Demystifying Video (and other types of recording)

    

You want to make a video but you don’t know where to start…

You’ve come to the right place.

The short video below is a great place to begin. You can also contact me any time so we can discuss which option(s) might be best for you.

You can also download an interactive version of this Getting Started Guide here. (coming soon)

 

 Disclaimer: this is NOT a comprehensive guide to video and/or audio production. Rather, it is an overview of several of the easiest, most common options available to you as a faculty member if you wish to record a lecture, presentation, or anything else.

 

Getting Started with Video (and Audio)

There are TONS of different ways you can record a lecture, a presentation, a group discussion, or anything else. And you can easily turn these (audio or video) recordings into great learning materials for your classes.

But until you’ve done a few recordings yourself, it can be a little daunting because there are SO many options and it’s not always easy to know which is best for your particular needs.

So, here we will try to address some of the various issues you may encounter and answer the most common questions people have when it comes time to record audio or video or anything else.

Click here to start learning about audio recordings. Or, click here to skip ahead to the section about video recording.

As always, if you have any questions about anything you find here, please don’t hesitate to contact me. I can even meet with you for a one-on-one consultation to help figure out which recording options are best for you.

Let’s get started by talking about the difference between audio recordings and video recordings.

Part 1: Audio

If you’re only recording the audio of a lecture or some other presentation, and people can download it and/or listen to it on demand, this is what would commonly be called a podcast. You may or may not realize it, but you’ve probably listened to plenty of podcasts yourself. And, you may have even made a few in the past.

Typically, podcasts do require some amount of preparation beforehand and editing after the fact. However, they don’t typically require nearly as much work as video recordings. The best part is, you can create your own podcasts FOR FREE.

 

Step-By-Step Instructions for Recording Audio

Now that you know you want to create an audio recording, it’s time to decide exactly which option is best for you. You have 3 options to choose from*.

  1. You can use your own smartphone
  2. You can use your own laptop
  3. You can check out an iPad

* These aren’t really the ONLY options, but they are among the easiest and least expensive options.

 

A Side Note about Microphones

In addition to the following instructions, if you plan to do lots of audio recording, it might be worth it to invest in some equipment of your own. For example, you can purchase a USB microphone or a wireless microphone from Amazon for between $20 and $50.

Here are 3 good options*:

  1. USB microphone (great if you’re sitting or standing in one spot)
  2. Wireless lavalier microphone (best option if you have a USB connection)
  3. Wireless lavalier microphone (best for most smartphones or tablets)

 

*lots of other, more expensive microphone options exist…

 

Option 1: Use your own smartphone (and the UT Box app)

You can use your own smartphone and one or two apps to create your own podcast recordings. The best part is, it’s not only free, it’s super easy.

Here’s what you need:

Whether you have an android phone or an Apple iPhone, you’ll need two things, both of which are available on the app store for your respective mobile device:

 

1.      A voice recording app

a.Note: iPhones come with the Voice Memo app already installed

 
2.      The Box app

a.      Install the free app

b.      Note: logging in to UT Box might be a little confusing. The first time you log in, be sure you do the following:

c.       Click Log in (do not click “Sign Up”)

d.      Next, click “Use Single Sign On (SSO)”

 

 

 

After you’ve recorded a lecture, or anything else, you can upload the recording straight to your UT Box account from your phone.

Here’s how (on an iphone). Or, skip ahead to option three to see the step-by-step instructions. Note: instructions for android phones will vary slightly from those shown in the video.

From there, you can embed the recording into your Canvas course, create a hyperlink in an email, etc.

 

 

Note: If you’d like to, you can also check out one of our wireless microphones. Click here to see instructions for setting up the wireless mic on a smartphone (or iPad). After reviewing the instructions, contact me to check out equipment.

 

 

 

Option 2: Use your own laptop (and free Audacity software)

If you have your own laptop that you’re willing to use, this probably offers you the most flexibility in terms of options available to you.

 

To get started, download and install Audacity. This free software allows you to record and edit audio on either a PC or Mac computer.

If you’ve never used Audacity and would like to learn more, click here to get started.

Note: if you have a Mac laptop, you can also use the free QuickTime Player software to record both audio and video. But, this does not allow you to edit your recordings.

Note: If you’d like to, you can also check out one of our wireless microphones. Click here to see instructions for setting up the wireless mic on a smartphone (or iPad). After reviewing the instructions, contact me to check out equipment.

 

Here’s how to get started:

  1. Open Audacity on your laptop and start recording.
    1. If you’re using an external microphone, make sure this is plugged in first.
    2. Here are the instructions for using a wireless mic or a USB mic.
  2. Once you’re done, stop recording.
  3. Use Audacity to edit your recording (if necessary).
  4. Save the recording to your computer as an MP3.
  5. Upload to UT Box and embed the recording into your Canvas course. Or, upload the recording straight into Canvas.

 

Option 3: Borrow a School of Nursing iPad

If you don’t want to use your smartphone or don’t have a laptop to use, you can also check out one of the iPads that we have set up and ready to go for recording audio (or video).

After reviewing these instructions, contact me to check out the equipment you need.

Here’s a video showing the step-by-step instructions listed below. 

Once you have the iPad, here’s how to get started:

  1. Turn on the iPad and enter the access code (0000).
  2. Open the Voice Recorder
  3. Press the microphone icon on the bottom of the screen.
  4. Press REC to begin recording.
  5. When you’re finished, press STOP.
  6. Press TAP TO NAME to change the name of your recording.
  7. Press Done.
    1. Your new recording is now displayed at the top of the screen.

Now, you’re ready to upload your recording to UT Box:

  1. Press the Home button and return to the home screen.
  2. Open the Box app.
  3. Press Log In.
  4. Press Use Single Sign On (SSO)
    1. Note: DO NOT press log in here!
  5. Enter your UT email address (this is the email address associated with your UT Box account).
  6. Press Log In.
    1. This opens the UT log in page.
  7. Enter your UT EID and password to log in to your UT Box account.
  8. Double click the Home button and return to the Voice Recorder app.
  9. Press on your new recording to open it.
  10. Press the Share icon in the upper, right-hand corner.
  11. Press Share.
  12. Press Share audio (mp3).
  13. Press the Box icon.
  14. Select the Folder where you wish to save your recording.
  15. Press Upload.

 

Final Thoughts Regarding Audio Recordings

The options described above will help you get started recording audio for just about anything from meetings to full-length lectures, and anything in between. However, it’s just the beginning and we haven’t REALLY begun creating a true podcast, at least, not yet.

That doesn’t mean that your recordings aren’t valuable, they are. If you want to record your lectures and make them available to students later on, all three options are great.

But, if you’re interested in doing something a little more polished, a little more formal, a little more like an actual podcast, then don’t hesitate to contact me. We can work together to get started creating great content for you and your students.

 

Part 2: Video

So you want to record more than just the audio of your lecture? Well, luckily (or not…) there are lots of options available to you if you want to record a live action video.

One of the things that makes video such a wonderful option is its flexibility. You can do just about anything you want to. And, of course, that flexibility can also bring with it a lot of confusion if you’re new to video production.

But, have no fear. The purpose of this section is to help you figure out which option is best for you. And, if you’re still not sure or you have any questions or concerns, please don’t hesitate to contact me.

 

Step-By-Step Instructions for Recording Video

Now that you know you want to create a video, it’s time to decide exactly which option is best for you. You have (at least) 3 options to choose from.

  1. Borrow a School of Nursing iPad
  2. Schedule a time to use a School of Nursing laptop
  3. Use your own laptop or office computer (to record a screencast)

If these options don’t deliver what you’re looking for contact me so we can discuss the possibilities. Or, if you need something more polished and professional looking, contact the LAITS Development Studio. They can help you (for a fee) with video production and lots more.

Option 1: Borrow a School of Nursing iPad

Using an iPad is a surprisingly simple and easy way to record short videos. Just like your smartphone, for their size, they have high-quality cameras and microphones. But, iPads DO have certain limitations as well. For example, because their storage capacity is limited, you can only shoot videos of a certain length.

So, if you want to record a video that is less than 30 minutes in length, you can check out one of the iPads that we have set up and ready to go. After reviewing these instructions, contact me to check out the equipment you need.

Click here to see an example of what your finished video might look like.

Here’s some of the equipment you may (or may not) need:

  1. School of Nursing iPad
  2. Adjustable tripod
  3. Kimafun Wireless microphone

 

Here’s how to start recording your first video:

  1. Set up and position your tripod (see video instructions here).
  2. Attach the iPad to the tripod mount.
  3. Turn on and connect the Kimafun microphone (see video instructions here).
  4. Plug the Kimafun microphone receiver into the iPad headphone jack (on the top).
  5. Turn on the iPad and enter the access code (0000).
    1. It may take a few moments, but the iPad will automatically connect to the network.
  6. Open the YouTube app.
  7. Sign in to the School of Nursing’s YouTube account (if you don’t already see the UT Tower icon).
  8. Click the person icon in the upper, right-hand corner to Sign In.
  9. Click Sign In.
  10. Select the account named “Instructional Technology UT School of Nursing”
    1. Please contact me if you need login information.
  11. After you sign in to YouTube, click the Camera icon in the upper, right-hand corner.
  12. Click Record.
  13. Click the Flip icon above the record button to flip the camera around.
  14. Press the red record button at the bottom of the screen to start recording.
  15. Press the record button a second time when you’re ready to stop.
  16. After you’re finished recording, follow the on-screen prompts to Trim (or edit) your video.
  17. Press Next to continue.
  18. Enter the Title and other identifying information for your video.
    1. Be sure to choose Unlisted from the Privacy options. This ensures that the video is not public, and that only people with a link can view it.
  19. Click Upload.

 

Here’s a video showing the step-by-step instructions listed above:

Note: Depending on the length of your video, the upload process may take quite some time. Be patient.

Once your video is uploaded, you can share it with others by adding a link or embedding the recording into your Canvas course, adding a hyperlink in an email, etc.

Finally, if the video you wish to record includes anything being projected onto a screen, such as a PowerPoint slideshow or anything else on a screen, this is probably NOT the best option for you as this type of video is not really best suited to projected images.

If you wish to record anything that includes projectors or computer screens, skip ahead to option 3.

 

Option 2: Schedule a time to use a School of Nursing laptop

The previous section describes a “do it yourself” method of recording your own short videos (<30min.).

But what if you want to record something longer?

Or, what if you don’t want to hassle with all that technology and would like someone to help you with that?

No problem. THIS is the section for you.

Click here to see an example of what your finished video might look like.

 

Contact me at your convenience so we can discuss the logistics of your video and make all the arrangements. After that consultation, I will be able to take care of recording the video for you using a School of Nursing laptop and other equipment.

The following equipment is available and I will help set everything up and take your recording from initial recording to finished product:

  1. Mac laptop
  2. AV cart
  3. Wireless lapel microphone
  4. HD webcam

 

Finally, if the video you wish to record includes anything being projected onto a screen, such as a PowerPoint slideshow or anything else on a screen, this is may not be the best options. However, it’s not out of the question. If you wish to combine projected images, like a slideshow, with live action video, please contact me so we can discuss the details.

 

Option 3: Use your own laptop or office computer (to record a screencast)

The two previous options are great if you want to record live action video of you (and/or others) in front of the camera. But what if want to do something that doesn’t require that?  For example, maybe you want to add narration or voice overs to a PowerPoint slideshow or you want to explain how a website works while actually showing the process on screen?

In that case, what you want is called a screencast.

Click here to see an example of what your finished video might look like.

Screencasts are a great, easy way to create video content without worrying about being “on camera” (though you can if you want to be).

To get started learning about screencasts, check out the following blog posts:

  1. Screencasting Basics
  2. Screencasting: Beyond the Basics
  3. Narrating PowerPoint Slideshows

 

In addition to screencasts, you can also record audio and video directly into your Canvas course if you’d like. You may already be familiar with this feature, but if not, Canvas’ Rich Content Editor has a recording feature built right into it. Learn more here.

 

Once you’ve reviewed these resources, if you still have questions or would like to explore other options and alternatives, don’t hesitate to contact me.

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