Graduate and Undergraduate Essay Contest on Dostoevsky-Related Topics

Deadline: June 1, 2021

We are excited to announce that the Readers’ Advisory Board of the North American Dostoevsky Society is running another student essay contest! This year, we are looking for outstanding undergraduate- and graduate-student essays on Dostoevsky-related topics. Nominate your best students… or nominate yourself! See the two separate CFPs below for more details. Good luck!

Note: because of the COVID-19 pandemic, we have extended the competition to encompass 2019-21. Please note the updated submission date of June 1, 2021 (submissions are welcome on a rolling basis).

Undergraduate CFP

The North American Dostoevsky Society (NADS) invites IDS/NADS members in good standing to nominate outstanding student essays on Dostoevsky-related topics. (If you are not a member of IDS or NADS, you can join at https://dostoevsky.org/). Students are welcome to nominate their own work, in which case IDS/NADS membership is not required. The topic is open; however, Dostoevsky and his works should be the main focus of the essay. The winner of the undergraduate contest will receive free membership in NADS for one year and a Dostoevsky-themed swag.

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Outstanding Essay Prize – Central / East / South European Cinema and Media Studies

Deadline: March 1, 2021

The chairs of the Central / East / South European Cinemas Scholarly Interest Group at the Society of Cinema and Media Studies (SCMS)mare pleased to announce the seventh annual prize for an outstanding published essay in the field of Central/East/South European Cinema and Media Studies. Submissions will be judged by a panel of experts, and the winner will be announced in time for the upcoming 2021 SCMS meeting (which this year will take place online). The winner will be awarded a cash prize of $500.

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Call for submissions: AAUS 2019-2020 Article Prize, Book Prize, and Translation Prize competition

Extended Deadline: February 28, 2021

American Association for Ukrainian Studies (AAUS) invites nominations (including self-nominations) for the next round of the AAUS Book, Article, and Translation Prizes. For this round, works published in 2019 and 2020 are eligible (as long as they were not nominated last year, as each work can be considered for a prize only once). Deadline for nominated works to be received by members of the prize committees has been EXTENDED UNTIL FEBRUARY 28, 2021. For more information and submission guidelines, please visit
https://ukrainianstudies.org/call-for-submissions-aaus-2019-2020-article-prize-book-prize-and-translation-prize-competition-deadline-february-15-2021/

CFP: Translating Russian Literature in Global Context

Deadline: March 31, 2021

Call for Submissions: Edited Volume on Translating Russian Literature in the Global Context (2023) 

Scholars with relevant expertise are invited to submit essays for a new edited volume on the global translation and reception of Russian literary fiction in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. “Translating Russian Literature in the Global Context” (2023) is intended to constitute the first geographically coherent, culturally inclusive, and theoretically consistent model of the distribution and influence of translated Russian literature on global cultures from 1900 to the present day. The editors seek articles of up to 8,000 words on aspects of the history and influence of Russian literature in translation in different cultures for an Open Access publication funded by the European Research Council in association with the University of Exeter RusTrans project (Grant Agreement no. 802437).

Please send abstracts of no more than 500 words, excluding bibliography, to the editors (Dr Muireann Maguire and Dr Cathy McAteer) at rustrans@exeter.ac.uk, by March 31st, 2021.

For more information on this call, please visit our website: http://rustrans.exeter.ac.uk/translation-archive/translating-russian-literature-in-the-global-context/. Please do recirculate details to relevant networks.

CFP: Special Issue of Apparatus- Moving Images in the -Russian Empire

Deadline for Submissions: March 8, 2021

Call for papers on the early period of moving images in the Russian Empire for a special issue of the peer-viewed, open-access journal Apparatus. Film, Media and Digital Cultures in Central and Eastern Europe, edited by Oksana Chefranova (oksana.chefranova@yale.edu), Natascha Drubek (dr.nataschadrubek@gmail.com) and Rachel Morley (rachel.morley@ucl.ac.uk). The full text of the call is posted below, and it is also available on the Apparatus website.

Please consider sending your proposals by 8 March!

Feel free to email us with any questions and to share this call widely.

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Call for Submissions: 2021 National Post-Secondary Russian Essay Contest (ACTR)

Deadline: February 8, 2021

The American Council of Teachers of Russian is pleased to announce the 2021 National Post-Secondary Russian Essay Contest! Registration for the contest is open now. Deadline for registration for the 2021 Contest is Feb. 8th. NO LATE REGISTRATIONS WILL BE ACCEPTED! The contest should be held from February 15th to the 25th, and all essays must be submitted by Feb. 28th.

Please note that, barring any COVID-related setbacks, we hope to announce the essay contest results by mid-April. For more registration details and more information about the administration of the contest this year, please visit the ACTR website.

CFP: “The Unknown Nineteenth Century” Russian Literature Journal

Deadline: March 15, 2021

The purpose of this special issue on the “unknown nineteenth century” is to collect and highlight new research on less-studied authors, and to encourage the creation of more venues for work on a broader, more diverse, and less predictable nineteenth century. We conceive of this as a project for literary scholarship. Historians have done much to expand the social, cultural, economic, and geographic breadth of nineteenth-century Russian studies, but literary studies, with some prominent exceptions, has tended to remain locked into discussions of major canonical figures. We hope that this special issue will contribute to closing that gap. We welcome proposals for articles focused on specific writers in Russian, as well as other languages of the Russian Empire, and studies of groups of authors and of issues in the broader literary culture of the Russian Empire in the nineteenth century. Because the center of gravity for the canon of authors we now study is realism and the latter half of the nineteenth century, this issue will generally focus on the realist period (roughly, 1835-1905), but we are open to studies of literary works in all genres—novel, play, poem, feuilleton.

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CFP: Transcultural Influences in Soviet and Russian Animation

Extended Deadline: February 15, 2021

The call for papers for the edited collection “Transcultural Influences in Soviet and Russian Animation, 1917-2020” has an extended deadline of February 15, 2020. If you know anyone who is working on Soviet or Russian animation, please encourage them to submit an abstract to Sabina Amanbayeva and Irina Karlsohn. We have an interested publisher, and we want to hear from more specialists.

List of topics for the collection: 

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CFP: Cluster on Contagion and Conflagration

Deadline: February 1, 2021

Narratives of contagion and sickness offer an effective prism for the exploration and analysis of mechanisms through which our fears of contamination are turned into practices of othering, so familiar from our current daily lives. Literary encounters with deadly pathogens also offer us a chance to ponder posthumanist and environmental concerns: as the virus challenges anthropocentrism (i.e., human supremacy, exceptionalism, and control), humans are forced to renegotiate their relationships with their nonhuman others as well as to consider the role of chance and contingency in human life. The cluster of articles will make a sustained scholarly effort to examine outbreak narratives and metaphors of infection and understand the cultural politics of contagion in Russia and Eastern Europe. Comparativist perspectives are welcome.

Abstract length: 300 words

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CFP: Cultural Biopolitics in Modern Russia

Deadline: January 15, 2021

Proposals are invited for a special issue of Russian Literature dedicated to Cultural Biopolitics in Modern Russia. The term “biopolitics” was coined by Michel Foucault to describe a historical shift that took place in the 17th and 18th centuries, when an earlier concept of sovereignty, grounded in the power to decide when “to take life or let live,” was replaced by one determined by the state’s power “to foster life or disallow it to the point of death.” With the emergence of liberal democracy and modern capitalism, new forms of governmentality appeared that centered on the administration of bodies at the level of the population. From government funded programs to increase birth rates to prohibitions on smoking, euthanasia, and certain kinds of sexual behavior, natural life began to be included in the calculations of the state. Sovereign power increasingly became identified with the management of life. Politics assumed the form of biopolitics.

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