Author Archives: Roy Flores

Study Abroad: “Understanding Europe in an Age of Uncertainty” (Charles U.)

Deadline for Applications: February 22, 2018

Understanding Europe in an Age of Uncertainty
April 8th – April 19th, 2018

The objective of the academic course “Spring University Prague 2018: Understanding Europe in an Age of Uncertainty” is to provide students with a broad understanding of the most significant political and social issues in contemporary Europe.

Instead of relaxing at the “End of History” after the collapse of Eastern Bloc in 1989, Europe is facing new challenges at the beginning of the 21st century. These new challenges – including the economic and financial crisis, ageing population, complicated relations with Russia and Turkey, terrorist attacks connected with the activities of the Islamic State and most currently, the strong immigration flow – are raising concerns and leading to significant political radicalisation and social unrest. On the one hand, this challenging period raises feelings of uncertainty: Are we moving from solid to “liquid times”? What will “Europe” mean in the future? How does all this influence our everyday lives? On the other hand, this “Age of Uncertainty” is an ideal time to revise common approaches and look for new perspectives. We will, together, analyse and discuss the current development of Europe in an inspiring environment made up of students coming from countries all over the world.

The course provides an interdisciplinary approach and combines multiple learning methods, such as lectures, workshops, round-table discussions, field work, group-work and student presentations. Students will not only have the opportunity to explore a range of interesting topics and gain valuable insights into the current challenges and risks to the development of Europe, but will also have occasion to improve their research and presentation skills.

For more information, and to apply, click here.

Graduate Program: Masters in Economics, Statistics, and Finance (HSE)

Deadline for Applications: February 28, 2018

Moscow-based Faculty of Economic Sciences at the Higher School of Economics invites highly motivated international students who excel in mathematics to apply to do master studies in economics, statistics and finance. If you have any student who is interested to study in Russia please advise them to look at the faculty of economic sciences at the Higher School of Economics (HSE) located in Moscow, Russia.

Deadline for full scholarship application is February 28, 2018

Graduate study at HSE in Moscow provides students with dual degrees opportunities, career development, and employment opportunities.

Affordable and safe dormitories are provided for all enrolled students.

HSE offer two master’s programs are taught in English:

– ICEF’s Financial Economics, taught in cooperation with University of London (London School of Economics and Political Science), and
– Strategic Corporate Finance program

To study in these programs students do not need Russian language. They need to have strong quantitative skills, solid mathematics background, be interested in finance and economics, and be willing to study in Moscow. Continue reading

Prof. Devel.: Summer Workshop in Language Pedagogy, Technologies, Research and Proficiency Testing (Duke U.)

Deadline for Registration: February 28, 2018

Slavic and Eurasian Language Resource Center
Summer Workshop in Language Pedagogy, Technologies,
Research and Proficiency Testing
at
Duke University
July 23-25, 2018

The Duke Slavic and Eurasian Language Resource Center will host a summer workshop from July 23 to July 25, 2018 on Language Pedagogy, Research & Proficiency Testing, and is pleased to invite applications from interested K-12 and university faculty, scholars, graduate students, and professionals to enroll in the workshop.

There is an additional session devoted exclusively to Russian language proficiency testing training and certification in CEFR proficiency testing from July 26-29, 2018.

Topics of presentations at previous workshops have included:
•       Neuroimaging and multilingualism
•       Teaching language and culture through film
•       Language proficiency testing
•       Specialized language instruction at the advanced and superior levels
•       The use of technology in the language classroom
•       Integrating heritage students in the language classroom
•       Addressing the needs of differently-abled students
•       Using computer technologies to create pedagogical materials
•       The role of grammar in proficiency-based instruction
•       Popular culture and language instruction
•       Web resources for language teachers

Individuals interested in enrolling in the workshop should write to Jessica Dougherty at jessica.dougherty@duke.edu no later than February 28, 2018. There are no registration or participation fees for the workshop. Modest funding support to defray expenses for travel and accommodations is available for participants.

Funding: NEH Senior Research Fellowship Program (CAORC)

Deadline for Applications: January 31, 2018

The Council of American Overseas Research Centers (CAORC) is pleased to announce the National Endowment for the Humanities Senior Research Fellowship Program! This fellowship supports advanced research in the humanities for U.S. postdoctoral scholars, and foreign national postdoctoral scholars who have been residents in the US for three or more years.

Scholars must carry out research in a country which hosts a participating American overseas research center. Eligible countries for 2017-2018 are: Algeria, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Cambodia, Cyprus, Georgia, Indonesia, Mexico, Mongolia, Morocco, Nepal, Senegal, Sri Lanka or Tunisia. Fellowship stipends are $4,200 per month for a maximum of four months. This program is funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) under the Fellowship Programs at Independent Research Institutions (FPIRI).

Applications will be available on September 1, 2017 with a deadline of midnight on January 31, 2018. Please click on the ‘frequently asked questions’ link above for further details.

For more information, and to apply, click here.

Funding: Title VIII-Supported Summer Research Scholarships (Kennan Institute)

Deadline for Applications: January 31, 2018

Kennan Institute Title VIII Summer Research Fellowships

Scholars who conduct research in the social sciences or humanities focusing on Russia and the other countries of Eurasia, and who demonstrate a particular need to utilize the library, archival, and other specialized resources of the Washington, D.C. area should consider applying for the summer research fellowship. Policy-relevant research is preferred. The summer research fellowship must be used for two consecutive months between May-September 2017, and applicants are required to hold an MA degree or higher.  The Summer Research Scholarships will provide a stipend of $7,000 for 2 months, research facilities, computer support, and some research assistance.  Travel and accommodation expenses are not directly covered by this fellowship.

Applicants are required to submit a concise description (700-800 words) of his or her research project, curriculum vitae, a statement on preferred dates of residence in Washington, D.C., and two letters of recommendation specifically in support of the research to be conducted at the Institute.  All of these materials may be submitted via email to kennan@wilsoncenter.org. (Letters of recommendation may also be sent by email as scanned, signed letters.)  Applicants must be U.S. Citizens. Closing date is January 31, 2018.

Academic Job: Visiting Faculty Fellowship (Vanderbilt U.)

Deadline for Applications: January 19, 2018

“The World of Print(s): Multiples and Meanings in Early Modern Europe and North America”

Program co-directors: Mark Hosford (Associate Professor of Art) and Kevin Murphy (Andrew W. Mellon Chair in the Humanities and Professor of History of Art)

Application Deadline: Friday, January 19, 2018

The Robert Penn Warren Center for the Humanities will host a year-long interdisciplinary faculty seminar to explore the significance of printed words and images in Early Modern Europe and North America. Though the current age is often considered unique in terms of the amount of information constantly flooding the airwaves and the Internet, it is important to historicize the current phenomenon in comparison to the Early Modern period when there was an explosion of printed materials that similarly saturated the West. The advent of cheap print in the late seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries meant that larger audiences than ever before had access to the marketplace of written words, some serious and thoughtful, some salacious and sensational.  Images on woodblocks combined with moveable type made possible the publication of a variety of illustrated texts as well. The visual culture brought about by the advent of this technology in the Early Modern period was the backdrop to the work of some of the greatest printmakers of all time.

The seminar participants will put printed works—comprising both textual and visual elements—at the center of an analysis that sees them as representations of discourses external to the objects and, at the same time, as material things. Seminar participants will draw upon contemporary scholarship through various disciplinary lenses, including literary theory and art history.  By bridging a variety of disciplines, scholars in the seminar will produce a synthetic view of Early Modern visual culture and its role in shaping political and social opinion. This collaborative work will lead to new perspectives on current debates regarding the presentation and circulation of information and images in the twenty-first century.

We invite applications for the William S. Vaughn Visiting Fellowship from scholars in all disciplines whose lively presence will help to focus our work and stimulate discussions.  The successful applicant will have completed the terminal degree in her/his field at the time of application and will have a record of scholarly publications, research, or creative expression. The seminar will meet regularly and will also allow the Visiting Fellow ample time to pursue a major research project. The combined interests of the Visiting Fellow and the Vanderbilt Faculty Fellows will determine the form and content of seminar discussions.

The Visiting Fellow is provided with a spacious office within the Center’s own building. The fellowship pays a stipend of up to $50,000 and provides $2,000 in moving expenses.  Application materials may be downloaded from our website:  vanderbilt.edu/rpw_center.  Complete applications must be submitted by January 19, 2018.

For more information, and to apply, click here.

Funding: Pre-Dissertation Fellowships for Research in Europe (CES)

Deadline for Applications: January 15, 2018

Alliance and the Council for European Studies (CES) invite eligible graduate students to apply for its 2018-19 CES Pre-Dissertation Research Fellowships. Created in the fall of 2002, Alliance is a non-profit transatlantic joint-venture between Columbia University and three prestigious French institutions: the École Polytechnique, Sciences Po, and Panthéon-Sorbonne University. Each fellowship includes a $4,500 stipend to fund two months’ research in Europe and travel support for attending and presenting at the International Conference of Europeanists.
Eligibility:

The Alliance – CES Pre-Dissertation Research Fellowship is intended to fund fellows’ first research project in Europe. Applicants must:

  • be enrolled in a doctoral program at a university that is a member of Alliance (Columbia University, Sciences Po, École Polytechnique, Panthéon-Sorbonne University)
  • not have completed the majority of doctoral coursework
  • not have begun substantial dissertation research in Europe.

Barring exceptional circumstances, students who have already received comparable support for pre-dissertation research will not be considered eligible.

Deadlines:

The annual application period opens October 1. Applications are due (along with all supporting materials) on or before January 15. Applicants will be notified of the Committee’s decision by the end of April.

For more information, and to apply, click here.

Funding: Houghton Library Visiting Fellows (Harvard U.)

Deadline for Applications: January 18, 2018

The collections of Houghton Library touch upon almost every aspect of the human record, particularly the history and culture of Europe and North America, and include special concentrations in the history of printing and of theater. Materials held here range from medieval manuscripts and early printed books to the working papers of living writers. Fellows will also have access to collections in Widener Library as well as to other libraries at the University. Preference is given to scholars whose research is closely based on materials in Houghton collections, especially when those materials are unique; and we particularly welcome proposals for research projects drawing on our holdings related to Africa, the Americas, Asia, and Oceania, and to histories of marginalized people; fellowships are normally not granted to scholars who live within commuting distance of the library. Each fellow is expected to be in residence at Houghton for at least four weeks during the period from July 2018 through June 2019 (these do not have to be consecutive weeks), and each fellow will be expected to produce a written summary of his/her experience working with the collections. The stipend for each fellowship is $3,600.  Continue reading

Funding: Digital Humanities Advancement Grants (NEH)

Deadline for Applications: November 30, 2017

Digital Humanities Advancement Grants (DHAG) support digital projects throughout their lifecycles, from early start-up phases through implementation and long-term sustainability. Experimentation, reuse, and extensibility are hallmarks of this grant category, leading to innovative work that can scale to enhance research, teaching, and public programming in the humanities.

This program is offered twice per year. Proposals are welcome for digital initiatives in any area of the humanities.

Through a special partnership, the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) anticipates providing additional funding to this program to encourage innovative collaborations between museum or library professionals and humanities professionals to advance preservation of, access to, use of, and engagement with digital collections and services. Through this partnership, IMLS and NEH may jointly fund some DHAG projects that involve collaborations with museums and/or libraries.

Digital Humanities Advancement Grants may involve

  • creating or enhancing experimental, computationally-based methods, techniques, or infrastructure that contribute to the humanities;
  • pursuing scholarship that examines the history, criticism, and philosophy of digital culture and its impact on society, or explores the philosophical or practical implications and impact of digital humanities in specific fields or disciplines; or
  • revitalizing and/or recovering existing digital projects that promise to contribute substantively to scholarship, teaching, or public knowledge of the humanities.

Program Statistics

In its initial competition the Digital Humanities Advancement Grants program received 164 applications and made 27 awards, for a funding ratio of 16 percent.

Questions?

Contact the Office of Digital Humanities (ODH) via e-mail at odh@neh.gov. Applicants wishing to speak to a staff member by telephone should provide in an e-mail message a telephone number and a preferred time to call. Applicants who are deaf or hard of hearing can contact NEH via Federal Relay (TTY users) at 800-877-8399.

Funding: Digital Extension Grants (ACLS)

Dealdine for Applications: November 30, 2017

ACLS invites applications for the ACLS Digital Extension Grant Program, made possible by the generous assistance of The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. This program supports digitally based research projects in all disciplines of the humanities and related social sciences. It is hoped that these grants will help advance humanistic scholarship by enhancing established digital projects, extending their reach to new communities of users, and supporting teams of scholars at all career stages as they participate in digital research projects.

This program aims to extend the opportunity to participate in the digital transformation of humanistic inquiry to a greater number of humanities scholars. To this end, projects supported by ACLS Digital Extension Grants may:

  • Develop new systems of making existing digital resources available to broader audiences and/or scholars from diverse institutions
  • Extend existing digital projects and resources with content that adds diversity or interdisciplinary reach
  • Foster new team-based collaborations between scholars at all career stages. Projects that convene, train, and empower communities of humanities faculty and/or graduate students around established digital research projects, as well as projects that allow scholars from institutions with limited digital infrastructure to exploit digital resources or to participate in existing labs or working groups, are especially welcome
  • Create new forms and sites for scholarly engagement with the digital humanities. Projects that document and recognize participant engagement are strongly encouraged.

ACLS will award up to five Digital Extension Grants in this competition year. Each grant provides funding of up to $125,000 to support a range of project costs, including, where necessary, salary replacement for faculty or staff, software, equipment, travel, project related convenings, and consultant fees. ACLS especially welcomes projects that demonstrate concrete plans to extend their reach through developing new collaborations with partners at different institutions and/or engaging in community building activities with scholars at all career stages from US higher education institutions of diverse profiles; such projects are eligible for maximum funding of up to $150,000. Allocation of funds between collaboration and basic project costs may be determined by the applicant (see “Budgeting for New Collaborations” below).

Applicants must list current and past funding sources for their projects; in the case of joint funding sources for the project, applicants should indicate clearly in their budget plans how each source of project funding will be used during the ACLS grant period.

ACLS grants do not support projects whose focus is the production of creative works (e.g., novels or films), textbooks, straightforward translations, or purely pedagogical projects. Institutional indirect costs will not be covered.

For more information, and to apply, click here.