Submissions Wanted: Online Poetry Hour in honor of Abai Kunanbaev (Indiana University, Bloomington)

Deadline: September 10, 2020

The Herman B Wells Library at Indiana University (Bloomington, USA) and Nazarbayev University Library (Nur-Sultan, Kazakhstan) invite all those interested in the literature and culture of Central Asia to take part in an online poetry hour in honor of the 175th anniversary of the great Kazakh poet, Abai Kunanbaev.

The event, to be held on October 8 at 11am ET, will celebrate Abai’s writing through readings and musical renditions of his work in Kazakh and in translation. Proceedings will be moderated in English, but participants may read in ANY language. If you wish to participate, please provide the following information by no later than September 10:

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CFP: Dostoevsky and World Culture (Philological Journal)

Deadline: September 30, 2020

Dostoevsky and World Culture. Philological Journal invites submissions to its upcoming issue to be published both electronically and in hard copy.  

Dostoevsky and World Culture. Philological Journal is a quarterly peer-reviewed academic journal publishing research into the life and works of Fyodor Dostoevsky (1821-1881), into the influence of the world culture on him and his influence on the world culture in a wide range of areas. The journal welcomes submissions from scholars working in literary studies, history, cultural studies, philosophy, theology, psychology, and art history.

The journal accepts submissions in Russian and English. Articles may be submitted via the journal’s website. Submission deadline for articles to be considered for the 4th issue is September 30. Submissions received at a later date will be considered for subsequent issues.

The journal is published by the Institute of World Literature of the Russian Academy of Sciences (IMLI RAN).

Current and back issues are available at:

http://dostmirkult.ru/index.php/ru/

CFP: Slavic & East European Information Resources Journal

Deadline: October 1, 2020

This is a call for content to be featured in The Internet column of the journal Slavic & East European Information Resources, vol. 22.

Considering researchers’ and librarians’ almost absolute dependence on remote discovery and access during the coronavirus pandemic, there could hardly be a more appropriate time or venue for you to share your experience with colleagues.

How has your work changed by moving entirely online? What new online tools or resources have you discovered? What role is the internet playing in different SEE regions during the pandemic? Maybe you’re part of a new RuNet literacy project or effort to collect online repositories of Central European historical newspapers. What have been the challenges, the lessons, and the outcomes of such projects, and what work still needs to be done?

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Call for Submissions to The Russian Review: Soviet Internationalism Thirty Years after the Fall of the USSR

Deadline: September 1, 2020

The Union of What? Soviet Internationalism Thirty Years After the Fall of the USSR

When the Soviet Union collapsed, contemporaries heralded the emergence of fifteen separate republics; yet nearly three decades on, it is still common to refer to the “post-Soviet space.” Important questions remain about what it was that knit the Soviet Union together and why connections across national boundaries forged in the Soviet period remain relevant within and beyond Eurasia a generation after the union’s demise.

Dismissed until recently as an ideological fig leaf concealing the USSR’s “true” regional and global ambitions, Soviet internationalism has received renewed attention among scholars who take it seriously as a conceptual framework and practice that ran through Soviet life and shaped engagement with the broader world. Recent scholarship has unearthed Soviet internationalism’s intellectual underpinnings and traced its influence in a wide range of areas, including foreign policy, education, art, literature, cinema, and everyday life. Scholars have also pointed to its legacies, both among the diverse populations of contemporary Russia and Eurasia and in Russia’s current relations with Africa, Asia, the Middle East, and Latin America. Soviet internationalism offers a way to connect the study of nationality, a subject that has received ample attention in our field, with the study of race, which has been comparatively neglected.

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CFP: Studies in Russian, Eurasian, and Central European New Media (Digital Icons)

Deadline: July 31, 2020

www.digitalicons.org

Digital Selves
Embodiment and Co-Presence
in New Media Cultures in Central Europe and Eurasia

Guest editors:
Cassandra Hartblay (University of Toronto)
Tatiana Klepikova (University of Toronto)

Since the emergence of new media cultures, the theorization of the relationship between embodied positioning in space and our digital personas has evolved in new and significant directions. We have become increasingly aware of the forms of extended, multiple and fragmented selves that are made possible by internet and computer-facilitated settings. New media have championed previously unthinkable practices of self-representation necessitating a change in how researchers understand the virtual traces of our bodies online and the relationship between material bodies and physical spaces.

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CFP: Systemic Race and Police Brutality (Slavic and East European Journal)

Deadline: August 31, 2020

In response to AATSEEL’s recent statement concerning systemic racism and police brutality in the United States, Slavic and East European Journal is seeking submissions for a special issue on the politics of race in Slavic, East European and Eurasian literature, film, cultural studies, linguistics, and pedagogy. We envision this cluster addressing three objectives: 1) showcasing cutting-edge research on race studies in our fields and interrogating matters of majority-minority power relations in the context of race and ethnic studies; 2) advancing new curriculum ideas and pedagogical approaches on the topic; 3) highlighting our professions’ impactful community engagement, broadly conceived, related to race studies.

To be considered for the cluster, please submit a 500- to 1,000-word abstract and outline of methods and arguments by August 31. Please also indicate the anticipated length of your essay. Authors of selected abstracts will be notified shortly after that and will be expected to submit complete versions (3,000–8,000 words) by November 30, 2020. Depending on the number of abstracts and anticipated lengths, we plan to publish a cluster of 8–12 pieces.

Sunnie Rucker-Chang (Assistant Professor of Slavic and East European Studies and Director of the European Studies Program, University of Cincinnati) has joined Yana Hashamova (Professor of Slavic Studies, Ohio State University; Editor, SEEJ)  and Alexander Burry (Associate Professor of Slavic Studies, Ohio State University; Co-editor, SEEJ) for the curation and editing of the cluster.

CFP: Vernacular Responses to Covid-19 Pandemic (Folklorica)

Deadline: October 31, 2020

Folklorica, the Journal of the Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Folklore Association, is accepting submissions for a special issue on vernacular responses to the Covid-19 Pandemic.

The Covid-19 Pandemic has sent a ripple through a fraught and interconnected world, drastically shifting global currents towards stasis and seclusion. Countries have shut-down, hospitals have been overwhelmed, people have been relegated to their homes and the world has ground to a halt in a number of ways. It is in such times of crisis as these that folklore becomes a tool to fill the gaps of indeterminacy, to provide comfort, to attempt to explain how and why these events are unfolding and, in more insidious manifestations, to cast blame for the crisis on various real or imagined parties.

We at SEEFA are interested to hear how various parts of the Eastern European and Eurasian world are handling these events and what productive, vernacular arts and practices are flowering in this unusual yet fertile soil. We invite calls for the submission of original articles and field reports regarding Eastern European and Eurasian vernacular responses to the pandemic for an upcoming special issue of Folklorica. Given the scope of our field and the many angles from which articles could approach the material, we are aiming to receive numerous shorter pieces (theoretical musings, preliminary fieldwork reports, smaller articles on specific iterations, and other short, quality work) that will serve as an expanded forum on Eastern European folkloric approaches to the pandemic. 

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CFP: Slavic Review Forum on Race and Bias

Deadline: August 15, 2020

Seeking to address current social and political upheaval around systemic racism and to engage with questions of race and bias in our profession, our field, and our research, Slavic Review will host a Critical Discussion Forum, to be published approximately in June 2021. Thus, we are inviting scholars in any phase of the profession to submit abstracts of up to 250 words on any aspect of race in the profession and or race as an object of study in Russia, Eurasia, and Eastern Europe. All disciplines are welcome.

Please send abstracts to the editor, Harriet Murav, at slavrev@illinois.edu by August 15. The organizing committee of this Forum will ask up to 20 authors to develop their abstracts into 3000 word articles, not including footnotes, to be submitted by October 1, 2020.  The completed articles will be peer reviewed.

For more information generally about Slavic Review, see: www.slavicreview.illinois.edu

For questions regarding this Critical Discussion Forum on race and bias, please contact Harriet Murav at slavrev@illinois.edu.

The organizing committee:
Joy Carew (University of Louisville)
Christina Kiaer (Northwestern University)
Harriet Murav (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign)

CFP: Studies in Russian, Eurasian, and Central European New Media

Deadline: July 31, 2020

Call for proposals for a special issue of Digital Icons: Studies in Russian, Eurasian and Central European New Media (www.digitalicons.org)

“Digital Selves: Embodiment and Co-Presence in New Media Cultures in Central Europe and Eurasia” (to be published early summer 2021)

Guest editors: Cassandra Hartblay and Tatiana Klepikova (University of Toronto)

Since the emergence of new media cultures, the theorization of the relationship between embodied positioning in space and our digital personas has evolved in new and significant directions. We have become increasingly aware of the forms of extended, multiple and fragmented selves that are made possible by internet and computer-facilitated settings. New media have championed previously unthinkable practices of self-representation necessitating a change in how researchers understand the virtual traces of our bodies online and the relationship between material bodies and physical spaces.

As of recently, the global pandemic has shifted daily practices and forced many people to seek new, predominantly online, ways of socializing. However, even before this crisis, there were many digital ways of being apart together – developed in minority or marginalized communities. For instance, in mid-March 2020, Russian disability activists started a hashtag campaign, #ButWeAreAlwaysAtHome (#АМыВсегдаДома) seeking to mobilize popular conversations about ‘surviving quarantine’ to highlight ongoing social exclusion of people with disabilities and crip strategies for living at home.

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