistic goals, timeframe, work plan, and budget
  • The project demonstrates innovative thinking, original research and creative problem solving and/or design

Continue reading

Graduate Program: Graduate Student Fellowships (Notre Dame Institute for Advanced Study)

Deadline for Applications: October 16, 2017

The Notre Dame Institute for Advanced Study (NDIAS) is dedicated to fostering and supporting integrative scholarship addressing ultimate questions at the intersection of the arts, engineering, humanities, law, and formal, natural, and social sciences, especially those that transcend disciplinary boundaries.

The NDIAS encourages graduate student applicants to include questions of values in their analyses, to integrate diverse disciplines, and to ask how their findings advance civilization. The Institute offers its fellows the opportunity to engage not only in analysis but also in evaluating what should be done, to analyze the world in substantive and collaborative ways, and to think through the implications of present behavior for the future of the world.

As a collaborative academic community, the Institute cultivates the contemplative ideal that is an essential factor in the Catholic intellectual tradition and vital for the progression of scholarship. The greatest advances do not occur in solitude, but in the company of others who share a passion for advancement and are open to dialogue and collaboration.

Research Support

The NDIAS offers fellowships to advanced graduate students for a full academic year (fall and spring semesters, August through May). The Institute also encourages graduate students to address ultimate questions and questions of value while a member of the Institute’s academic community.

Graduate fellowships range up to a maximum of $25,000 (gross amount) and include a $1,000 research account, office facilities in the Institute, a computer and printer, access to University libraries and other facilities, and twice-weekly Institute seminars and other events. Continue reading

Academic Job: Residential Fellowships (Notre Dame Institute for Advanced Study)

Deadline for Applications: October 16, 2017

The Notre Dame Institute for Advanced Study (NDIAS) is dedicated to fostering and supporting integrative scholarship addressing ultimate questions at the intersection of the arts, engineering, the humanities, law, and the formal, natural, and social sciences, especially those that transcend disciplinary boundaries.

The NDIAS encourages scholars to include questions of values in their analyses, to integrate diverse disciplines, and to ask how their findings advance civilization. The Institute offers its fellows the opportunity to engage not only in analysis but also in evaluating what should be done, to analyze the world in substantive and collaborative ways, and to think through the implications of present behavior for the future of the world.

Research Support

The NDIAS offers residential fellowships for periods ranging from three weeks to a full academic year (fall and spring semesters, August through May). Fellowships range up to a maximum of $60,000 (gross amount) per academic year (up to a maximum of $30,000 [gross amount] per semester) or pro-rated amounts for shorter periods. In addition, fellows who do not reside in the greater Michiana area are provided with subsidized visiting faculty housing located adjacent to the University during their fellowship. Applicants who require additional support beyond the fellowship stipend should seek supplementary funding in the form of external grants or sabbatical and other contributions from their home institutions. When preferable due to reasons such as faculty retirement contributions, ongoing employment, or the tracking of external funding, the NDIAS will pay a fellowship stipend directly to a Fellow’s home institution.

Fellowships include research expenditures of up to $1,000, a private office in the Institute, a computer and printer, access to University libraries and other facilities, and twice-weekly Institute seminars and other events. Continue reading

Funding Opportunity: Cotsen Excavation Grants (AIA)

Deadline for Applications: November 01, 2017

Amount: up to $25,000
Application: http://www.archaeological.org/grants/form/10135

The Cotsen Excavation Grant Program provides two grants per year of up to $25,000 each.

  • One will be for a first time director launching a new project
  • One will be open to all professionals working in the field

To be eligible, applicants must have been AIA members in good standing for at least two consecutive years by the application deadline and must have a Ph.D. in archaeology or related field.

Applicants must be the primary permit holder for the excavation. Permits must be obtained before funds are dispersed.

The AIA will not fund overhead costs. Please note that funds may not be used for survey expenses and equipment, publication, or for salaries for principal investigators, or to purchase land. Potential applicants are invited to review these documents before submitting their narratives and budgets. Continue reading

Funding Opportunity: Mellon Fellowships for Assistant Professors (IAS)

Deadline for Applications: November 01, 2017

THE SCHOOL OF HISTORICAL STUDIES at the Institute for Advanced Study, with the support of the Andrew Mellon Foundation, established a program of one year memberships for assistant professors at universities and colleges in the United States and Canada to support promising young scholars who have embarked on professional careers. While at the Institute they will be expected to engage exclusively in scholarly research and writing.

The School supports approximately three scholars each year under the auspices of the Mellon Fellowships for Assistant Professors. Appointments are for one academic year from September 1st until July 31st, and will carry all the privileges of Membership at the Institute for Advanced Study. The stipend will normally match the combined salary and benefits at the Member’s home institution at the time of application, but the amount offered will be adjusted in the event the scholar receives simultaneous support from other sources.

Eligibility:

To be considered, assistant professors must be working on projects in areas represented in the School of Historical Studies, and should preferably have gone beyond revising the dissertation. The School is interested in all fields of historical research, but is concerned principally with the history of Western, Near Eastern and Far Eastern civilizations, with particular emphasis upon Greek and Roman civilization, the history of Europe (medieval, early modern, and modern), the Islamic world, East Asian studies, the history of art, the history of science, and modern international relations.

To be eligible, scholars must currently hold the title “Assistant Professor” (not including the title “Visiting Assistant Professor”) at a college or university in the U.S. or Canada and as of the application deadline the scholar must be no more than 6 years beyond the date of the Ph.D.  Scholars must also be able to return to their current institution after the fellowship.

For more information, and to apply, click here.

Funding Opportunity: Program in Religion Journalism & International Affairs Fellowships for Scholars (Luce/ACLS)

Deadline for Applications: October 25, 2017

Fellowship Details

  • Stipend: $55,000, plus up to $3,000 for research costs and related scholarly activities
  • Fellowships may be held at the awardee’s home institution, one of three partnering universities, or any location suitable for the proposed research.
  • Awardees electing to relocate to take up residence at one of three university partners will receive an additional stipend of up to $10,000
  • Tenure: one academic year
  • Completed applications must be submitted through the ACLS online fellowship and grant administration system (ofa.acls.org) no later than 9 pm Eastern Daylight Time, October 25, 2017

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Funding Opportunity: Distinguished Visiting Fellowship 2018-2019 (CUNY)

Deadline for Applications: October 31, 2017

Please note that THESE FELLOWSHIPS CARRY NO TEACHING DUTIES. The deadline for applications is Tuesday, October 31st, 2017. Notification of acceptance will be sent by January 31st, 2018.

The Advanced Research Collaborative (ARC) of the Graduate Center invites applicants for Distinguished Fellowships for the 2018 – 2019 academic year. Applicants should have outstanding records of published research and scholarship. In addition to academic distinction, preference will be given to scholars whose interests strengthen the research priorities of ARC in the following areas: Inequality, Immigration, Multilingualism, or Global Cities. Distinguished Fellows are provided with an office, a computer, and access to the Graduate Center’s academic infrastructure. Continue reading

Academic Job: Katz Center Fellowships (U. of Pennsylvania)

Deadline for Applications: October 31, 2017

In 2018–2019, the Katz Center for Advanced Judaic Studies at the University of Pennsylvania devotes its fellowship to the study of Jews in modern Islamic contexts.

The fellowship will support scholarship on Jewish life, culture and thought as these have developed in modern times across North Africa, the Levant, the Arabian Peninsula, and Central and South Asia. We will question the meaning of modernity beyond the more familiar European, American, and Israeli contexts and welcome research projects that address topics from the sixteenth century and later.

The goals for the year are to bridge linguistic, geographic, social, and methodological boundaries, to connect the study of the intellectual with the study of the everyday, and to encourage attention to new sources and approaches. We seek applications from a range of disciplinary orientations: history, textual study, anthropology, art history, media studies, and other fields that expand or redefine the parameters of the topic.

Eligible projects may focus on the complex relationships between Jews and their Muslims neighbors, or with members of various other non-Muslim or minority communities in the Islamic world. Also relevant is research that explores Jews’ participation in various forms of local, regional, national, colonial, and imperial forms of governance in modern North Africa, the Middle East and Central Asia, as well as projects focused on gender relations, economic behavior, cultural expression, and religious life as these developed across diverse Islamic contexts.

For more information, and to apply, click here.